News

CASA: September regulatory wrap-up [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

September regulatory wrap-up

Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Instruments

New fatigue transition dates

As part of our response to the independent review of the fatigue rules, we have announced new transition dates. High capacity regular public transport operators are required to transition to CAO 48.1 by 30 September 2019 and all other air operators by 26 March 2020. The deadline for operators to transition by 31 October 2018 no longer applies. View the amendment instrument on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Drug and alcohol management plans

We published a legislative instrument with two exemptions that make it easier for organisations with a drug and alcohol management plan (DAMP) to contract other DAMP organisations or emergency services organisations when required. View the instrument on the CASA website.

Part 61 Manual of Standards updated

The Part 61 Manual of Standards (MOS) master document has been updated so that the latest changes are now in one place. View the latest MOS on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Exemptions

CAR 234 Fuel requirements exemption

Existing AOC and Part 141 certificate holders have more time to comply with the new fuel requirements under a new exemption.

You will now have until 28 February 2019 to comply with the requirements of the CAR 234 amendment and CASA Instrument 29/18 (the Fuel Instrument).

Private pilots are required to comply with the new rules from 8 November 2018. Guidance material is available on the CASA website.

Consultations

Proposed Part 101 Drones Manual of Standards

We're seeking public feedback on new draft rules for commercial or professional drone operations. Visit the Consultation Hub to provide your feedback by 18 November 2018.

Part 149 Manual of Standards

We have opened consultation on the Part 149 Manual of Standards (MOS) for approved self-administering aviation organisations (ASAOs). You can view the draft Part 149 MOS and provide your feedback in the Consultation Hub until 21 October 2018.

Amendments to the Part 66 Manual of Standards

We published a summary of feedback to our consultation on minor changes to the Part 66 Manual of Standards (MOS) on the Consultation Hub.

Guidance material

Fatigue guidance material

We have updated the fatigue operations manual supplement templates associated with CAAP 48-1 to reflect new transition dates and correct some editorial errors. Additional changes will be developed to support forthcoming amendments to the rules. View the guidance materials on the CASA website.

Approved maintenance training organisations

The advisory circular for approved Part 147 training organisations has been updated to add new organisations, remove expired organisations and make minor amendments to course information. View AC 147-02v5.14 on the CASA website.

Announcements

Cheaper ADS-B on the way

We have listened to the aviation community and will be developing rule changes aimed at making it cheaper and easier for automatic dependent surveillance—broadcast (ADS-B) technology to be voluntarily fitted to visual flight rules aircraft. More information is in the media release.

CASA response to independent fatigue review

We have published a report outlining our response to the independent review of the fatigue rules. Following extensive public consultation, CASA has accepted 21 of the 24 review recommendations. Read the report and find out more about our plan for responding to the review recommendations on our website.

Licensing regulations transition complete

The four-year transition period for the new flight crew licensing and training regulations was completed at the end of August 2018 with 242 flying training organisations approved during the transition period. SeeCASA Briefing for more information.

 

UAVFUTURES drones changed my life Competition.

Members,

For your information:

UAVFUTURES drones changed my life - The positive change FPV drones had on my life was the catalyst to why I started Uavfutures in the first place. With A lot of misinformed negativity about FPV drone racing it is time we band together and show the public how awesome and life-changing this hobby really is. There have been countless emails from subscribers about how fpv changed their lives, even saved their lives so lets make a public push to get these amazing stories out there. THE WINNING VIDEO GETS THE ULTIMATE PRIZE OF 1 x fatshark HDO FPV goggle -
http://bit.ly/fatsharkHDO 1 x tbs tango with Cross fire TX and RX - http://bit.ly/TBStango 1 x BNF armattan rooster - http://bit.ly/roosterBNF5 The uavfutures drones changed my life comp official rules Official Rules 1. Your video must be submitted to the discord thread https://discord.gg/pnGdeEG before november 1st. 2. Your video must be public on youtube.com 3. Judges ruling is final and will me made up of a panel of judges. 4. Each video will be scored with the Score Rubric For “Drones changed my life” linked in this document - https://docs.google.com/document/d/1c... 5. The highest scoring video is the winner and will receive a fatshark HDO goggle, tbs tango radio with crossfire set up and armattan PNP rooster. 6. Video Entry titles must contain the phrase “drones changed my life” 7. You agree to allowing your video entry to be showcased on uavfutures youtube channel 8. Your video description must contain the following so just copy paste this part below into your video description. “Competition video at UAVFUTURES https://youtu.be/e8FNhUdRYis , Thanks to fatshark for providing the amazing prize of HDO’s - http://bit.ly/fatsharkHDO , To Team Black Sheep for their awesome Tango and Crossfire system http://bit.ly/TBStango and Armattan for their lifetime warranty tough rooster drones - http://bit.ly/roosterBNF5 “ Youtube is in no way affiliated with this competition.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - September 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

Cheaper ADS-B on the way

CASA has listened to the aviation community and will be developing rule changes aimed at making it cheaper and easier for automatic dependent surveillance—broadcast (ADS-B) technology to be voluntarily fitted to visual flight rules aircraft. This action follows consultation which showed broad support for the voluntary adoption of ADS-B across general aviation. The consultation made it clear the installation of ADS-B in the visual flight rules aircraft fleet should remain voluntary and CASA accepts this position. The challenge has been to find the right solutions and incentives that will encourage the fitting of ADS-B while maintaining an acceptable level of safety. CASA is proposing to adjust the equipment and installation standards to achieve these outcomes.

A mechanism will be established to classify the installation of ADS-B equipment in smaller type-certificated aircraft as a minor modification – not requiring an approval. For non-type certificated aircraft - including amateur home-built and sports aviation aircraft - owners and operators will be able to install ADS-B avionics that is compliant with a relevant ADS-B technical standard, but without necessarily being authorised under that standard. Installation of this equipment would be allowable under self-administration arrangements.

The solutions we are proposing genuinely reflect the preferences and ideas from the aviation community, including avionics manufacturers and installers. We see this as a sensible and practical solution for the visual flight rules community to ensure technology that makes the skies safer is available and more affordable. There will be further consultation on the detail of the proposed rule changes before they are finalised and implemented.

Read the feedback on the ADS-B consultation at CASA’s consultation hub.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Latest news

Staged transition to new fatigue rules

A staged approach is being taken to the transition to new fatigue rules for Australian aviation. High capacity regular public transport operators will transition to the new fatigue rules by 30 September 2019. All other air operators will need to move to the new fatigue requirements by 26 March 2020. This follows the adoption by CASA of most of the recommendations made in an independent review of the fatigue rules. CASA accepted the recommendations after extensive public consultation, as well as consideration of advice from the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and an industry technical working group. The review and subsequent consultation have also resulted in a number of changes to the fatigue requirements and the way they are to be implemented. These include a revision of flight duty periods to align more closely to international averages, a better approach to approving and monitoring fatigue risk management systems, improved guidance on flight and duty time limits and fatigue risk management systems, a sample fatigue risk management system manual and examples of acceptable means of compliance. CASA has committed to ongoing monitoring of fatigue data and international practices to inform any future changes and will scrutinise the transition to the new rules to determine if any further improvements are needed. CASA’s Board is satisfied the fatigue changes strike an appropriate balance between safety and impact on the aviation community.

Find out more about the fatigue changes.

We listen to flight rules feedback

A number of changes are being made to the proposed general operating and flight rules following an analysis of responses to consultation. CASA issued the proposed Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations in March 2018 for broad consultation and received 116 responses. There was majority support for the proposed package of regulations, with feedback on specific items indicating a need for some amendments. CASA intends to make Part 91 in the fourth quarter of 2018, followed by the making of the Part 91 manual of standards in early 2019. The rules will commence in March 2021. Changes are now being made to a range of proposed provisions. The fitness-for-duty rule is being amended to reinstate the eight-hour rule and add a prescriptive blood alcohol level requirement. Amendments are being made to the cruising level requirements from 1000 ft to 1500 ft above ground level to provide appropriate alleviation in the reduction of the above mean sea level height from the current 5000 ft to 3000 ft above mean sea level. The requirements for taking off and landing into the wind at non-controlled aerodromes are being changed to permit cross wind training. Existing requirements for the carriage of passengers in experimental amateur-built aircraft will continue without the need for further approval. The flight instrument equipment requirements for experimental amateur-built aircraft are being changed to clarify the approval process so it is not more onerous or complex. It is also being made clear aircraft operated under the visual flight rules are not required to be fitted with or display anti-collision lights or navigation lights.

Get full details on Part 91 consultation responses.

Licensing regulations transition complete

The four-year transition period for the new flight crew licensing and training regulations was completed at the end of August 2018. This means old flight crew licences and authorisations are no longer valid and all active pilots have converted their licences to new Part 61 Civil Aviation Safety Regulation licences. Pilots who have not been active can still convert their licence at any time when required. Flight training organisations have moved to Part 141 and 142 approvals. On 1 September 2018 there were 242 flying training organisations with these approvals. CASA’s CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said despite the challenges of transition an enormous amount of work was been delivered on time. “It is a remarkable achievement that couldn’t have happened without the efforts of the aviation community. I appreciate the commitment to the transition by flying training organisations who were asked to do this work on top of their usual business. I particularly want to thank people who contributed through participation in the Part 61 solutions taskforce and the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel. Issues with the new regulations were addressed and improvements made where appropriate. We will continue to work on improvements to the flight crew licensing regulations and the Part 61 manual of standards, including incorporating the intent of current exemptions and approvals.”

Find out more about the licensing regulations.

Wet season safety for top end pilots

It’s time to focus on the coming wet season across the top end of the nation. To help pilots stay safe during the wet CASA is holding a special safety seminar in Darwin in October 2018. The free seminar will focus on pilot decision making relevant to flying in the wet season across northern Australia. There will be discussion about key issues such as aircraft and pilot limitations, weather forecasts and air traffic control services. CASA subject matter experts will be joined by representatives from the Bureau of Metrology and Defence air traffic control. The ‘Weather to fly – wet season decision making’ seminar will help pilots of all qualifications and levels of experience operate safely during the coming months. The seminar is an ideal opportunity to learn, ask questions of CASA and discuss local aviation safety issues. It is being held on Wednesday 24 October 2018 from 18:30 to 20:30 at the Novotel Darwin Airport, 2 Sir Norman Brearley Drive, Darwin Airport. CASA is planning to release an online video presentation based on the seminar for pilots who cannot attend the Darwin event.

Book your place now at the Darwin wet season safety seminar.

Lithium battery cabin safety

Advice for air operators and cabin crew on managing lithium battery risks has been released. It is estimated the average Australian passenger travels with up to six electronic devices powered by lithium batteries during each flight. A new cabin safety bulletin covers the management of an in-flight lithium battery fire, including the actions to be taken by cabin crew. Lithium batteries can overheat, ignite and release noxious gases. Problems can be caused by electrical shorting, rapid discharge, overcharging, a manufacturing defect, poor design or damage such as crushing or dropping. Overheating results in a process called “thermal runaway”, which is a reaction within the battery causing internal temperatures and pressure to rise at a quicker rate than can be dissipated. While the carriage and use of electronic devices with lithium batteries is not an overwhelming risk to flight safety there are potential risks, particularly if devices cannot be easily and quickly accessed. The cabin safety bulletin says appropriate crew training is an important mitigating factor in preventing lithium battery incidents. Operators should also have documented procedures in their operations manuals available to flight, cabin and ground personnel. Every effort should be made to ensure passengers are aware of the requirements for the carriage of batteries in their cabin or checked baggage.

Read the lithium battery cabin safety bulletin.

Prop governor warning

A warning has been issued about a potential problem with McCauley propeller governors. The issue relates to suspected unapproved parts that may not conform to the approved design. Checks should be made in relation to any McCauley propeller governor with an idler gear bearing part number A-20028, marked “BA-59”. The bearing is installed within the oil pump idler gear of the governor to boost engine oil pressure to facilitate propeller blade control. Problems with the bearing can cause the governor to lose some or all control. In a single-engine aircraft this will show as the RPM being too high, with an inability of the governor to keep the RPM down. In twin-engine aircraft the RPM will be too low, with an inability to bring the RPM up to the set speed or may result in the propeller going into uncommanded feather. Bearing deterioration or failure may also cause metal contamination within the engine oil system, with consequential wear and damage to internal rotational and reciprocating assemblies requiring engine bulk-strip for repair. CASA recommends aircraft owners, operators, maintainers and parts distributors inspect their aircraft records and parts inventory for the identified suspected unapproved parts and take appropriate action. A McCauley Service Bulletin provides more information.

Go to the propeller governor airworthiness bulletin.

In Brief

  • Michael Bridge has been appointed to the CASA Board for a three-year term. Mr Bridge is a former chief executive of Airnorth and has more than 30 years experience as a pilot. He brings considerable aviation safety, management and corporate governance experience to the CASA Board.
  • The dates for the 2019 Flight Examiner Rating course classroom workshops have been released. The workshops will be held from February to October 2019 in Perth, Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney. Participants must enroll at least 21 days before each course.
  • A new easy to use form is on the CASA web site to help members of the public and the aviation community report unsafe drone operations. The form captures the information CASA needs to investigate potential breaches of the drone safety regulations. CASA has issued nearly 50 infringement notices during 2018 to date for drone safety breaches.
  • A summary of the feedback to consultation on the review of Part 145 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations has been released. A technical working group under the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel will be formed to analyze the issues identified and develop solutions.
  • An Ayers Rock airspace review report has been released. The review found there were no risks that required changes to the existing Ayers Rock airspace. Stakeholder feedback focused on improving efficiency and shared use of the airspace.
  • A proposed manual of standards to accompany the remotely piloted aircraft regulations has been released for comment. The proposed requirements create clear standards for remote pilot training and training organisations, create Australia’s first official syllabi for the remote pilot licence, clarify requirements for drone operations in controlled and prescribed non-controlled airspace, facilitate extended visual line of sight operations and formalise recordkeeping and notification requirements for drone operators.
  • Comments are being sought on the manual of standards for Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Part 149, which was made earlier in 2018, covers approved self-administering sport and recreational aviation organisations. Consultation is open until 21 October 2018.

Pilot seminars in October

The current series of AvSafety seminars provides support for developing pilot skills in three key areas - communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The focus is on operations at non-controlled aerodromes, with a practical scenario used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. Discussion will look at how threat and error management techniques complement the technical aspects of flying an aircraft. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In October 2018 seminars are being held at:

  • Albury
  • Atherton
  • Cairns
  • Clare Valley
  • Coffs Harbour
  • Echuca
  • Geraldton
  • Horn Island
  • Maryborough, Victoria
  • Mt Isa
  • Port Lincoln
  • Port Macquarie
  • Yarrawonga.

Book a place at your local AvSafety seminar.

October seminars for engineers

Seven engineering seminars are being held in October 2018. These seminars will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. Engineering seminars are at:

  • Adelaide
  • Albury
  • Geraldton
  • Horn Island
  • Jandakot
  • Parafield
  • Perth

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.



Social Media

Follow CASA on social media now.

We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and YouTube.

 


CASA: Have your say on proposed new drone rules [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Have your say on proposed new drone rules

CASA is seeking public feedback on new draft rules for commercial or professional drone operations.

The new rules are designed to improve safety and certainty for remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) operations (popularly known as drones). They aim to:

  • create clear standards for remote pilot training and training organisations
  • create Australia’s first official syllabi for RPAS accreditation, in particular, the remote pilot licence (RePL)
  • clarify requirements for RPAS operations in controlled and prescribed non-controlled airspace
  • facilitate extended visual line of sight (EVLOS) operations
  • formalise record keeping and notification requirements for RPAS operators generally.

The rules are contained in the draft manual of standards (MOS) of Part 101 of Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR). The MOS helps standardise the professional drones industry by setting specific training and operational requirements. These support the rules already in place under CASR Part 101.

Only a small section of the proposed new rules will directly affect recreational users – clarifying the requirements to operate in controlled and non-controlled airspace. So, for people who fly for fun, all the basic drone rules remain the same.

 


Update on the Manilla Slopefest Raffle.

From the AMAS Inc President:

Each year we run a raffle at slope fest for attendees and the winners drawn at the Saturday night presentation dinner. 


The raffle proceeds have in the past gone to Cancer Research.

This year in support of Manilla Township the proceeds went to Manilla Lions club. 


Slope fest sponsors are very generous and their contact details can be found here:
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2994346-Manilla-Slope-Fest-2018

In an effort to raise much needed funds for our drought affected farmers I had an idea to offer a raffle prize for all those unable to make it to this event.

Tickets ($5each no limit ) could only be bought on line for this prize and drawn Saturday September 15th in the evening. . 

I donated a NIB Dream-flight Alula. https://dream-flight.com/products/alula-trek
Complete with servos and a battery posted anywhere in Australia.

Id like to thank everyone for their generosity.


We raised a whopping $4601.25 in the raffles and on site auction..

Steve and Glen handed the money over to the Manilla Lions Club on Sunday morning and they were shocked to get such a generous amount.

An awesome result!

 

The total for the on line raffle was $440.00       With 88 online tickets sold. 

The winning ticket was drawn by a random number selector was one bought by a person who purchased over 20% of the tickets.

I guess the numbers game works.  


The onsite raffle raised $3511.25


The Sig Samarai model built by Jeff Greene from Coffs Harbour sold for $500.00
and the Jart fuse he donated sold for $150

 

Thank you all who participated.   

Phil Poole    

AMAS Inc President.

BluewaterTownsville FunFly Flyin

17th and 18th November!
Fly in 17- 18  Nov 2018 final

Bundaberg Aeromodellers Fly In

Members:


Only a couple of weeks until our Spring Fun Fly. All types of aircraft welcome, no registration fee and insurance provided for visitors.
If you are intending coming along could you please contact the club so we have an idea of numbers, particularly if you are camping.
Breakfast and lunch available from the canteen Saturday and Sunday, cold drinks, tea/coffee and snacks.

Bundy  Event

Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 3-18

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 22nd September, 2018

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 8th September, 2018.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member(s)


Edit: 9-9-18   The following nominations have been received:


President:         Mr Phillip Poole

Vice President: Mr Peter Coles

Secretary:         Mr Mike Snabaitis

Treasurer:         Mr John Taylor

Committee:       Mr Lex Cunningham


 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th August  2018. Edit: 14-8-18, No agenda items and no notices of motion were received.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 9th August  2018 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 6th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 20th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

Manilla Slope Fest

Members,

A message from the acting AMAS Inc President Mr Phillip Poole,

 

Annual "Manilla Slope fest" charity raffle 
Each year we run a raffle at slope fest for attendees and the winners drawn at the Saturday night presentation dinner. 
The raffle proceeds have in the past gone to Cancer Research.

This year in support of Manilla Township the proceeds will go to Manilla Lions club. 
Slope fest sponsors are very generous and their contact details can be found here. 
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...lope-Fest-2018

In an effort to raise much needed funds for our drought affected farmers I had an idea to offer a raffle prize for all those unable to make it to this event.

Tickets ($5each no limit ) can only be bought on line for this prize and drawn Saturday September 15th in the evening. . 

I have donated a NIB Dream-flight Alula. https://dream-flight.com/products/alula-trek
Complete with servos and a battery posted anywhere in Australia.

Glenn from Off the Edge Sailplanes Will keep a record and tally of the tickets sold http://www.offtheedge.com.au/page.php?id=1 

Ticket purchases can be made to his PayPal account. orders@offtheedge.com.au .

Be sure to include your name and phone number with your ticket purchase. 

Phil Poole.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - August 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing, your monthly CASA update

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

New rule making thank you - new CASA Board chair

I would like to thank everyone in the aviation community who is participating in the busy current round of new rulemaking. The broad consultation phase for key proposed parts of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations is either complete or nearing completion. Consultation on Part 91, covering the general operating rules, and Part 133, covering rotorcraft air transport, has closed. The comment period for Part 121, covering large air transport, and Part 135, covering small air transport, is open until early September 2018 and includes Part 119, which covers air operator certificates. These rule sets address important safety and operational issues that directly affect much of the commercial aviation community. The feedback we are receiving plays a vital role in ensuring the final regulations are fit for purpose, target known safety risks and do not impose unnecessary regulatory burdens. We will carefully consider all the comments before finalising the rule sets as quickly as possible. My target is to have these operational regulations made before the end of 2018 and taking effect in early 2021. The first step has also been taken in developing specific new regulations for general aviation maintenance, with these rules to be completed in 2019 and introduced later.

I would also like to acknowledge and welcome the appointment of Tony Mathews as chair of the CASA Board for a three-year term. Tony brings a wealth of aviation safety expertise to the Board. He is a former Qantas regional airline manager, Royal Flying Doctor Service manager, and a qualified airline transport pilot. He previously served as the deputy chair of the Board of Airservices Australia.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Piston engine valve warning

All piston engine aircraft operators and maintainers need to be aware of an increasing incidence of premature exhaust valve and valve guide wear. The problem is mainly being found in R22 and R44 helicopters used in mustering in northern Australia but could develop in any aircraft subject to certain operational conditions. The valve wear is due to elevated combustion temperatures which can lead to cracks or large chips forming around the edge of the valve face. The valve head can also separate from the stem, causing sudden loss of cylinder compression. In some cases, problems have emerged in less than 100 hours after inspection. A stakeholder working group has been formed to investigate the causes of the engine problems and will look at a range of issues including changes to the AVGAS grade and how this relates to operations in high air temperature environments. The working group includes representatives from Lycoming, Viva Energy and the Australian Helicopter Industry Association, maintainers and CASA. In an airworthiness bulletin on the issue CASA makes a range of recommendations about fuel supply and handling, engine cylinder cooling, instrument calibration, fuel flow, maintenance and engine condition monitoring. All instances of premature exhaust valve wear should be reported to CASA using the defect reporting system.

Get all the details on the exhaust valve issue.

New regs for general aviation maintenance

The first step has been taken to develop a set of streamlined new maintenance regulations for the general aviation sector. New maintenance regulations will minimise the regulatory burden on general aviation, keep compliance costs as low as possible, be based on the best practices of other leading aviation nations and maintain appropriate levels of safety. CASA has started development of the new general aviation maintenance regulations by asking the aviation community for views on current challenges and opportunities. Feedback has also been sought on existing regulations in the United States, New Zealand, Europe and Canada. Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said CASA was not seeking to re-invent the wheel with the new general aviation maintenance regulations. “We know there are tried and tested sets of maintenance regulations used by other leading aviation nations and we want to base our new rules on these as far as is possible,” Mr Carmody said. “These nations have a strong safety record underpinned by well-regarded safety regulations.” The proposed new regulations will cover maintenance for aircraft used in private and aerial work operations. The air transport sector, including charter and regular public transport, will not be covered by these regulations.

Find out more about the new general aviation maintenance regulations project.

Old licences no longer valid

The four-year transition period for the new flight crew licensing regulations ends on 1 September 2018. From that date old licences and authorisations will no longer be valid. However, the transition provisions are being updated to allow individuals to convert their old licences and authorisations to an equivalent Civil Aviation Safety Regulation Part 61 licence or Part 64 authorisation at any time. All active pilots should have already converted their old licences — issued under Part 5 of Civil Aviation Regulation 1988 — to a new Part 61 licence. This should have happened at the time of any proficiency check, flight review or other licensing activity in the last four years. Pilots who are not actively flying don’t need to convert their old licence before 1 September 2018. These pilots can complete the relevant paperwork at any time and apply to CASA to be transferred to a new Part 61 licence. Before flying they must make sure they have a valid flight review or proficiency check for the ratings they are going to use. Old aeronautical radio operator certificates and flight radiotelephone operator licences issued under the Civil Aviation Regulations cannot be used from 1 September 2018. However, the transition provisions allow holders of these certificates and licences to convert to an equivalent Part 64 authorisation up until 31 August 2025. Please note, from 1 September 2018, CASA will charge a fee of $25 to reissue a Part 61 licence and a Part 64 authorisation.

Find out more about the licensing regulations.

New smaller aeroplane air transport rules

Consultation on new smaller aeroplane air transport regulations closes on 2 September 2018. CASA is seeking comment on the proposed Part 135 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, its manual of standards and the associated Part 119 which covers air operator certificates. A key change in the new regulations will be common rules for all air transport operations – doing away with the current distinction between charter and regular public transport. There are safety enhancements such as crew training and checking requirements, human factors training and safety management systems. The implementation of new requirements will be scaled to fit the size and complexity of operations to keep the regulatory burden to a minimum. Other changes relate to minimum equipment lists, aerodrome requirements, simulator requirements, the carriage and use of oxygen, sterile cockpits and terrain awareness systems. A key driver behind the proposed changes is minimising the difference in accident rates between small aeroplane charter and regular public transport operations. The charter accident rate in smaller aircraft is eleven times higher than equivalent regular public transport. CASA is proposing to start the new regulations in March 2021, with some requirements to apply from a later date to give the aviation community more time to prepare for change. Part 135 will apply to aircraft with a maximum take of weight of 8618 kilograms and a maximum passenger seat configuration of not more than nine. It will cover current passenger charter and regular public transport, as well as cargo and aerial work ambulance functions.

Find out more about Part 135 and comment now.

Proposed larger aeroplane air transport rules

Proposed new regulations for larger aeroplane air transport operations have been released. Part 121 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations will cover regular public transport, charter, cargo and ambulance work in aeroplanes with a maximum take-off weight of more than 8618 kilograms or more than nine passenger seats. The proposed rules retain many existing requirements, while consolidating regulations into one document suite and making them more operationally focused. There are a number of new requirements to bring Australia up to date with leading international standards. Proposed changes relate to extended diversion time operations, fuel and alternate aerodrome requirements, narrow runway operations, underwater locating devices, medical equipment, inexperienced flight crew rostering and cabin crew training and checking. The new rules allow as far as possible for an outcomes-based approach to be used by air operators. The proposed Part 121 is accompanied by the proposed new Part 119, which covers air operator certificates. A key outcome of the package of new rules will be a common level of safety for current charter and regular public transport operations, with both becoming air transport operations. CASA plans for the new rules to come into effect in March 2021, although some provisions may have a later start date if air operators need more time to transition.

Get more on Part 121 and comment before 2 September 2018.

Keeping carry-on baggage safe

Advice on the management of carry-on baggage and baggage issues during emergency evacuations has been released by CASA. Evidence from aircraft accident investigations shows many passengers attempt to take carry-on baggage with them during an emergency evacuation. This can hinder evacuations, cause injury to passengers and crew members, and damage aircraft safety equipment such as evacuation slides. It is important to prevent non-compliant hand luggage from entering an aircraft and this is a key safety role of ground and cabin staff. Crew members must be comprehensively trained in all aspects of carry-on baggage compliance. Operators should regularly review data on cabin baggage acquired through their safety management system. This should be used to evaluate current risk mitigation, inform safety promotion that prevents the carriage of overweight carry-on baggage, raises awareness of trending issues and support cabin crew decision making. There are a range of strategies to be considered to mitigate the risks of passengers retrieving carry-on baggage in an emergency evacuation. These include reinforcing the requirement to leave personal items behind during all passenger briefings, incorporating clearer illustrations into safety instruction cards and using simple, clear crew commands. Cabin crew training must focus on the problem.

Read the cabin safety bulletins on carry-on baggage and evacuations and the management of carry-on baggage.

In Brief

  • The notification requirement for drones operated in the under two kilogram excluded commercial category has been changed. Notification is now required to be renewed every three years instead of every two. However, notification must be updated if the operator makes changes to their operations.
  • Requirements for Part 141 and Part 142 flight training operators to have an alternative person to carry out the duties of key personnel have been removed. A new exemption recognises circumstances where it is unnecessary to have alternative personnel. This change will assist smaller flight training operators and those who provide occasional flight training.
  • Changes to the Part 61 flight testing and proficiency checking system have been introduced, including prescribing check standards in a new format. The new standards provide more flexibility in the design and conduct of flight tests and proficiency checks. The Part 61 manual of standards has been amended.
  • new exemption allows flight examiners, approval holders, approved testing officers and instructors to conduct flight tests, proficiency checks and flight training from a non-control seat to a limited extent. This removes any doubt about legal validity of the practice.
  • All approved testing officer delegations expire on 31 August 2018. From 1 September 2018 these functions are authorised by a flight examiner rating. Holders of this rating are indemnified by CASA up to a cap of $100 million.

Seminars for pilots teach skills

The new series of AvSafety seminars provides support for developing skills in three keys areas - communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The focus is on operations at non-controlled aerodromes, with a practical scenario used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. Discussion will look at how threat and error management techniques complement the technical aspects of flying an aircraft. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In September 2018 seminars are being held at:

  • Albany
  • Aldinga
  • Ayr
  • Archerfield*
  • Caboolture*
  • Cowra
  • Devonport
  • Gold Coast*
  • Hobart
  • Jacobs Well*
  • Kalgoorlie
  • Moree
  • Moorabbin
  • Murwillumbah*
  • Port Augusta
  • Rawnsley Park
  • Rockhampton
  • Southport*
  • Sunshine Coast*
  • Taree
  • Tamworth
  • Wilpena Pound
  • William Creek

Seminars marked with an asterisk include a brief on the World Parachute Championships, being held on the Gold Coast between 4 - 14 October 2018.

Book a place at your local AvSafety seminar.

Important seminars for engineers

Two engineering seminars are being held in September 2018. These seminars will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. Engineering seminars are at:

  • Moorabbin
  • Sunshine Coast.

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.

Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 2-18

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 22nd September, 2018

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 8th September, 2018.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member(s)


 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th August  2018. Edit: 14-8-18, No agenda items and no notices of motion were received.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 9th August  2018 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 6th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 20th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

Brisbane Drone Zones

Members,

Correspondence received from Mr Steven Gilbert:

Hi Mike I would like to let you know the trial drone zones in Brisbane have now been made permanent Thank you(the AMAS Inc) for all your help over the past 18 months. I hope this inspires others to lobby their councils so the zones can spread Australia wide.


here is the link to the story. https://tenplay.com.au/news/brisbane/2018/8/8/brisbane-city-council-makes-10-drone-zones-permanent


 


CASA July regulatory wrap-up [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]



July regulatory wrap-up

Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Announcements

New regulation for sport and recreational aviation

A new regulation for sport and recreational aviation (Part 149) was made on 16 July 2018. This is the first aviation regulation designed for the sector and formalises arrangements that have existed for some time via exemptions. It incorporates activities such as balloons, gliders, historic, experimental, ex-military and replica aircraft. We will shortly start consulting on a Part 149 Manual of Standards. View CASR Part 149 on the Federal Register of Legislation.

Consultation opens – rotorcraft air transport operations

We began consulting on new rules for rotorcraft air transport operations. The consultation is a combined consultation of Part 119 and 133 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. A webinar will be held on Thursday 2 August to provide further information and encourage people to provide their feedback to the consultation. Register to attend the webinar or find out more on our Consultation Hub.

We will also shortly start two consultations on proposed new rules for aeroplane air transport operations. One consultation will focus on Part 119 and 135 – smaller aeroplanes, and the second on Part 119 and 121 – larger aeroplanes. A webinar will be conducted for the smaller aeroplane consultation in mid August. Join our Flight operations mailing list to keep up to date.

Indemnification of delegations

On Monday 9 July 2018 the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport announced that indemnity will be provided to all flight examiner rating holders. Delegates, authorised persons and flight examiner rating holders will be indemnified from 1 September. More information is available on our website.

Consultations

Post-implementation review of the legislative framework for Part 139 - Aerodromes

We published a summary of feedback to proposed amendments as part of our post implementation review of Part 139 (1426AS). Part 139 contains the safety rules for aerodromes. We received 109 responses to the consultation in late 2017. A number of technical and policy issues will be resolved through working groups and reviewed by the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel before the final drafting of amendments. Read the summary of consultation on the Consultation Hub.

Instruments

We’ve published the Part 61 Manual of Standards Amendment Instrument 2018 (No. 1). The amendment of schedules 5 and 6 is part of a large body of work that has seen the implementation of the Flight Test Management system, updates to the Flight Examiner Handbook V2.1 (July 2018) and forms. Each part of the flight test and proficiency check system uses the same terms and format based on the new Part 61 MOS standards. View the amendment instrument on the CASA website.

Plume assessment

We will shortly be consulting on updates to how plume rise assessments are conducted. Advisory Circular AC 139-05 V3.0 will be the second revision and will replace the advisory circular issued in November 2012. Keep an eye out for the consultation on our Consultation Hub.

Exemptions

Flight examiner proficiency checks

New exemption (CASA EX70/18) extends the time an approved testing officer (ATO) has to complete a flight examiner proficiency check (EPC). It is consistent with previous arrangements (CASA EX133/16) which set the EPC due date for already transitioned ATOs according to their month and year of birth. View the exemption (CASA EX70/18) on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Flight training schools

We’ve published a new exemption that removes the requirement for a Part 141 or Part 142 operator to nominate an alternative key person when they are absent or unable to perform their duties.

View the exemption (CASA EX89/18) on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Guidance and advisory material

Remotely piloted aircraft systems/ unmanned aircraft and rockets

We updated two advisory circulars (ACs) related to drones.

AC 101-01 v2.1 Remotely piloted aircraft systems – licensing and operations – has been updated to include advice related to legislative instruments made in 2017 and updates approach and departure paths for controlled aerodromes. Approach and departure diagrams for non-controlled aerodromes have been removed. Read AC 101-01 v2.1.

AC 101-10 v1.3 Remotely piloted aircraft systems – operation of excluded RPA – extends the required notification period to three years for all drone pilots who are flying within the category of operations. It also changes the dimensions of approach and departure paths for controlled aerodromes. Read AC 101-10 v1.3.

Projects

Medical certification standards

We’ve published information on our project concerning the changes to medical requirements for pilots. Read more about Project FS 16/08.

Part 66 Manual of Standards

A project to make amendments to the Part 66 Manual of Standards is underway. Project MS 18/04 will consider miscellaneous amendments, editorial and/or machinery changes such as incorporation of new aircraft types.

 


Senate Committee for Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport RPAS/UAS Final Report

From correspondence received:


The Senate Committee for Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport has now released their final report on the Current and future regulatory requirements that impact on the safe commercial and recreational use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and associated systems.

The senate committee  makes 10 key recommendations. The report can be found here:

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Rural_and_Regional_Affairs_and_Transport/Drones/Report

Notice of Annual and General Meeting.

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 22nd September, 2018

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 8th September, 2018.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member(s)


 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th August  2018.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 9th August  2018 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 6th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 20th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - July 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Graeme Crawford

Recent debate about safety regulation and the general aviation sector has focused on the need for a sustainable and viable aviation industry. Implicit in this debate is the suggestion by some people that CASA does not support a sustainable and viable general aviation sector. I would like to assure everyone this is simply not true. There is no CASA agenda against general aviation and we regard the sector as a vital component of the national aviation community. Many of CASA’s staff are participants in general aviation, or started their careers in the sector, and have a practical understanding of the issues and challenges the sector faces. CASA can’t deliver solutions to the broader economic and social changes that are affecting parts of general aviation, but we can and will do our best to provide an appropriate safety regulatory framework that creates confidence in general aviation across the broader community. It is important that people from outside aviation have trust in the safety performance of general aviation and part of our job is to help ensure that trust is maintained.

CASA is focused on regulatory solutions that are both practical, proportionate and address aviation safety risk. We use available aviation sector information such as accident and incident data, surveillance findings and sector risk profiles to develop informed solutions. With that in mind the term ‘general aviation’ may not be granular enough as it covers a variety of aviation activities of which there are varying opinions within the aviation community regarding what is and what is not under the general aviation umbrella. Whilst this is challenging it is not unsurmountable and CASA will continue to develop regulatory solutions that consider risk appetite and safety consequences.

Finally, if there are people doubting our words about our commitment to general aviation then please look at our recent actions. Three major reforms this year to the aviation medical system are practical examples of reducing costs and impacts on the aviation community, particularly general aviation. The Basic Class 2 medical, which became available in early July 2018, is targeted at private pilots and makes getting an appropriate medical quicker, easier and cheaper. If you haven’t already please find out more about the Basic Class 2 and other medical reforms.

Best wishes
Graeme Crawford
(Shane Carmody is on leave)


Minister requires CASA to look at costs

CASA is required to consider economic and cost impacts on individuals, businesses and the community in its regulatory approach. That was a key message delivered by Deputy Prime Minister and Infrastructure and Transport Minister, Michael McCormack, to the general aviation summit in Wagga in July 2018. Mr McCormack said CASA was also required to take a pragmatic and proportionate approach to regulation as it applies to different aviation sectors. He said these requirements were contained in the Government’s Statement of Expectations issued to the CASA Board in March 2017. “These are not just words,” Mr McCormack said. “The statement of expectations is a legislative instrument and I expect the Board of CASA to ensure its requirements are met. I can also assure you that I will work in partnership with our aviation agencies and industry in tackling the challenges and opportunities for the general aviation sector, identified in the Government commissioned Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) study released late last year. These challenges are diverse. They range from fuel and maintenance costs, airport leases and charges; the impact of some regulatory changes and delays in CASA reviews to a lack of robust data on the general aviation sector. The study also showed that Australia is not alone in facing economic, demographic and regulatory factors affecting general aviation, with several major countries such as the UK, US and Canada also suffering declines in general aviation activity. BITRE’s recent release of the 2016 general aviation activity survey has showed some encouraging signs in terms of increased flying activity in some parts of general aviation such as aerial work, flying training and aerial mustering. But I acknowledge that there are still serious challenges facing general aviation. I will continue to listen and carefully consider the issues raised by people in the general aviation sector, and the Government and portfolio aviation agencies will respond appropriately. I am keen to hear from you on the key issues you want tackled by Government and industry that relate to general aviation operations in Australia.”

Go to Michael McCormack’s speech.

Comment now on new rotorcraft rules

A package of proposed new regulations and safety standards for the rotorcraft sector have been released for consultation. The package is made up of the proposed Parts 133 and 119 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, as well as the manual of standards for Part 133. Part 133 establishes the operating rules for rotorcraft conducting air transport operations and Part 119 covers air operator certificate requirements for air transport. The proposed changes for the first time create a specific set of operating rules for rotorcraft air transport operations. The central purpose of the new regulations is to enhance safety by improving standards in areas of known operational risk. Key changes include introducing an adaptable rotorcraft code of performance, specific mandatory simulator flight crew training requirements for certain rotorcraft, additional flight preparation and planning requirements, new fuel planning and fuel use rules, additional requirements for flights over water and medical transport requirements in line with international best practice and industry feedback. The Part 133 regulations will cover rotorcraft passenger charter, regular public transport, ambulance and cargo operations.

The proposed Part 119 introduces one set of safety requirements for all air transport operations. This removes the distinction between charter and regular public transport flights. Key changes include a requirement for all air transport operators to have an appropriately scaled training and checking system, an appropriately scaled safety management system, appropriately scaled human factors and non-technical skills training for all operational safety critical personnel and a safety manager. The way in which each operator meets these requirements will be matched to their size and complexity. In other words, CASA will not require a small, non-complex air operator to have the same systems and arrangements as a major airline or a large offshore helicopter operator. Eliminating the differences in safety standards between charter and regular public transport will open up opportunities for smaller operators in the future as they will be able to operate more types of scheduled flight services.

CASA is proposing the new Parts 133 and 119 would come into effect in 2021, along with the other new operational regulations covering aeroplane and aerial work operations. Consultation on the rotorcraft proposals is open until 21 August 2018. Aeroplane charter and regular public transport operators will be asked to comment on Part 119 and the aeroplane air transport rules in Parts 121 and 135 in a separate consultation package scheduled for mid-2018.

Get all the details on Parts 133 and 119 and have your say now.

Sport and recreation have their own regs

Australia’s first dedicated sport and recreational aviation safety regulations are now in place. The new Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations - Approved Self-Administering Aviation Organisations – was made in July 2018. Part 149 brings greater transparency, flexibility and certainty to this important aviation sector. The regulations replace a series of exemptions from the standard safety rules that have allowed individuals to operate sport and recreational aircraft. Part 149 focusses on the organisations that administer sport and recreational aviation activity and formalises diverse arrangements with these organisations that have been in place for many decades. The regulatory changes acknowledge the strong history of safe self-administration in sport and recreational aviation, as well as the popularity of the sector. They also acknowledge the high performance standards of modern sport and recreational aircraft. To operate under the new regulations sport and recreational organisations will need to apply for a Part 149 authorisation. CASA will work with organisations to develop the required documentation, which will outline how they will carry out safety-related self-administration functions. Functions covered will include flying operations, maintenance and pilot training and assessing. A manual of standards to support Part 149 is being developed and will be released for consultation during the second half of 2018.

Go to the Part 149 regulations.

Cockpit practice advice

Air operators should take an operational approach to maintaining the so-called ‘two in the cockpit’ practice. This is the advice from CASA following a review of the practice and consultation with the aviation industry. The operational approach to ‘two in the cockpit’ is in line with the position taken by the European Aviation Safety Agency. The ‘two in the cockpit’ practice was adopted as a precautionary approach in aircraft with a seating capacity of more than 50 passengers following the German Wings aircraft crash in early 2015. The review of the practice in Australia found there were unintended consequential risks, including the second person in the cockpit potentially distracting the pilot, making inadvertent contact with cockpit switches and taking cabin crew away from their safety role in the cabin. It was also found the practice complicated flight crew access to the cockpit and introduced an additional risk of flight deck incursion. The recommendation is for air operators to evaluate their own safety requirements and make an operational decision on whether to maintain ‘two in the cockpit’ in their standard operating procedures. CASA’s aviation medicine branch will continue to monitor pilot mental health and maintain a high level of awareness among pilots of mental health priorities and sources of assistance.

Spotlight on turbo clamps and couplings

Detailed new information on the best practices for maintaining turbocharged engine exhaust system clamps and couplings is now available. V-band couplings and clamps are used at the turbocharger exhaust exit to join to the tailpipe. The advice is also relevant to other piston aircraft engines that have V-band couplings and clamps in the exhaust system. The best practices guide was put together by a working group in the United States and has been published by the Federal Aviation Administration. CASA issued an airworthiness bulletin to highlight the guide. The guide covers typical installations, inspections, unsatisfactory conditions, failures and life limits. The need for the guide was driven by continued failures of V-Band clamps and couplings on turbocharged engines. In many cases the components are difficult to see during visual inspections. The guide has diagrams showing coupling and clamp failures including fractures, cupping and cracking. It provides recommended life-limits for particular types of V-Band couplings and includes useful maintenance tips and hints.

Find out about V-Band clamps and couplings.

Flight examiners win indemnity

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has given its commitment to complete a smooth and quick transition to the new Flight Examiner Rating system. This follows the announcement that CASA indemnity will be provided to all Flight Examiner Rating holders. The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Michael McCormack, announced the indemnity decision at the general aviation summit in Wagga. The new indemnity arrangements for Flight Examiner Rating holders will become effective from 1 September 2018. Approved Testing Officers will retain their current indemnity arrangements until they transition to a Flight Examiner Rating. About 800 Flight Examiner Ratings have already been issued by CASA, with about 260 Approved Testing Officers due to complete the transition by the end of August 2018. CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, welcomed the Government’s decision on indemnity for Flight Examiner Rating holders. “CASA has been working hard behind the scenes to secure this decision as we understood the importance of this insurance indemnity for people working in flying training,” Mr Carmody said. “CASA will now complete the transition to Flight Examiner Ratings quickly and smoothly to minimise any impact on flying training. CASA appreciates the vital role the flying training sector plays in the aviation industry and will provide necessary support as these changes are implemented.”

Find out more about flight examiner indemnity.

Port Macquarie airspace review

A review of the airspace around Port Macquarie aerodrome has found there are no changes required to current airspace arrangements, although some improvements can be made. Airspace users identified the need for targeted education about frequency congestion and correct radio calls and procedures. There was also feedback about the need for additional aerodrome infrastructure such as a full length, parallel taxiway. The review, conducted by CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation, made three recommendations. CASA flying operations inspectors should conduct a safety assessment and thorough stakeholder consultation to determine whether the broadcast area should be retained or disestablished. The Port Macquarie – Hastings Council should continue with plans to construct a parallel taxiway. The Port Macquarie – Hastings Council should investigate the very high frequency ‘black spot’ at the southern end of the runway and identify and implement appropriate mitigators.

Read the Port Macquarie airspace review.

Make safety briefings a success

Professionalism, credibility and eye contact can be essential elements to delivering a successful passenger safety briefing on aircraft. Cabin crew members need to show safety leadership through body language and good public speaking techniques when making a safety briefing. They also need to show enthusiasm and to avoid hurrying briefings. This advice is contained in a new cabin safety bulletin issued by CASA on getting the most impact from cabin safety bulletins. International research continues to show passengers can incur serious injuries and death from an aircraft accident because they do not pay attention to cabin safety briefings. A National Transportation Safety Board accident report on US Airways flight 1549 that landed on the Hudson River in 2009, noted only about 10 of the 150 passengers retrieved their own life jackets after impact. The report indicated almost 70 percent of passengers did not watch any of the pre-flight safety briefing, with the most frequently cited reason for inattention being that passengers flew frequently and believed they were familiar with the equipment on the aircraft. Research has also found passengers do not take notice of briefings due to their confidence in the safety of flying, a belief that crew will take care of them and a poor delivery of briefings. Airlines can use surveys of passengers to test understanding of safety briefings.

Get more on safety briefings.

In Brief

  • A panel of writers and editors is being set up to provide CASA with additional communication resources. The writers and editors will help develop guidance material, advice, fact sheets, case studies and information campaigns for the aviation community. They will be skilled in communicating technical and regulatory information in plain, easy to understand language. The communicators will have experience in areas including flying, aeronautical engineering, aviation management, drones and psychology. A tender process to establish the panel is being run through the Australian Government’s AusTender system.
  • CASA has published a summary of feedback to proposed updates to Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Part 139 contains the safety rules for aerodromes. A number of technical and policy issues will be resolved through working groups and reviewed by the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel before the final drafting of amendments.
  • A project to make amendments to the Part 66 Manual of Standards is underway. This project is to make miscellaneous amendments, editorial and/or machinery changes.
  • An exemption has been extended to allow pilots to log co-pilot flight time when operating single-pilot certificated aircraft. The new exemption expires on 30 June 2021.
  • Jeff Boyd finished as Chair of the CASA Board on 30 June 2018. Jeff joined CASA in July 2014 as Deputy Chair under Alan Hawke, assuming the role of Chair in July 2015.

Seminars develop pilot skills

All pilots should be looking to enhance their skills. The new series of AvSafety seminars provides support for developing skills in three keys areas - communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The focus is on operations at non-controlled aerodromes, with a practical scenario used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours. Discussion looks at how threat and error management techniques complement the technical aspects of flying an aircraft. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In August 2018 seminars are being held at:

  • Caloundra*
  • Camden
  • Darwin
  • Gove
  • Katherine
  • Lilydale
  • Parkes
  • Redcliffe*
  • Tyabb
  • Wollongong

*Redcliffe and Caloundra will include a brief on the World Parachute Championships being held on the Gold Coast between 4 - 14 October 2018.

Book a place at your local AvSafety seminar.

Seminars for engineers

Four engineering seminars are being held in August 2018. These seminars will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. Engineering seminars are at:

  • Airlie Beach
  • Gove
  • Mackay
  • Victoria River Downs

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.

New regulation for sport and recreational aviation (Part 149) [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

**New regulation for sport and recreational aviation (Part 149)**

16 July 2018

Sport and recreational aviation has received a new level of recognition in
Australia, with the making of the first aviation regulation designed for
the sector.

The regulation formalises co-regulatory arrangements that have existed for
many decades with sport and recreational aviation organisations, but
previously only in conditional exemptions from the standard aviation rules.

The new Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR)
brings more transparency, flexibility and certainty for the sector. The
sector incorporates a range of activities that cover non-standard aircraft
types such as balloons, gliders, historic, experimental, ex-military and
replica aircraft.

The regulatory change acknowledges the strong history of safe
self-administration in sport and recreational aviation, and the popularity
of sport and recreational aviation today. It also acknowledges the high
performance standards of today's sport and recreational aircraft.

The new Part 149 regulation recognises sport and recreational aviation as a
standard sector of aviation in Australia.

**Next steps**

To operate under Part 149, sport and recreational organisations need to
apply for a Part 149 authorisation. CASA will work with organisations to
develop their documentation, which will outline how they will safely carry
out important aspects of their safety-related self-administration
functions. This could include flying operations, maintenance and training
and assessing.

CASA will shortly open a consultation on a Part 149 Manual of Standards,
which will need to be in place before organisations can operate under the
new ruleset.

Finalising the Part 149 regulation has been a priority for CASA's
regulatory program and has been developed over many years in close
consultation with industry.

View CASR Part 149 on the Federal Register of Legislation
<https://mailinglist.casa.gov.au/lists/lt.php?tid=PvvALx9GWS+tNzs3tVPnqfio3F2vCprZuus1bUJ0dWDXDhfKaYGcM6pGtu6jYXKH>
.

RPAS - SSRP workshop [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED] presentations

Presentations conducted at the RPAS SRP in Sydney  can be found via the Documents Tab on the AMAS Inc website and via the direct links below:


and

Once the finalised Risk Register is received from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, the document will be circulated to the greater membership for feedback.

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems - Sector Safety Risk Profile workshop [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Coordination and Safety Systems Branch, through its Strategic Analysis team and CASA’s subject matter experts, identifies risk factors and monitors trends in the Australian aviation system. To enhance CASA’s capability to monitor trends and risk factors, CASA has developed a tool for aviation industry sector safety risk profiles which provide a strategic view of risks in a defined industry sector and a platform for the coordinated response and management of risks across a sector. This tool requires the application of the risk profiling methodology to a data set relating to a defined sector. The defined sector CASA is currently reviewing is Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems.

Following an initial workshop conducted in Brisbane (March 2018) it was decided to  conduct four workshops to address the risks in the following subcategories:

·         ReOC operators – non-complex operations

·         Excluded category

·         Sports / Recreation (Model Aircraft) Part 101.G

·         ReOC operators – complex operations  

 

CASA will be holding a workshop at the CASA Office in Sydney to identify the risks associated with Sports/ Rec category operations. We would like to invite your society  to participate in the upcoming workshop. The workshop forms an important part of the sector risk profile development process. 

 

The core purpose of the workshop will be to identify risk causes, sources and hazards using the combined knowledge of industry representatives and CASA Reference Group. Sector safety risk profiling is a CASA initiative to identify sector specific risks and to develop strategies to treat these risks with the involvement of the sector participants. It also provides the opportunity for CASA and the industry to collaboratively work on the management of risks and to adopt flexible treatment measures that suit the unique characteristics of the operation.

  

CASA values your time and industry knowledge and appreciates your societies contribution to this initiative. Workshop materials and agenda will be sent to you closer to the date of the workshop.

Thanks in anticipation of your society participating in the workshop.

The CASA Briefing - June 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

By now most people are probably aware that I have been permanently appointed as CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety for a five year term. I am honoured to have been given the opportunity to lead CASA through a time of challenges and changes. My vision is for CASA to be an open and transparent regulator and one the aviation industry finds it easy to do business with. I am especially keen to improve our service delivery. People coming to CASA for approvals, licences or certificates have every right to expect efficient, streamlined and timely service. To do this we will continue to improve our systems and processes. Streamlining our systems and centralising data will also make us more effective in continuing to improve aviation safety. The correct analysis of data provides an opportunity to create a new proactive model of risk management. We want to be able to take a risk-based, rather than a knee-jerk approach to safety management. A key element to this approach will be to keep the aviation community ‘in the loop’ about the issues we see emerging from the data and from our broader sectoral analysis.

A current challenge for CASA is the growth of unmanned aircraft, or drones. Drones have enormous potential for making aviation and society safer, by doing many of the repetitive and dangerous aerial jobs without risking human lives. However, this emerging industry poses challenges to us as the regulator because we now have to deal with both emerging technology and a new group of people who have had little or no exposure to aviation. One of my priorities will be bringing this new group into the broader aviation community, so that together we maintain and improve Australia’s aviation safety performance.

I must emphasise that I understand CASA needs to do things differently. In particular, I know many people are frustrated by delays in some of our regulation reform processes. These have been too slow and too long and not sufficiently focused on practical, common-sense outcomes. However, I am confident that by working co-operatively with the aviation community we can make positive progress and deliver effective change that achieves safe skies for all.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety


Consultation reboot for better results

A substantial overhaul of the way CASA consults with the aviation community has been announced. Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody has set up a new body to ‘reboot’ consultation processes. The changes will streamline consultation and ensure the aviation community is directly involved in the early setting of safety and regulatory objectives and policies. CASA will now get timely advice on current and emerging issues from a cross section of aviation organisations. A new consultation body, known as the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel, is being established from 1 July 2017. It is to be made up of senior representatives from Qantas Airways, Virgin Australia, the Australian Airports Association, The Australian Aviation Associations Forum, the Regional Aviation Association of Australia and Recreational Aviation Australia. The Aviation Safety Advisory Panel will provide CASA with objective, high-level advice from the aviation community on issues with significant implications for aviation safety and the way CASA performs its functions. CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel will become the avenue through which CASA seeks aviation community input on regulatory and policy approaches. He said: “Most importantly, it will be the forum through which we seek to agree on the objectives and policy outcomes – before we then call our technical experts to do the detailed work. CASA’s overriding responsibility for aviation safety leadership, however, means that there will always be limits. We cannot appease everyone, nor meet every request as regulatory activities are inherently challenging and CASA ultimately has to make the call on major safety questions. My intention is that once we have settled on a position we will stick to it and deliver on what we have said we will deliver. If we can do this, we will maintain the trust and respect of the aviation community as a whole. I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has served on consultation panels in the past.”

Take part in our service survey now

CASA is committed to improving the delivery of regulatory services to the aviation community. To achieve this goal we need the help now of everyone who uses CASA’s services. A short survey is underway to give CASA a better understanding of the service needs and preferences of people in the aviation community. The results of the survey will be used to make practical changes to CASA’s service delivery systems and processes. Questions in the survey include how easy it is to obtain CASA services, the level of satisfaction with service delivery, how services should be delivered, how CASA should contact people and how applications for services should be submitted. The survey is multiple choice, with the option to provide written comments as well. All results from the survey will be anonymous, unless people choose to provide contact details. The survey is open until 5 July 2017. Anyone who would prefer a paper version of the survey can request a copy by sending an email to: industryofficer@casa.gov.au.

Take part in the service survey now.

Phone service improvements

From July 2017 CASA is making changes to improve the way phone calls are managed. Calls to all CASA 13 and 1300 numbers will now be diverted through to 131 757. The separate 1300 numbers for aviation medicine and licensing and registration will be redirected to a central telephone menu. This means 131 757 will become CASA’s primary contact number and should be used by all callers. People who call will be able to choose from a range of options, so that enquiries can quickly be directed to the most appropriate place in CASA. Options will include services relating to licensing, aircraft registration, aviation medicine, regional offices and unmanned aircraft. Callers to CASA will not need to do anything differently but they will notice a difference in the way calls are managed.

Pilots to play key role in new safety seminars

A new series of the popular AvSafety seminars for pilots starts from July 2017. The new series will get pilots talking about key safety issues by looking at previous accidents and incidents where the outcomes were both good and bad. This season of seminars will concentrate on pilot decision making during pre-flight, in-flight and approach and landing. Discussions will look at flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents and incidents covering each phase of flight will be set out, with a mix of fixed wing and helicopter events to be examined. The aim of the seminars will be to get pilots thinking about their flying behaviour and decision making and to offer ideas and resources to support safe operations. CASA’s team of safety advisers will ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer lessons learned. The seminars have been developed with the support of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, Airservices Australia, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and the Bureau of Meteorology. A representative from Bureau of Meteorology will attend some seminars to provide information on the new area forecasts format.

In July there are seven AvSafety seminars at: Port Pirie, Griffith, Wagga, Ballarat, Gawler, Moruya and Lilydale. The Port Pirie seminar will be based on the previous lessons for life format.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.

Flight test system changes

Changes are being made to the flight test notification system. The new system, called Flight Test Management, replaces the current Flight Test Notification System from 3 July 2017. The new system will be accessed through the CASA on-line self-service portal. It means all flight examiner records and flight test data will be managed in one system and accessed through the self-service portal. Some paper-based processes will be replaced, eligibility validation will be provided and hard copy paper requirements will be reduced. The major steps for conducting flight tests and proficiency checks will remain the same. All flight examiners should ensure they have checked their qualifications are up to date in the CASA self-service portal as the new system starts. There are also changes to the flight examiner rating course and professional development program, flight test and proficiency check standards, and updates to guidance documentation. The training course for people who want to gain a flight examiner rating or flight examiner endorsement has been re-developed and is now made up of five phases. It provides for recognition of existing flight examiner qualifications.

Go to the CASA self-service portal.

Support for helicopter mustering safety

Everyone involved in helicopter mustering needs a new specialised safety information card. The card provides information on safety around mustering helicopters on the ground and in the air, passenger safety, emergencies and hiring a helicopter for mustering. The card folds down to pocket size to make it easy to carry and hand out to non-aviation people involved in helicopter mustering. Simple illustrations are used to delivery safety messages about 11 key issues relating to safety around mustering helicopters. These include approaching and leaving the helicopter, riding a horse or motorbike near a helicopter, awareness of helicopter blades, sloping ground and avgas drums. Passenger safety focuses on entry and exit, seat belts and seating, doors, headsets and dangerous goods. Four good reasons are set out for hiring a helicopter musting operator that meets all the civil aviation legal and regulatory requirements. People hiring helicopters are advised to ask the operator for a copy of their air operator certificate.

Order a copy of the helicopter mustering card now.

Switch now to new limited category certificates

Owners and operators of ex-military aircraft have until late July 2017 to transition to a limited category certificate under Part 132 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Part 132 commenced on 28 January 2017, with transition to the new regulation required by 28 July 2017. Warbirds currently operating on an experimental certificate must transition to a limited category certificate. Under a limited category certificate operations and airworthiness authorisations will be managed by a self-administering organisation in cooperation with CASA. The rules enable other types of standard category aircraft, such as historic and replica aircraft, to operate on a limited category certificate. This type of certificate offers flexibility for personal flights and recreational purposes. As a result a number of people have already made the switch to the new rules. The new rules apply to the owners, operators and pilots of ex-military (warbirds), certain historic and replica aircraft, the owners of any other aircraft certified in the limited category and individuals and organisations that conduct or sell adventure flights in warbirds.

Find out more about the rules for limited category aircraft.

Spotlight on aircraft weighing

Twelve key points to remember when weighing aircraft have been set out in new advice from CASA. There have been recent reports of some general aviation aircraft being prepared for weighing using improper practices. Reports also indicate the preparation of aircraft and the weighing are not being documented properly. This makes it difficult to determine the configuration of the aircraft in which it was last weighed and throws doubts over the validity of the load data sheet. The purpose of aircraft weighing is to determine the baseline empty weight and empty weight centre of gravity of aircraft, with the information published in a load data sheet to provide for the accurate loading of aircraft before flight. Aircraft manufacturer instructions for weighing should be followed if available, with the airworthiness bulletin from CASA providing recommended practices. The recommendations include the state of the aircraft at weighing, configuration, equipment lists, fuel, oil and other liquids and levelling. Weighing documentation should be clear on what was and what was not included in the empty weight of the aircraft. This is important for the future comparison of weighing information.

Find out more about aircraft weighing.


The Bundaberg Aeromodeller's long weekend Spring time fly-in is on again this year. 
There are camping sites with toilets and hot showers, lunch & dinner Saturday and Sunday available, canteen and a pilot making workshop for those with a crafty bent and want to learn how to make heads and bodies

All types of aircraft welcome with a friendly fun fly format.
Bundaberg Aeromodellers welcome all flyers who follow CASA, the club by-laws and are have valid insurance with whoever. 
Because we allow any insurance, MAAA chooses to stop their member's insurance at our gate. However, if you want to fly here and share in our hospitality and facilities you can be signed in as a provisional member and be fully insured for the weekend.
For further information and bookings, contact the president - Wal. Details on the flyer

Bundy 2018  Oct  Event

AMAS Inc UPDATE / RENEWAL INFORMATION 2018-2019


The AMAS Inc Committee hope that the past year has treated you well and that you had many happy landings. AMAS Inc continues to grow with members in every state and territory and we hope that you'll continue to renew with the society and enjoy the relaxed fun community that makes up this society.

 

As many of you may be aware, the CASA has for quite some time, formally approved the society's application,to allow FPV flying among other matters including area approvals and flying displays.  AMAS Inc works  with the regulator and the society also engages with other federal,state and local government entities.The AMAS Inc  is also a member of the ACUO. 


 Member fees.

On June 1st early membership renewal is open for the 2018/2019 financial year covering the period July 1st 2018 until June 30th 2019 offering all the benefits that AMAS membership provides members and clubs.

The fees are as follows (and are again reduced!):

 

12    Month Membership $45 Senior and $10 Juniors


Renewals can be registered here:


http://www.amas.org.au/wspMemberRegistration-Join.aspx

 

The Future.

 

Our hobby is about family, friends and having fun. We will continue to provide insurance and other benifits at an affordable price without compromising service to you our valued member  whilst reaffirming our commitment to promoting the family and friends aspect of the hobby.

  

Now is a great time to join up potential members, especially juniors!

.

The AMAS Committee hope the junior fee reduction will encourage the younger generation to embrace the joys of aeromodelling in the coming years. Furthermore partnering with the D1-Store, in providing member discounts, is another component of the society in which we believe adds value and encouragement in the membership.

 

Some of you expressed an interest in joining the committee, as noted in the member survey last year and we look forward to hearing from you. Simply phone of email the secretary for more information. You do not need any experience and we'd like people from all walks of life from across Australia to participate. So what are you waiting for ...  Get involved today!

 

Finally we would remind all members and clubs to check out our website(as it is a 'Live' document) for any changes  that have occurred.


Remember: "Get up and fly"!  and "Safety is no accident".


 

On behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

10 dollar junior fee
Porter boys full page  May- 18

CASA Briefing Newsletter - May 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


Date of Publication: 
25 May 2018

The CASA Briefing, your monthly CASA update

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

CASA is continuing to work hard to bring improvements to the aviation community in the way safety regulation is delivered. Key changes have already been made to aviation medicals, with more change - in the form of the basic class two - imminent. A lot of effort is also underway to lift our service delivery, with a focus on providing a better and easier delivery of services online. The first steps in new online service delivery are due to be taken in the middle of this year, starting with a streamlined process to obtain aviation reference numbers. Very importantly, we have committed to providing a user-friendly guidance document for major new regulatory parts, such as the operations rules in Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. All these initiatives, and more, will lighten the regulatory load on everyone in aviation in Australia.

On top of these reforms we are working on a rationalisation of the way we charge fees for regulatory services. I cannot offer to abolish fees as we are required by government to recover a proportion of the cost of delivering services, but I can promise we will make the fee structure clearer and more predictable. There are currently around 360 different regulatory service fees and we are aiming to reduce this number down to around 100. We are proposing as many fees as possible to be fixed, rather than based on an hourly rate. This means the aviation community will have much more clarity around the charges to be paid to CASA for regulatory services. In line with Australian Government policy, CASA will publicly consult on proposed changes through a cost recovery implementation statement, which is due to be released later this year.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


New fuel rules coming soon

New rules covering minimum fuel requirements for all Australian aircraft start on 8 November 2018. The new rules re-introduce a fixed fuel reserve requirement, reduce reserve requirements for day visual flight rules operations in small piston or turboprop aeroplanes, require pilots to conduct in-flight fuel management with regular fuel quantity checks and if required declare ‘mayday fuel’, and introduce ‘additional fuel’ which simplifies the planning requirements for fuel contingencies. The changes more closely align Australian fuel rules with the International Civil Aviation Organization standards and recommended practices. Many pilots and operators are already complying with standards in the new rules as they have been in CASA guidelines for some time. The changes remove uncertainty by clarifying what must be done legally. The mayday fuel declaration aims to increase safety. It alerts other airspace users to a potential fuel problem facing an aircraft in their vicinity and ensures priority is given to that aircraft, reducing the chances of an accident. Mayday fuel is not aimed at setting conditions to prosecute pilots or operators and a declaration does not automatically mean that emergency services will be mobilised. The fixed fuel reserve for day visual flight rules operations in small piston or turboprop aeroplanes will be 30 minutes.

Get all the details on the new fuel rules.

Stop bars mean stop

Pilots are being reminded of the importance of never crossing an illuminated aerodrome stop bar. Stop bars are a series of red lights co-located with runway holding point markings on taxiways that show where an aircraft or vehicle is required to stop when it does not have a clearance to proceed onto a runway. Taxiing aircraft must stop and hold at all lighted stop bars. Aircraft may only proceed further when given a clearance by air traffic control and when the stop bar lights have been switched off. If stop bar lights are not switched off after a clearance has been given pilots must seek clarification from air traffic control. Pilots must never allow their aircraft to cross an illuminated stop bar. The reminder about the importance of stop bars follows a number of instances of illuminated stop bars being crossed at Perth Airport. Pilots have been receiving clearance to enter a runway but are not waiting for the stop bar lights to be turned off. Pilots are also not challenging air traffic control when the stop bars remain on. Stop bars are a defence against runway incursions, which are a serious risk to safety.

Find out more about stop bars in an Airservices Australia fact sheet.

Helicopter pilots urged not to push on

Helicopter pilots are being urged to make a precautionary landing if a flight isn’t quite right. A campaign has been launched with the theme: ‘don’t push it, land it’. The campaign is supported by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and the Australian Helicopter Industry Association. All helicopter pilots - no matter their experience or the type of helicopter they fly - should take an early decision to make a precautionary landing if they experience a situation that just isn’t right. ATSB Chief Commissioner, Greg Hood, said making an early decision to land during the onset of an abnormal situation will reduce the likelihood of an accident from happening. “Pilots should always take advantage of their helicopter’s unique ability to land almost anywhere when things aren’t quite right in flight,” Mr Hood says. “If you’re faced with deteriorating weather or if something just doesn’t feel right, don’t push it, make a precautionary landing. If you do decide to push on, it could be the beginning of an accident sequence.” CASA supports and encourages pilots to make a precautionary landing when it is safe to do so. CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody says: “We have seen a number of fatal accidents where had the pilot decided to land, then the accident may not have occurred. CASA will not take any disciplinary action against a pilot if they need to make a precautionary landing, provided it is performed in good faith, as safely as possible and it did not endanger anyone.” President of the Australian Helicopter Industry Association, Peter Crook, says pressures and fear of scrutiny are often the impetus for pilots to ‘push on’ which can see them fly into an uncomfortable situation. Businessman and helicopter pilot Dick Smith has generously donated $20,000 to the helicopter association to help promote the safety messages of ‘don’t push it, land it’.

Read more about the don’t push it, land it campaign.

Take care with Cessna seats

Operators and maintainers are being reminded of the importance of properly maintaining and checking pilot seats and adjustment mechanisms in single engine Cessna aircraft. Action is needed to make sure seats do not move inadvertently during flight. There have been numerous accidents - several fatal - that have occurred due to inadequate inspection and maintenance practices on seat assemblies fitted to single engine Cessna aircraft. Problems occur due to incorrect placement of seat stops, worn seat adjustment mechanisms, poor seat latch/track engagement and the installation of unapproved parts. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA strongly recommends a number of actions. Maintainers need to be aware of airworthiness directives and special inspection requirements relating to pilot seats. They also need to make sure the correct components and parts are fitted to seats, such as seat stops and cotter pins, and to verify previously installed parts are genuine and correct. It is very important to ensure the primary seat locking mechanism, the secondary seat stop and rear track seat stops are correctly positioned. Pilots and passengers must check seat adjustment, locking and security during pre-flight checks. Care must be taken to ensure flight bags, headset cables, seat covers and other gear does not foul seat actuating or locking mechanisms, which could cause inadvertent seat movement.

Learn more in the Cessna seats airworthiness bulletin.

New wasp warning

A warning has been issued about a risk to aircraft safety from a new type of wasp. The key hole wasp is nesting in the Brisbane airport area and has been found at Emerald aerodrome. There is a concern the species could spread to other airports by aircraft or shared ground support equipment. Key hole wasps make nests based from alluvial sediments such as construction site material rather than soil, with peak nesting occurring during warmer temperatures and higher rainfall. The insects are active by day, although airport lighting can extend their activities. Nests are built cell by cell, usually at the furthest point from an opening greater than 5mm. A wasp nest can completely block aircraft pitot tubes, fuel tank vents and drains. Wasp nests and insect blockages in pitot tubes are not limited to small aircraft. In an updated airworthiness bulletin CASA makes a number of recommendations including the importance of installing pitot/static and vent covers any time an aircraft is parked. Probe covers should be regularly checked for damage. Pilots should be aware that on-ground pre-flight air data module BITE tests and/or computer checks will usually not test pitot probes or static vents for physical blockages. Areas where aircraft are stored or maintained should be regularly checked for wasp nests.

Read the updated wasp airworthiness bulletin.

Funds for better positioning technology

The Federal Government has allocated $160.9 million to deliver a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) to improve the reliability and the accuracy of positioning data from five metres to 10 centimetres across Australia and its maritime zone. In addition, there will be a $64 million investment in the national positioning infrastructure capability, which will complement SBAS to improve GPS to an accuracy as precise as 3cm in areas of Australia with access to mobile coverage. The Minister for Resources and Northern Australia Matt Canavan said the funding in this year’s federal budget would support aviation. “The increased reliability provided by better GPS will improve safety for aircraft flying into regional and remote aerodromes, such as the Royal Flying Doctor Service fleet,” Mr Canavan said. “It will reduce the impact of weather on flight cancellations and diversions and improve the safety of landings. This is a practical investment to improve the lives of Australians and make businesses more productive. This technology provides instant, reliable and accurate positioning information, anytime and anywhere around Australia.”

Find out more about SBAS.

Drone review calls for registration and training

A mandatory drone registration scheme and online training for recreational drone flyers have been supported by a CASA review of the safety regulation of remotely piloted aircraft. The review indicated CASA should continue to support work by the manufacturers of remotely piloted aircraft to use geo-fencing technology to prevent drones operating in non-permitted areas such as at or near major airports and in certain classes of restricted airspace. The review was conducted at the request of the Minister for Infrastructure and Transport. Submissions to a 2017 discussion paper on drone regulation informed the review. In supporting mandatory drone registration, the review determined a registration process must be simple and the system easy to use. Data integrity would be paramount – including a requirement for an applicant to confirm their identity by using the Australian Government’s online document verification service. Owners would be required to renew their drone registration every three years. The review supported recreational drone flyers being required to undertake a simple online course on safe drone operations, followed by a quiz that has a minimum pass mark. This would address the issue of an increasing number of drone flyers who are unaware of the relevant drone rules, have a poor understanding of the rules or wrongly interpret the rules. CASA has not yet taken final decisions on possible changes to the drone safety regulations and any proposals will be subject to public consultation.

Read the drone regulatory review.

In Brief

  • Responses to consultation on the recommendations of the independent review of aviation fatigue rules for air operators and pilots have been published. The responses are currently being analysed before CASA finalises a position on the new fatigue rules, which will include an implementation timetable. The aim is to have key changes in place during 2018. Read the responses on CASA’s consultation hub.
  • A total of 298 submissions were made in response to consultation on a new proposal that would change the guidance for radio frequency use at uncharted aerodromes. CASA is reviewing the comments and will make a final decision on the multicom issue as soon as possible. Comments can be read now.
  • Thirty responses received during consultation on the post implementation review of Part 145 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations have been published. Part 145, which covers requirements for aircraft and aeronautical product maintenance, was first introduced in June 2011. The responses are on CASA’s consultation hub.
  • An advisory circular is now available to provide Australian air operators with guidance on performance-based communication and surveillance (PBCS). It explains the basic principles of PBCS and related flight planning and operational issues. It also includes a compliance checklist. An Australian operator is authorised by CASA to operate on PBCS routes in oceanic airspace if they meet the equipment and performance standards and other conditions. PBCS routes may be more favourable in terms of flight efficiency.
  • The exemption for dual flight checks before solo flights by student pilots has been extended. The extension continues to allow student pilots to conduct a solo flight if they have successfully completed a dual flight check within 30 days prior to the solo flight, instead of within the 14 days as required by the Part 61 regulations. The exemption also applies to flight instructors when authorising solo flights.
  • Advice on spark plug insulator cracking has been updated. Changes have been made to an airworthiness bulletin on spark plugs to more accurately reflect the factors behind cracking. The bulletin looks at detonation, spark plug maintenance and handling, pre-ignition and other causes.

Safety seminars for pilots

The popular lessons for life safety seminars for pilots continue in June 2018. There are seminars being held at:

  • Maitland – Yorke Peninsula
  • Scone
  • Cessnock
  • Bunbury
  • Hamilton
  • Horsham
  • Port Pirie.

The seminars will explore three major themes: flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents will be used to take pilots through many of the safety-related decisions faced at three crucial phases of flight - before departing, in-flight, and at the crucial arrival and landing phase. CASA's safety advisers ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons. In Ballina a special seminar is being held on radio procedures in the area. Jetstar will talk about their local operational procedures.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar now.

Seminars for engineers

Engineering seminars are being held in June 2018 at Darwin and Archerfield. These seminars will look at a range of topics including airworthiness issues, specialist maintenance certification, regulations and Part 66 licences. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. The Darwin seminar is on Wednesday 20 June 2018 and Archerfield on Tuesday 26 June 2018.

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.

Flight instructor safety workshops

New workshops are being held to support pilots who hold an instructor rating. The workshops will include lectures, case studies, discussion topics and group exercises. Some of the topics covered will be maintaining good situational awareness in the training environment, anticipating student actions, understanding Part 61 requirements, use of GPS in the instructional environment, on-line resources for instructors and students and maximising the benefit of flight reviews. CASA’s aviation safety advisers will run the free workshops, which will include time to answers questions and listen to feedback. The next flight instructor workshops are being held at Archerfield on Thursday 14 June and Friday 15 June 2018.

Register now for a flight instructor workshop.

D1 Store-AMAS inc member discount


D1 Store, in collaboration with the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc committee are delighted to offer AMAS Inc members a 10% discount on DJI products. Members can visit D1 Store, present your current AMAS Inc membership card (Ecard) to receive the discount which can be used either in store or online. 

For more information:

Kind regards,

The team at AMAS Inc and the D1 Store.

D1  Store  Logo

CASA Drone Safety Review.

CASA has released its report on its recent review of drone regulation.

The key recommendations are;

- mandatory RPA registration in Australia for RPA’s weighing more than 250 grams.

- a simple online course for recreational and excluded category RPA operators on safe RPA operations, followed by a quiz with a minimum pass mark.

- CASA’s education and training framework around the issue of a remote pilot licence should continue.

- continue to support RPA manufacturers’ efforts to utilise geo-fencing technology to prevent RPA operations in areas where operations are not permitted, including at or near major airports and certain classes of restricted airspace.

- participation, where appropriate, in international forums to stay abreast of global trends and participate in trials of the technology where feasible.

- work with Airservices Australia to ensure the development of standard data on airspace.

- deliver a RPAS roadmap to articulate how to safely integrate RPAs into the Australian airspace system, including content on unmanned traffic management systems

More information regarding the matter can be found here:


https://www.casa.gov.au/aircraft/standard-page/drone-safety-review

CASA Briefing Newsletter - April 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing - Your monthly CASA update

Update from CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

Everyone in aviation can be proud of the new top six safety ranking given to Australia by the International Civil Aviation Organization. The ranking follows the latest International Civil Aviation Organization audit of Australia's aviation safety system, carried out in late 2017. The audit delivered a 95 per cent safety oversight score, which we must now work to maintain. This means Australia currently ranks sixth out of International Civil Aviation Organization member states for effective safety oversight. The International Civil Aviation Organization assesses a nation's safety oversight capabilities by looking at aviation legislation, licensing, operations, civil aviation organisational structures, air navigation and accident investigation. The high ranking demonstrates Australia has a robust aviation safety system supported by public sector agencies with a deep commitment to achieving the best possible safety outcomes. Credit for the ranking also goes to the commitment to safety by the people and organisations who make up Australia's aviation community. It is your day-to-day work, delivering safety during every flight and every aviation activity, that makes Australian skies amongst the safest in the world. Naturally, I am proud of the role the CASA has played in lifting Australia's safety ranking and I thank all staff for their contribution. Tribute also goes to the contributions and efforts of the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities, Airservices Australia, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, the Australia Maritime Safety Authority and the Bureau of Meteorology.

Get more information on the International Civil Aviation Organization's Universal Safety Oversight Audit Programme.

I am very pleased the implementation of the recent change which allows designated aviation medical examiners (DAMEs) to issue on the spot class two medicals is progressing well. So far more than 110 DAMEs have completed the short online training course to become eligible to issue class two medicals on the spot. I know a number of on the spot medicals have already been issued to pilots by these DAMEs and the numbers will grow in coming weeks. The range of reforms we are making to the aviation medical system will make life a little easier for many pilots by cutting red tape. I understand the pressures that are on the general aviation community in particular and I will continue to strive to find ways for CASA to ease any regulatory burdens.

I had the pleasure recently to attend an industry function in Darwin with the CASA Board and to be able to have robust discussions with around 50 local aviation identities on the challenges they are facing. The CASA Board also took time to visit Hardy's Aviation and Air North. We are grateful for the time they provided, their insights and their suggestions. The candid conversations were a great value to us all.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Latest News

New multicom proposal

Pilots are being asked to comment on a fresh proposal on the use of radio frequencies near uncharted aerodromes in class G airspace. The proposal would permit the use of the multicom frequency 126.7 MHz in the circuit area of aerodromes not published on an aeronautical chart. The circuit area would be within a three nautical mile radius of uncharted aerodromes and 1,500 feet above ground level. The use of 126.7 MHz for uncharted aerodromes will only be a recommendation and single-user aerodromes/ALAs may still use the area VHF frequency where airmanship dictates this as appropriate. CASA will recommend pilots capable of monitoring two frequencies monitor 126.7 MHz in addition to the area VHF frequency when operating at an altitude which could generate a conflict with the circuit area of an uncharted aerodrome. CASA will recommend that 'busy', currently uncharted, aerodromes be published on aeronautical charts.

Comments on the proposal should be submitted through the CASA consultation hub by close of business 14 May 2018.

Spark plug damage warning

There has been an increase in reports of spark plugs in aircraft engines suffering physical damage. CASA has released an airworthiness bulletin looking at issues relating to piston engine spark plug insulator cracking. Maintenance organisations and engineers are advised to consider undertaking specific maintenance to detect and give warning of possible adverse internal engine wear. The primary contributing factors for spark plug insulator cracking are vibration from detonation, mishandling, improper cleaning or gapping and thermal shock from pre-ignition. Proper magneto-to-engine timing is also an important factor. As timing is affected by wear it should be checked and reset at intervals specified in the engine manufacturer's instructions. Lean-of-peak operation where precise control over engine performance cannot be assured is to be avoided to negate the possibility of detonation. The service life of a spark plug can vary greatly with operating conditions, engine models, ignition systems and spark plug types. This means adherence to scheduled servicing intervals is essential for optimum performance. It is important all spark plug failures are reported using the defect reporting system so trend monitoring can be effective.

Find out more about spark plug issues in the airworthiness bulletin.

Drone roadmap is coming

CASA is developing a remotely piloted aircraft systems regulatory roadmap to give the drone industry more certainty about the safety regulation of the sector into the future. The roadmap will seek to address airspace integration and unmanned traffic management, certification and airworthiness standards, detect and avoid technology, communication protocols and low cost automatic dependant surveillance-broadcast technology, autonomous systems, registration and e-identification, training and competency, geo-fencing and safety management systems and human factors. In a speech last month CASA's branch manager Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, Luke Gumley, said the drone sector is changing at a revolutionary pace. Luke told the Australian Association for Unmanned Systems conference the roadmap will provide a level of certainty about where CASA is moving with policy and legislation. "The roadmap might not have all the definitive answers as the technology is evolving, however it will provide sufficient information where it is known, to provide certainty to you. I can tell you that in my conversations with the Director, he has made it clear that CASA will be a fast-follower of international developments so that CASA and Australia does not lag other countries."

Read the remotely piloted aircraft in Australian skies speech.

Drone licensing in the spotlight

There's now essential viewing for everyone thinking about entering the professional drone industry. CASA has released a video explaining the benefits of being a licensed drone operator. Experienced drone operators set out the reasons for needing a remote pilot licence, which range from ensuring safe operations to having the financial protection of insurance. The video also explains the steps to obtaining a remote pilot licence and the training offered by approved courses. Ross Anderson of Aviassist says a licence is needed if you want to operate properly in the commercial drone industry. Ross says: "If you want to go out and do the big jobs, if you want to operate in all areas, then getting licensed is mandatory in our opinion". Kelly Monahan of Overall Photography says: "If you're using (a drone) for a job, the people who are going to hire you are going to look for qualifications". The video explains that training covers a wide range of subjects including safe drone flying, the use of aviation radio, weather forecasts, aerodynamics and how to read aviation charts.

Watch the drone licensing video now.

Update on fire extinguishers

Updated information has been released by CASA on the installation of hand held fire extinguishers in aircraft. An airworthiness bulletin looks at a range of issues, including Halon-replacement fire extinguishers. The International Civil Aviation Organization has urged a faster rate of implementing Halon alternatives in fire extinguishers located in engines and auxiliary power units, lavatories and handheld installations. By 2019, new production aircraft will have Halon-replacement handheld fire extinguishers. CASA has implemented this requirement through the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Regardless of whether the regulations require a fire extinguisher or not, CASA recommends at least one extinguisher be fitted to an aircraft and it should be located so it is accessible to a pilot. There are issues to consider in relation to different types of extinguishers being used in aircraft, such as the effects on people when used in closed compartments, corrosion and clean up. When replacing an extinguisher with one using a different extinguishing agent there should be a review of the structural installation. Halocarbon fire extinguishers are heavier than Halon extinguishers.

Read the fire extinguisher airworthiness bulletin.

Bathurst, Dubbo airspace reviews

Reviews of the airspace at Bathurst and Dubbo aerodromes have found there are no risks that require changes to existing airspace arrangements. The Bathurst review identified an opportunity to improve safety through CASA-initiated education and training programs focussed on local procedures, as well as the establishment of a local airspace user forum to raise issues and identify risks. Feedback from airspace users identified some concerns about glider operations, including communication problems between gliders and other aircraft. Recent collaboration between airspace users has identified the benefit of publishing local procedures in a NOTAM for the duration of each gliding camp and the possible benefits of publishing the procedures in ERSA. Feedback from airspace users around Dubbo indicated an improvement in airmanship and frequency management would enhance situational awareness and safety in the region for all airspace users. CASA will continue to provide education and safety information seminars at Dubbo to improve awareness about operations in the vicinity of a non-controlled aerodrome and to enhance awareness of issues related to the close proximity of the Narromine aerodrome. There was insufficient support for the establishment of a broadcast area using a dedicated frequency to cover Dubbo and Narromine.

Read the Bathurst and Dubbo airspace reviews.

In brief

  • A new cabin safety bulletin has been issued covering the seating of disabled passengers.  The bulletin looks at check-in, boarding, safety briefings, emergency rows and seat allocation.
  • A technical working group set up by the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel to CASA held a three-day workshop in April 2018 to provide technical expertise and industry sector insight to the review of Part 66 (aircraft engineer licences and ratings). The working group examined 40 issues identified through an earlier public consultation and developed possible solutions. A report will now go to the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel for consideration.
  • CASA received 27 responses to the Fatigue review final report: implementation considerations consultation. Responses are now being analysed and considered. Feedback will be provided to a technical working group for consideration prior to CASA releasing a detailed response, including an implementation timetable. CASA is extending fatigue exemptions and legislative instruments to enable time for the recommendations to be considered.
  • Mark Rindfleish – who has held senior safety and advisory positions in several major Australian airlines – has been appointed to the CASA Board for a three-year term. Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack announced the appointment. "In addition to possessing a wealth of aviation safety expertise, as a former head of flying operations and chief pilot with Jetstar Airways and Singapore Airlines captain, Mr Rindfleish also brings extensive aviation operational experience to the Board," Mr McCormack said.
  • A proposed legislative instrument covering Required Communication Performance and Required Surveillance Performance(RCP 240 and RSP 180) Capability Declarations is open for comment until 2 May 2018. This instrument would enable aircraft registered in Australia or operated by an Australian operator to declare RCP and RSP capabilities as required in any airspace.

Safety seminars for pilots

The popular lessons for life safety seminars for pilots continue in May 2018. There are seminars being held at:

  • Dubbo
  • Townsville
  • Bathurst
  • Charters Towers
  • Inverell
  • Launceston
  • Armidale
  • Ballina*
  • Burnie
  • Merimbula
  • Derby
  • Broome
  • Alice Springs
  • Yulara
  • Esperance
  • Tooradin
  • Deniliquin

The seminars will explore three major themes: flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents will be used to take pilots through many of the safety-related decisions faced at three crucial phases of flight - before departing, in-flight, and at the crucial arrival and landing phase. CASA's safety advisers ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons. In Ballina a special seminar is being held on radio procedures in the area. Jetstar will talk about their local operational procedures.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar now.

Seminar for engineers

Engineering seminars are being held in May 2018 at Alice Springs and Broome. These seminars will look at a range of topics including airworthiness issues, specialist maintenance certification, regulations and Part 66 licenses. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions.

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.

IALPG Drone Seminar

The AMAS Inc was recently  invited to a drone privacy seminar. Some of the content that was presented at the IALPG Seminar can be found here:

CASA Briefing Newsletter - March 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


Date of Publication: 
28 March 2018

The CASA Briefing, your monthly CASA update

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

CASA has been busy ringing in the changes over the last month in key areas. The most significant initiative has been the release for comment of first part of the so-called ‘six pack’ of interlinked new flight operations regulations. Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations covers the general operating and flight rules and forms the foundation of all aviation operations. The vast majority of the proposed regulations in Part 91 make no change to current requirements as the rules have simply been moved into one package from the Civil Aviation Regulations, Civil Aviation Orders, supporting instruments and exemptions. We have consolidated more than 100 current documents into just two - the new Part 91 and its manual of standards. A range of improvements have also been made to nine areas in the new rules. These are aimed at making compliance easier, providing greater operational flexibility, reducing red tape and paperwork and improving safety.

I appreciate the Part 91 package is lengthy and by necessity written in legal language. To help everyone understand and follow the requirements of Part 91 I am pleased to announce CASA will produce a one-stop guidance document. This Part 91 guidance document will be a pilot’s guide to all the regulations, including the manual of standards requirements, written in the familiar style of the current and popular visual flight rules guide. The guidance document will be made available later this year to give everyone a chance to be familiar with it prior to Part 91 being implemented. I intend the guidance document to be the central reference document used by pilots for the operational rules, as well as a handy guide for CASA examinations. I am keen to provide pilots this practical and user friendly document so that there is less need to reference the actual regulations. This will assist everyone to have a better understanding of the rules and will therefore improve compliance. Naturally, we will continue to look for opportunities to make the regulations and the manual of standards simpler before the rules are finalised.

Please take the opportunity to have your say on Part 91 by going to CASA’s easy-to-use consultation hub. The consultation hub allows you to focus on one or more of the nine areas within Part 91 that introduce changes to requirements or to make general comments about the changes. This means there is no need to read through the whole of Part 91 to have your say on specific issues relevant to your operations. Part 91 consultation is open now.

Two important reforms of the aviation medical system are now in place and work continues to bring in the new basic class two medical by the middle of 2018. The latest medical changes mean designated aviation medical examiners (DAMEs) can issue class 2 medicals on the spot without reference to CASA, unless the DAME elects to refer the application to CASA. Information and training materials have been sent to DAMEs to equip them to take advantage of the new arrangements. These changes, which will come into effect on 4 April 2018, will mean quicker and easier medicals for hundreds of people each month.

We have also released for comment the review of new fatigue rules. This independent review has supported the need for modernised fatigue requirements and made a range of recommendations for improving the rules. Final decisions on the makeup of the new rules will be made after comments on the review have been carefully considered.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Fatigue review recommendations

The independent review of the new fatigue rules found there was a “significant risk exposure that needs to be properly managed”. The review made 24 recommendations aimed at improving the new fatigue rules, the implementation of changes and guidance and information about the rules. Recommendations include more closely aligning flight and duty period limits with international averages, creating two tiers of fatigue risk management system requirements, providing additional flexibility for operators using the prescriptive limits and removing or revising the requirements for aerial application operations. The review recommends a freeze of the transition dates for the implementation of the new fatigue rules and the adoption of a staggered approach to implementation and transition.

The chairman of CASA's Board, Jeff Boyd, has welcomed the fatigue review report. Mr Boyd said: “The review team has confirmed the need to change from the old Civil Aviation Order 48 fatigue rules and standard industry exemptions and CASA’s Board supports this view. The report provides a method to find an appropriate balance between fatigue risk and operational impact and the board is seeking input from industry on potential implementation issues prior to finalising changes to the rules.” CASA is seeking feedback on priorities for actions resulting from the review as well as implementation issues. Feedback should be lodged before 17 April 2018, using CASA’s consultation hub.

Read the fatigue review and have your say now.

Check for seat belt defects

Cabin crew have been reminded of the importance of checking seat belts and crew harnesses for defects. Checking seatbelts and harnesses should not be limited to a maintenance cycle. In a new cabin safety bulletin CASA recommends seat belts be checked on an ongoing basis by the operating crew. Any problems should then be captured in the air operator's defect reporting system. For example, some operators have a cabin condition log where the cabin crew of an aircraft will record deficiencies and this information is then transferred into the aircraft maintenance log. Crew should be reporting any fraying, holes, twisting, or adjustment problems that stop seat belts being used normally. CASA has become aware of seat belt defects on operating aircraft through surveillance activities and reports from the travelling public. The cabin safety bulletin features pictures taken by CASA inspectors of damage to a passenger seatbelt and a crew harness. Neither of the faults had been reported.

Read the seat belt and harness cabin safety bulletin.

R22 fuel tank warning – retrofit now

A strong recommendation has been issued to owners and operators of Robinson R22 helicopters to take action as soon as possible to replace aluminium fuel tanks. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA says retrofitting R22 aircraft with bladder fuel tanks decreases the likelihood of a post-crash fire. The Robinson Helicopter Company has published a revised service bulletin about fuel tank modifications. This revised service bulletin gives a compliance time as soon as practical, but no later than next 2200-hour overhaul, 12 year inspection, or 15 January 2020. The modification needs to be made at whichever milestone occurs first. The service bulletin also provides information on a discount kit and a rebate available for each field installation. CASA’s airworthiness bulletin includes a timely reminder to operators and maintainers of aircraft of the responsibility to follow their approved system of maintenance or the manufacturer’s maintenance program. In this case it means ensuring compliance to all Robinson Helicopter Company service bulletins. There have been multiple crashes of Robinson R22 helicopters with post-impact fires in Australia. One crash involved a survivable training flight where the occupants were able to leave the helicopter before the ruptured fuel tanks ignited.

Read the R22 fuel tank airworthiness bulletin.

Helicopter corrosion warning

A recent helicopter defect report has triggered a warning about the risks of corrosion in salty environments. Corrosion was found on Sikorsky S92 flap stop bracket pins. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA says operators of offshore helicopters need to have in place a rigorous corrosion control program. Before an aircraft is used in offshore operations it should be inspected to establish a base-line of corrosion damage. All major corrosion damage should be reported directly back to the original equipment manufacturer to provide input into the worldwide aging fleet data and to allow corrosion programs to be updated. CASA says aircraft operators should consider mapping individual aircraft corrosion to allow ongoing analysis, as well as collecting corrosion data across all models of aircraft to identify known corrosion spots and to assist future maintenance planning. Internal inspections and corrosion preventive compound application plans can be developed based on mission requirements, operating environments and experience.

Read the helicopter corrosion airworthiness bulletin.

Drone penalties issued

The importance of understanding and always following the drone safety regulations has been highlighted by the latest regulatory infringement notices issued by CASA. Both commercial and recreational drone flyers have been issued penalties for breaching the remotely piloted aircraft safety regulations. A person who conducted commercial drone operations - aerial photography – in the Brisbane central business district was issued with fines for a commercial operation without the required approval ($900) and flying over a populous area ($900). Another commercial drone operator in regional Australia was issued with two fines for demonstration flights at an agriculture show – one for operations over a populous area ($1050) and the other for flying within 30 metres of people not associated with the operation ($210). A commercial drone operator in a major regional centre undertaking aerial photography was issued with two fines relating to commercial operations without a required approval ($1050) and flying over a populous area ($1050). A recreational drone flyer at a store opening in Melbourne was fined ($1050) for operating within 30 metres of people not associated with the operation.

Check the drone safety regulations.

In brief

  • Comment is being called for on a proposal to improve the Part 61 flight instructor rating. The proposed improvements to the requirements would better support flight training operators and trainers to develop and deliver their flight instructor training courses. Changes would also amend the privileges and limitations of certain training endorsements and enhance guidance material. Comment now, with consultation closing on 22 April 2018.
  • Recommendations have been made to operators and maintainers of Cessna 441 aircraft about fatigue cracking of main landing gear trunnions. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA strongly recommends ensuring main landing gear trunnions are cleaned and carefully inspected per the applicable supplemental inspection document. If cracks are present affected trunnions should be replaced as a fracture failure during landing may cause significant damage to the aircraft. The recommendations follow several landing gear failures.
  • Advice has been released to aircraft maintainers on the use of approved model list – supplemental type certificates. These are an approval method that allows a set of compliance data – such as type design data - to be designated as ‘baseline data’ that can be applicable to various aircraft models. It is intended for installations that are identical or similar that share baseline data between models. The advice covers Federal Aviation Administration field approvals, when additional approved data is required and provides guidance on power and wiring.
  • Comment is being sought before 26 April 2018 on a proposed airworthiness directive about wing strut and wing strut fittings on GippsAero GA8 series aeroplanes. The proposed directive would require a general visual inspection of the wing strut and strut fittings for evidence of cracks, corrosion and damage in accordance with the requirements of GippsAero Service Bulletin SB-GA8-2017-174 Issue 1. Affected parts would need to be replaced.
  • Airspace restrictions are about to come into effect for the Commonwealth Games being held in Queensland. From 2 – 18 April 2018 all aircraft and airspace users planning to fly within 90 nautical miles of the Gold Coast airport must comply with the regulations and the procedures detailed in an Aeronautical Information Service Supplement and relevant NOTAMs. An aircraft that does not comply with the air defence identification zone requirements may be subject to intercept by military aircraft and the crew subject to criminal prosecution.
  • Drones are subject to restrictions during the Commonwealth Games at all venues. These restrictions apply from 25 March to 18 April 2018. No sport or recreational drones will be given permission to operate within any of the areas around Games venues. Commercial drone operations will only be allowed if prior approval has been given and no approvals will be given for areas where there will be low level helicopter operations. There will be an increased police presence at all venues to monitor compliance with the restrictions and penalties can be issued.

Safety seminars for pilots

The popular lessons for life safety seminars for pilots continue in April 2018. There are seminars being held at:

  • Kununurra
  • Mackay
  • Airlie Beach
  • Geraldton
  • Mudgee
  • Jandakot
  • Colac

The seminars will explore three major themes: flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents will be used to take pilots through many of the safety-related decisions faced at three crucial phases of flight - before departing, in-flight, and at the crucial arrival and landing phase. CASA's safety advisers ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar now.

Seminar for engineers

An engineering seminar is being held in April at Kununurra. This seminar will look at a range of topics including airworthiness issues, specialist maintenance certification, regulations and Part 66 licenses. It is aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminar is a great professional development opportunity and allows people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions.

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.

 


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RCM News magazine is now availbale as a print friendly PDF version of our print magazine. It's FREE. First published in 1991 the March edition features Bill Hamilton's clever electric conversion Fibre Classics P-51 swings a scale four bladed prop with ease. Flight performance is great. Dave Nichols build the Goldberg Tiger 2 kit. John Armarego's nostaglic build of the fibreglass and foam Sukhoi SU 26. Futaba's new 12J radio system and much more. Print lovers can order their individual subsctiption copy  to be posted to the door. The print edition goes to press Monday moring. Must be ordered on our website before Monday 9.00 AM
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Manilla Slope Fest 2018

A message from the AMAS Inc  acting president, Mr Phillip Poole:

Written permission has been secured, for AMAS Inc members to operate model aircraft, from Mr Godfrey Wenness, owner of the property "The Mountain", 1106 Wimbourne Road, Manilla NSW 2346. It is with that permission that I invite the AMAS Inc membership to the Manilla Slope Fest 2018. The slope fest will be run from the 7th to the 16th September 2018 at the above noted property. Information regarding the property can be found here:

Further information regarding the event can be obtained via Phillip Poole using the following email address:

Notice of General Meeting 2-18



As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom Video Conference.

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 31st March, 2018

at Brigalow Street, Toowoomba Qld. 4530.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th March, 2018.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on/by the 9th March 2018 for initial consideration .

Please be advised that no Notice of Motion or Agenda items were received.

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 15th  March.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 15th March to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS Inc by noon 29th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary, on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

0417879416

CASA Briefing Newsletter - February 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Date of Publication: 
28 February 2018

The CASA Briefing, your monthly CASA update

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

I am pleased to advise significant progress is being made in implementing the key reforms to the aviation medical system we announced late in 2017. From 1 March 2018 a Class 2 medical certificate will be an option for pilots operating non-passenger carrying commercial flights in aircraft with a maximum take-off weight of less than 8618 kilograms. This includes pilots operating in aerial application, flight examiners and flight instructors. Currently these pilots must have a Class 1 medical for these operations. The change opens up the potential pool of pilots for these operations, giving more experienced pilots who no longer hold a Class 1 medical the opportunity to continue to contribute to non-passenger carrying commercial aviation. A particular benefit will be allowing experienced air transport pilots to offer their services and skills to flying training – a change with the potential to benefit current and future pilots.

Another of the announced reforms to aviation medicine is on track to be implemented by late March 2018. This change will allow all designated aviation medical examiners (DAMEs) to issue Class 2 medicals on the spot without reference to CASA, unless the DAME elects to refer the application to CASA. Allowing DAMEs to directly issue Class 2 medicals should simplify and speed up the medical process for hundreds of applicants each month. I can also advise the new Basic Class 2 medical certificate – based on the Austroads commercial vehicle driver standards – is on track to be introduced in the middle of 2018.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Progress on new flight rules

The first consultation with the aviation community on the proposed new general operating and flight rules—Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations - has commenced. An industry technical working group recently undertook evaluation of the draft regulation and the associated manual of standards. The working group was the first to meet since the establishment of the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel – the new group of aviation community representatives that advises CASA on current issues. The working group found the draft regulations and standards broadly achieved the intended policy, although some issues need to be addressed. Where possible the suggested changes will be made, or issues will be highlighted for additional feedback during further consultation. CASA staff supporting the Part 91 working group were impressed by the dedication of the participants and thanked members for their time and valuable feedback. Part 91 is a key element of a suite of regulations covering flight operations, which also includes Parts 119, 121, 133, 135 and 138.

Find out more about Part 91.

New SMS alerts for medicals

A new SMS notification system to assist people who have applied for an aviation medical certificate is now available. Medical applicants can opt to receive SMS notifications from CASA’s medical records system when they lodge their application. An automatic SMS will be sent to their mobile phone number on three occasions: 60 days before a medical certificate is due to expire, once a designated aviation medical examiner has uploaded a medical application to CASA and when a medical certificate has been issued by CASA. The new system will also send manual SMS messages notifying applicants of any correspondence that has been sent by email - such as requests for further information, prompts to supply missing information and reminders to provide previously requested reports.

Find out more about the medical records system.

Codeine now only by prescription

If you’re a pilot, engineer, air traffic controller or anyone else working in a safety sensitive aviation position you need to be aware of the changes to codeine scheduling introduced on 1 February 2018. Medicines containing codeine are now only available with a prescription from your doctor. If your doctor prescribes medicine containing codeine you must notify the organisation you’re working for so appropriate work safety measures can be put in place. CASA already routinely screens for codeine and opiates as part of the alcohol and drug testing program. This is done because codeine can impair performance, making it unsuitable for use in a safety sensitive environment. If you already own medicines containing codeine that you purchased over the counter before 1 February 2018, and you are working in a safety sensitive aviation position, you should not use these medications without a doctor’s report and you must notify your aviation organisation.

More information about the codeine changes can be found at the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s Codeine information hub.

Commonwealth Games airspace restrictions

Airspace restrictions will be in place during the upcoming Commonwealth Games being held on the Gold Coast. From 2 – 18 April 2018 all aircraft and airspace users planning to fly within 90 nautical miles of the Gold Coast airport must comply with the regulations and the procedures detailed in an Aeronautical Information Service Supplement and relevant NOTAMs. Temporary restricted areas and air defence identification zones will be created. Any aircraft unable to comply with the requirements will not be allowed to operate within the temporary restricted areas. Any aircraft that does not comply with the air defence identification zone requirements may be subject to intercept by military aircraft and the crew subject to criminal prosecution. There will be increased Australian Defence Force and Queensland Police Airwing activity in the region. Aircraft transiting the Gold Coast area during the Games should plan to avoid the area from Broadbeach, Porpoise Point Southport, Nerang, Mudgeeraba to Robina due to increased traffic.

The operation of drones is also restricted during the Commonwealth Games, from 25 March to 18 April 2018. An Aeronautical Information Circular sets out temporary restricted areas for drones at the main stadium and all other venues, including those outside the Gold Coast at locations such as Cairns and Townsville. No sport or recreational drones will be given permission to operate within any of the areas around Games venues. Sport and recreational drone flyers must not bring drones to any Games venue. Commercial drone operations will only be allowed if prior approval has been given and no approvals will be given for areas where there will be low level helicopter operations. There will be an increased police presence at all venues to monitor compliance with the restrictions and penalties can be issued.

Find out more about Commonwealth Games airspace.

Get details on drone restrictions.

Keep safe from wasps

A timely reminder has been issued about the risks mud dauber wasps can pose to aircraft. Mud dauber wasps are common across Australia, are up to three centimetres in length and are either completely black or metallic blue, with some species having yellow or greenish markings on the body. Mud dauber wasps will build a nest in any available cavity, including those in aircraft. A defect report investigation found a number of wasp nests inside the wing of a Cessna 182. There was also one large wasp nest entirely suspended on the flight control cables in the rear fuselage. A wasp nest can completely block pitot tubes, fuel tank vents and drains. Wasp nest and insect blockages in pitot tubes are not limited to small aircraft. Each year, CASA receives approximately five defect reports affecting various systems and types of aircraft. Overseas reports detail fatal accidents which have been attributed to wasp nests blocking the pitot tube, resulting in a loss of airspeed indication. In 2013 an Airbus A330 suffered a rejected take-off in Brisbane due to an airspeed indication failure which was only detected during the take-off roll. During the subsequent inspection it was found that the Captain’s pitot probe was almost totally obstructed by an insect nest, consistent with mud-dauber wasp nest residue. Nests can be built in very short periods of time, which means protective covers should be used even during short turn-around times. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA makes a number of recommendations to protect against wasp infestation.

Get all the details about wasp infestation.

Cabin safety focus – turbulence and devices

Two new cabin safety bulletins have been issued – covering portable electronic devices and turbulence and seat belts. Cabin safety bulletins provide guidance to air operators and cabin crew on important safety issues. The importance of seat belts and harnesses is highlighted by the 386 reports of weather-related incidents in 2016. Approximately 86 per cent of all reported weather-related incidents involved windshear or turbulence. Errors that lead to injuries include cabin crew members not being secure during turbulence, cabin crew members standing during critical phases of flight, leaving service equipment unrestrained and handling hot liquids during turbulence. The bulletin also covers passenger seat belts, cabin crew standard operating procedures, training and monitoring and improvement. The bulletin covering portable electronic devices provides guidance on the exemption that permits expanded use of devices. Surveillance and information obtained by CASA has indicated air operators may need to conduct a review to ensure they are meeting the requirements of the exemption relating to the stowage of loose articles. There are a number of steps that must be taken to meet the exemption conditions, including a risk assessment, crew training and passenger information.

Read the turbulence and electronic devices bulletins.

Horn Island airspace review

A review of airspace around Horn Island in the Torres Strait has made six recommendations. The review, by CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation, found the airspace architecture is fit for purpose. However, local area charting needs to be introduced for the Torres Strait area to assist pilots operating into and out of Horn Island. Stakeholder feedback focussed on charting issues and the need for additional infrastructure at Horn Island aerodrome, such as a new taxiway. Airspace users also identified the need for targeted education about the airspace and local procedures for the region. Recommendations include the need for Airservices Australia to publish by 8 November 2018 a visual navigation chart that provides a clear indication of the visual reference points used by visual flight rules aircraft. Airservices is also to include Coconut Island on the Enroute chart low 6 as soon as possible. The Horn Island airport operator should conduct a bi-annual airspace users forum with locally based airspace users and regular transient operators to discuss operating issues or risks associated with flying activity in the region. The Torres Shire Council should consider the safety, efficiency and capacity benefit of a taxiway parallel to runway 08/26.

Read the Horn Island airspace report.

Seminars for pilots

The popular lessons for life safety seminars for pilots continue in March 2018. There are seminars being held at:

  • Swan Hill
  • Schofield
  • Maitland
  • Point Cook
  • Cooma
  • Jacobs Well*
  • Gympie
  • Kyneton
  • Innisfail
  • Bundaberg
  • Maryborough
  • Mareeba
  • Jabiru

The seminars will explore three major themes: flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents will be used to take pilots through many of the safety-related decisions faced at three crucial phases of flight - before departing, in-flight, and at the crucial arrival and landing phase. Updates will be delivered on key safety messages and issues from Airservices Australia, the Bureau of Meteorology and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. CASA's safety advisers ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons. Seminars marked by an asterisk include a briefing by Airservices Australia on the airspace and procedure changes around the Gold Coast during the upcoming Commonwealth Games.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.

In brief

  • Remember the 2017 Flight Safety Australia Collectors' Edition is now available. This print magazine is a bumper collection of more than 50 articles that were published online during 2017. It includes features, contributor and general articles, aviation medicine and maintenance articles, and a close-call section written by pilots who share their experiences in the name of safety. Order a copy of the magazine now.
  • Feedback has strongly supported proposed changes to helicopter licensing requirements in relation to the 105 hour training option for the commercial helicopter pilot licence. Consultation on the proposal attracted 63 submissions. CASA will now make changes to the licensing regulations, with an amendment required to Part 61 of Civil Aviation Safety Regulations before 31 August 2018. Legislative instruments could be made to give effect to the proposals. Read the responses and next steps.
  • The 30 April 2018 deadline for air operators and Part 141 certificate holders to submit draft operations manual changes or apply for a fatigue risk management system in preparation for transition to new fatigue rules has been removed. A new transition deadline will be announced soon. The decision to remove the deadline was foreshadowed in December 2017 due to the ongoing independent review of fatigue rules. Both CASA and the aviation community will require more time to respond to the final review findings, which are scheduled to be delivered to CASA in March 2018.
  • Radio communication requirements for gliding operations in Class E airspace will be updated in the 1 March 2018 Aeronautical Information Package. Unless otherwise authorised, glider pilots in Class E airspace must maintain a listening watch on the appropriate air traffic control frequency. The Gliding Federation of Australia and CASA have worked together to better define the circumstances under which glider pilots can operate off-frequency in Class E. When flying in groups glider pilots can nominate one aircraft to monitor air traffic control and pass on traffic information to other gliders using a discrete glider frequency. Special arrangements can also be made for gliding competitions or events, with authorisation to be provided through a NOTAM issued by Airservices Australia. These practices are commonly used by glider pilots flying in Class E airspace already and the updated advice formalises the procedures.

Notice of General Meeting 1-18


As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom Video Conference.

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 31st March, 2018

at Brigalow Street, Toowoomba Qld. 4530.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th March, 2018.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on/by the 9th March 2018 for initial consideration .

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 15th  March.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 15th March to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS Inc by noon 29th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary, on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

0417879416

CASA Briefing Newsletter - January 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

CASA has started the New year with a few organisational changes designed to put a clearer focus on our priorities and make sure we use our human and other resources in the most effective and efficient ways. This is not a massive change from the structure we have been working under for some time, more like adjustments and improvements. I believe these alterations will bring tangible benefits for the aviation community.

One important change is the creation of a new branch covering general, recreational and sport aviation. This will ensure a stronger focus on the general aviation sector within CASA, a move I know will be welcomed by many. I believe that a vibrant general aviation sector is important for the health of the aviation community as a whole. While CASA's influence on the strength and performance of the general aviation sector is limited, we can play a role by ensuring regulatory requirements are reasonable and fit for purpose. We must also ensure we minimise regulatory red tape and make the processes for gaining authorisations and approvals as smooth as possible. The General, Recreational and Sport Aviation branch will be the key contact point between general aviation and CASA. Responsibilities of the branch will include entry control, surveillance, regulatory services and oversight of the new Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Part 149 will cover approved self-administering sport and recreational aviation organisations and is close to being made.

In another key change, CASA's Aviation Group now has two divisions – the National Operations and Standards division, and the Regulatory Services and Surveillance division. The position of executive manager Regulatory Services and Surveillance division has been filled by new recruit Peter White. Peter's background includes transport security and regulatory reform and he is also a recreational pilot. Recruitment for executive manager of National Operations and Standards is well advanced. CASA's other divisions are Stakeholder Engagement, Corporate Services and Legal and Regulatory Affairs. A number of changes have been made to these divisions to better use our existing resources. If you would like to look at our new structure in more detail please go to our organisational chart.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Your feedback needed on maintenance review

A comprehensive review of a key package of maintenance regulations is underway. The aviation community is being asked to provide feedback on Part 145 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 and associated legislation. Part 145 covers organisations that provide maintenance services for regular public transport aircraft and aeronautical products. It was introduced in 2011. CASA believes some elements of the regulations can be simplified and some requirements made less restrictive. The aim is to make improvements while maintaining compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization standards and achieving harmonisation with other jurisdictions such as the European Aviation Safety Agency. A number of areas within the Part 145 regulations and associated manual of standards have already been identified as needing to be addressed as a priority. These include specialist maintenance, regulatory complexity and international harmonisation. CASA will use feedback to the Part 145 review to develop interim measures to provide temporary relief from identified issues - such as specialist maintenance complexities - until longer term changes can be implemented. Overall, the review seeks to ensure the Part 145 package effectively addresses relevant safety risks, as well as identifying and addressing any errors, omissions, gaps, unintended consequences or implementation issues.

Have your say on the Part 145 review before 16 February 2018.

All you need to know about airspace management

There's a lot to know about the evolving area of communications, navigation, surveillance and air traffic management. The good news is CASA has produced a comprehensive package of resources to take pilots through all the key elements of the satellite-based technology being used for the management of Australian airspace. The new CNS/ATM kit covers communication, global navigation satellite systems, surveillance, automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast system, aircraft equipment, performance-based navigation, flight planning and associated human factors issues. It is made up of a resource guide, workbook and DVD. The videos on the DVD step through a range of issues including how satellite navigation works, automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast, the global navigation satellite system and human factors. The workbook contains questions and activities to test knowledge gained from using the CNS/ATM kit. It can assist when preparing for the instrument flight rating exam and other qualifications.

Order a copy of the CNS/ATM kit now. Or use the kit online.

Sponsorships on offer now

CASA is offering sponsorships to organisations actively promoting aviation safety. Applications can be made for the latest round of sponsorship support until 2 March 2018. The sponsorship program targets community and not-for-profit organisations. CASA sponsors activities such as conferences, workshops and seminars, safety forums, educational programs, publications and recreational or industry events. Most sponsorship is delivered by financial support and is typically less than $5000. In the latest sponsorship round CASA is looking for applications that support current safety promotion priorities and activities. These include safety management systems, new aviation rules, drone safety awareness, targeted helicopter safety information, airport safety, sport aviation safety and ageing aircraft safety issues. Sponsorship applications must be made using the form available on the CASA web site.

Find out more about CASA sponsorships and make an application.

Survey will test CASA's performance

CASA is about to conduct the second of its regular surveys to find out how the aviation community rates its performance. It has been more than two years since the first survey of CASA's relationships and interactions with the aviation community and it is now time to check how CASA is tracking against the benchmark data obtained in late 2015. A professional market research organisation will conduct the survey from a sample of people and organisations representing all sectors of the aviation community. People in aviation may receive a letter or email in late February 2018 from a market research organisation asking if they can participate in the survey. CASA encourages everyone who is approached to give a little of their time to share their honest feedback. Hearing directly from the aviation community allows CASA to gain a frank view of what it is doing well and what is working, as well as importantly where improvements need to made.

Find out more about the CASA performance survey.

Aerodrome information needs checking

Airservices Australia is asking the aviation community to assist in verifying the accuracy of information held about a number of aerodromes, aeroplane landing areas and helicopter landing sites. Owners and operators of these locations are being asked to fill in a form confirming important information such as contact details, aerodrome reference point and the number of movements. Much of the information held on aerodromes not in the Enroute Supplement Australia FAC can be decades old, with varying degrees of accuracy and completeness. CASA's regulations require processes to be in place to manage the integrity of aeronautical information and this is now needed for aerodromes not in the Enroute Supplement Australia FAC and for aeroplane landing areas and helicopter landing sites. The information held about these locations in the aeronautical information package is important for a range of reasons, particularly now that it used in CASA's 'Can I Fly There?' drone app. Drone operators use the app to identify areas where aircraft are flying at low altitudes to avoid the risk of collisions. Pilots who use aerodromes or aircraft landing areas on the list are asked to bring the aerodrome data validation process to the attention of owners and operators of the locations.

Full details of the aerodrome validation.

More time for fatigue changes

Air operators and flying training organisations have more time to transition to the new fatigue risk management rules. CASA had set a deadline of 30 April 2018 for organisations to either submit draft changes to operations manuals to comply with the new requirements or to apply for a fatigue risk management system. The decision to remove the existing 30 April 2018 deadline was based on the preliminary report of an independent review of the new fatigue rules. Dédale Asia Pacific, a Melbourne-based human factors and safety consultancy, is leading the review, which is looking at the fatigue rules for air operators and pilots contained in Civil Aviation Order 48.1 Instrument 2013. This review was commissioned following feedback from the aviation community. The review team has found both CASA and the aviation industry will require more time to respond to their final report, which is due in March 2018. A new transition deadline will be announced after CASA fully considers all the recommendations contained in the final report of the independent review team. Operators can still choose to adopt the current fatigue regulations now, including a fatigue risk management system.

Find out more about fatigue management changes.

Comment on ADS-B compatible technology

Time is running down on your chance to have a say on making automatic dependent surveillance - broadcast (ADS-B) technology more accessible for visual flight rules aircraft. CASA has issued a discussion paper seeking comment on options to reduce the cost of ADS-B installation and maintenance, standards suitable for visual flight rules aircraft, developing technical standards and various ADS-B configurations. The discussion paper looks at portable installations, indicative equipment costs, ADS-B IN equipment and ADS-B use by remotely piloted aircraft. All aircraft operating under the instrument flight rules are already required to carry ADS-B transmitting equipment and there is an extensive ADS-B ground receiver network used by air traffic control. Current technical specifications for ADS-B are designed for instrument flight rules operations in controlled airspace and the requirements may preclude ADS-B solutions suitable for use in visual flight rules aircraft. Very few visual flight rules aircraft have been voluntarily fitted with ADS-B OUT technology as the cost of installing the equipment can be prohibitive. CASA hopes that by exploring ADS-B compatible technologies a safe and effective solution may be available at a reduced cost to allow greater voluntary fitting of the equipment.

Have your say on options for ADS-B for visual flight rules aircraft by 23 February 2018

In brief

  • The 2017 Flight Safety Australia Collectors' Edition is now available. This print magazine is a bumper collection of more than 50 articles that were published online during 2017. It includes feature articles, contributor and general articles, aviation medicine and maintenance articles, and a close-call section written by pilots who share their experiences in the name of safety. Order a copy of the magazine now.
  • New guidance information is available on the manufacture of fixed pitch wooden propellers. Covers manufacturing processes, acceptable timbers, moisture content, brittleness and marking.
  • Responses to consultation on the maintenance of limited category aircraft have been published. The submissions and a summary of the responses are available on the CASA consultation hub.
  • Consultation on the discussion paper issued by the Department of Infrastructure on indemnity and insurance arrangements for industry delegates and authorised persons has been extended until 31 January 2018.
  • A new edition of the licensing instrument - prescription of aircraft and ratings (edition 4) - is now available. A guidance only version of the instrument is also available.
  • Dates for the 2018 flight examiner rating course classroom workshops have been released. The workshops will be held from March to November 2018 at CASA regional offices.
  • Ms Jane McAloon has been appointed to the CASA Board. Ms McAloon has extensive Board and governance experience, including working in regulated industries in the public and private sector in transport and infrastructure. Ms Anita Taylor has been re-appointed to the Board. The appointments of Ian Smith and Murray Warfield concluded on 2 December 2017.

Calling all pilots

The popular safety seminars for pilots continue during 2018, with the focus on lessons for life. Seminars are being held at nineteen locations in February 2018:

  • Melbourne
  • Strathalbyn
  • Gatton
  • Mildura
  • Lethbridge
  • Shepparton
  • Southport*
  • Gold Coast*
  • Latrobe Valley
  • Lismore*
  • Adelaide
  • Sale
  • Sunshine Coast*
  • Caboolture*
  • Forbes
  • Temora
  • Redcliffe*
  • Archerfield*
  • Wangaratta

The seminars will explore three major themes: flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents will be used to take pilots through many of the safety-related decisions faced at three crucial phases of flight - before departing, in-flight, and at the crucial arrival and landing phase. An update will be delivered on key safety messages and issues from Airservices Australia, the Bureau of Meteorology and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. CASA's safety advisers ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons. Seminars marked by an asterisk include a briefing by Airservices Australia on the airspace and procedure changes around the Gold Coast during the upcoming Commonwealth Games.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.


Feedback

We want your comments and questions.

Please send feedback to CASA Briefing now.

Social Media

Follow CASA on social media now.

We're on FacebookTwitterLinkedin and YouTube.

Christmas message from the AMAS Inc committee

Christmas can be a magical time for most of us.

It brings back happy memories of family gatherings and charming traditions that have been passed down through the generations. 

Christmas carols, gift exchanges and family feasts are just some of the enduring traditions that make the season one of the world's favourite festive occasions.

Christmas means something different to every person and family. 

Sadly it is is also a time of great loneliness and depression for some.  

Everyone appreciates a simple card or a message. If you are alone, remember the good times, friends and family past. Celebrate them!  

If you know someone who is have difficulty at this time Reach out to them.  Invite them for a meal.  Try to make a difference in their lives.   

Make this Christmas special for someone in need. It will automatically become special for you.  


Many families take a family picture to send with a card, text messages or even emails wishing others a Merry Christmas will make them feel special.

The best gifts in life will never be found under a Christmas tree, those gifts are mates, friends, family, children and the ones you love.

 

On behalf of the committee at AMAS Inc  we wish a merry Christmas, prosperous and safe New Year to all our AMAS aeromodelling community .

Safely celebrate this Christmas with friends, like a child, with toys that fly.   

Enjoy the innocence of Christmas.


Seasons greetings from the AMAS Inc committee.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - December 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

Rather than slowing down in the final month of 2017, CASA has delivered on a number of long standing issues. The announcement of major reforms to the aviation medical system was widely welcomed by the aviation community, including by organisations such as the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association who are not noted for being CASA supporters. I thank the people and organisations who worked with CASA to develop the plans for the reforms and ask for a little patience while we put the changes into place during the coming months. My aim is to have the new basic class two aviation medical available for pilots by the middle of 2018. I have noted that some people would like the reforms to go further and I understand this sentiment. However, I believe the changes we have announced are significant and will offer thousands of general aviation pilots access to a simpler and easier aviation medical. Importantly, this is not the end of aviation medical reform. CASA will be undertaking a holistic review of the aviation medical system and this means we will be striving for further improvements and reforms.

Two other significant developments were the next step in introducing new radio procedures for use in low-level class G airspace and the beginning of consultation on options for low cost ADS-B. Final consultation is being undertaken on using the MULTICOM frequency as the common low-level class G frequency below 5000 feet where there is no other established frequency. CASA has listened to the views of the aviation community on this issue, particularly general aviation. Our earlier discussion paper found 82 per cent of respondents supported the MULTICOM proposal and on the basis of this overwhelming support CASA developed a set of proposals that maintain and enhance safety while offering operational benefits. I am pleased that we have moved to resolve this issue as it had generated considerable debate over a number of years. Low cost ADS-B is another potential win for general aviation and the views and detailed comments of pilots and aircraft maintainers are essential in developing future plans. I look forward to reading responses to the ADS-B discussion paper in the New Year.

The year ahead will be a big year for CASA. As well as the implementation of the aviation medicine and MULTICOM changes, I am committed to finalising the remaining suites of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. This work alone will be a huge task for our organisation. In addition we will be completing the review into the new fatigue regulations, which will allow a final policy position to be reached. I would like to thank everyone in the aviation community who has worked with CASA and contributed to maintaining and improving aviation safety during 2017. Safety belongs to the whole aviation community and CASA will continue its work of supporting, facilitating and educating in the year ahead. Enjoy the holiday break and fly safely.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Have your say on low cost ADS-B

A package of initiatives to cut the costs and red tape of fitting automatic dependant surveillance - broadcast (ADS-B) technology in visual flight rules aircraft has been released for comment. CASA wants to hear the views of the aviation community on the best ways to make ADS-B OUT more easily accessible for visual flight rules operations. A new discussion paper seeks comment on options to reduce the cost of ADS-B installation and maintenance, standards suitable for visual flight rules aircraft, developing technical standards and various ADS-B configurations. It also looks at portable installations, indicative equipment costs, ADS-B IN equipment and ADS-B use by remotely piloted aircraft.

All aircraft operating under the instrument flight rules are already required to carry ADS-B transmitting equipment and there is an extensive ADS-B ground receiver network used by air traffic control. Current technical specifications for ADS-B are designed for instrument flight rules operations in controlled airspace and the requirements may preclude ADS-B solutions suitable for use in visual flight rules aircraft. Very few visual flight rules aircraft have been voluntarily fitted with ADS-B OUT technology as the cost of installing the equipment can be prohibitive. CASA hopes that by exploring ADS-B compatible technologies a safe and effective solution may be available at a reduced cost to allow greater voluntary fitting of the equipment. CASA currently has no intention of requiring ADS-B technology to be fitted to visual flight rules aircraft – ADS-B equipment remains an option.

Have your say on options for ADS-B for visual flight rules aircraft by 23 February 2018.

Comment now on low level frequency proposals

The next step towards the introduction of new procedures for radio use in low level class G airspace has been taken. A notice of proposed rule making has been released for comment on using the MULTICOM frequency of 126.7 MHz as the common low-altitude frequency in class G airspace. It would be used where a discrete frequency such as common traffic advisory frequency or broadcast area does not exist. It is proposed that aircraft operating to both the visual flight rules and instrument flight rules will monitor and broadcast on the MULTICOM frequency below 5000 feet. Instrument flight rules aircraft would still be required to monitor and respond on the overlying area VHF frequency where able. CASA is also proposing to increase the size of common traffic advisory frequency broadcast areas from 10 to 20 nautical miles laterally and up to 5000 feet vertically. This will enhance the safety of instrument flight rules operations, particularly air transport operations. It will ensure all aircraft at a common traffic advisory frequency aerodrome are on the same frequency, including aircraft conducting instrument approaches, which typically commence at around 15 nautical miles. This change will result in all traffic being alerted earlier to incoming instrument flight rules traffic and will avoid instrument flight rules aircraft having to manage multiple frequency changes in a very short period, thus reducing cockpit workload. Using the MULTICOM at low levels was strongly supported in responses to an earlier discussion paper issued by CASA.

Have your say on the low level frequency proposals by 12 January 2018.

Drone registration supported

Strong support for some form of drone registration scheme has been expressed by people responding to a CASA drone discussion paper. Eighty six per cent of the 910 responses supported drone registration, although there was disagreement about how this should be achieved. Registration options include basing schemes on the owner, operator or drone, with weight or the type of operation being a determining factor in whether registration is required. A majority of respondents said small drones should not be required to be registered. The analysis of the discussion paper found broad support for mandatory training and proficiency for drone flyers. Weight was again seen as a determining factor in the need for training and proficiency. There was strong support for free and user friendly education on the safe flying of drones, with e-learning mentioned as valuable. Views on whether mandatory geo-fencing technology should be fitted to all drones were evenly split for and against. Some people believe geo-fencing should be used in areas close to airports while others say the technology is ineffective. In the area of counter drone technology most people were supportive of trained law enforcement personnel having access to the capability. Many people said this technology should not be available to the general public. Overall, people responding to the discussion paper said the current drone rules are appropriate and CASA is doing a good job. CASA is now considering the detailed feedback as part of a review of drone regulation.

Go to the drone discussion paper responses.

Work starts on major reforms to medicals system

Work is now underway to implement a series of major reforms to the aviation medical certificate system. The reforms include creating a new category of private pilot medical certificate, allowing non passenger carrying commercial operations under a full Class 2 medical certificate and extending the delegation of medical decision making to medical professionals. The new medical certificate category to be known as a basic Class 2 will be available to private pilots flying piston engine powered aircraft carrying up to five non fare paying passengers. Operations will be limited to the daytime visual flight rules and will be permitted in all classes of airspace. This basic Class 2 medical certificate will only require an assessment by a doctor using the Austroads commercial vehicle driver standards. General practitioners will be able to carry out assessments. There will be no additional medical review by CASA of the basic class 2. Medical issues covered by the Austroad commercial standard include cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, psychiatric conditions, blackouts substance abuse and vision and hearing disorders. The new basic Class 2 medical will be valid for a maximum of five years up to the age of 40 and a maximum of two years above the age of 40. The current unrestricted Class 2 medical certificate will remain in place for private pilots operating aircraft up to 8618 kilograms with a maximum of nine non fare paying passengers. This unrestricted Class 2 medical will be used under all flight rules and allow for operations in all classes of airspace. Importantly, pilots flying commercial operations with no passengers – such as flying training and aerial agriculture – will now be able to do so on the basis of an unrestricted Class 2 medical certificate. Previously these operations required the pilot to hold a Class 1 medical certificate. The reforms to aviation medical certification will be progressively introduced during 2018.

We’re closed for the holiday period

Time is running out to obtain any regulatory services from CASA before the Christmas-New Year holidays. CASA will be closed from end of business Friday 22 December 2017 until start of business Tuesday 2 January 2018. New applications, variations and renewals should be submitted to CASA well before Friday 22 December 2017, as only urgent matters will receive attention on the day. All normal services will resume on Tuesday 2 January 2018. Over the holiday period there will be some CASA staff available to help with urgent aviation safety matters but please limit enquiries to matters that need immediate attention. For holiday season help call the main CASA telephone number – 131 757 – and follow the prompts. Foreign air operators looking for information over the Christmas-New Year period should go to the international operations section of the CASA web site. Urgent assistance for international operations requests such as non-scheduled medical flights can be obtained by calling +61 7 3144 7400. CASA will also assist with urgent or emergency airspace requests - call +61 2 6217 1177.

Get all the 2017-18 holiday information.

Holiday season cabin safety campaign

A holiday season cabin safety campaign has been launched by CASA using a series of videos targeting poor passenger behaviour. High quality animated videos deliver safety messages on issues such as listening to cabin safety briefings, wearing seat belts, limiting carry-on luggage, losing electronic devices in seats, smoking in toilets, safe carriage of children, following crew instructions and emergency evacuations. The messages are delivered using ‘jelly bean’ characters that show the disastrous consequences of failing to do the right thing on board an aircraft. The campaign will increase public awareness of important cabin safety issues and support airline safety messages. The campaign’s concept has been supported by the Asia Pacific Cabin Safety Working Group. CASA has also recently updated cabin safety web site information and issued new cabin safety bulletins to the aviation industry.

Watch the cabin safety campaign video.

Go to the cabin safety web pages.

Go to the cabin safety bulletin.

In brief

Comment is being sought on a policy paper on indemnity and insurance arrangements for industry delegates and authorised persons. There are four proposals – continuing current arrangements, extending coverage, case-by-case coverage and coverage where commercial insurance is not available. Lodge comments by 22 December.

A new edition of the legislative instrument that sets out the flight review requirements and type ratings for specified aircraft types under Part 61 of Civil Aviation Safety Regulations has been released. It also prescribes the flight training and flight review requirements for the exercise of the privileges of specified class ratings.

Drone discussion paper report now available [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has just released the interim analysis of responses to CASA's Discussion paper.

The analysis can be downloaded from this link here: https://consultation.casa.gov.au/regulatory-program/dp1708os/consultation/published_select_respondent


.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - November 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Date of Publication: 
23 November 2017

The CASA Briefing

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

As we approach the end of 2017 there are three key issues I am pushing towards resolution. These are reforms to the aviation medicine system, radio frequency use at low levels in uncontrolled airspace and drone regulation. While it will not be possible to make regulatory or other changes before the end of this year, I do want everyone in the aviation community to be clear about CASA’s intent on these policies and for action plans to be under development where required. CASA has conducted consultation on all three issues and we have reached, or are developing, policy positions that reflect the legitimate interests of people across the aviation community while ensuring we get appropriate and optimal safety outcomes. As in everything we do CASA is striving to find the right balance between safety, operational flexibility and sensible rule making.

I know there is keen interest in the reform of aviation medicine, with 164 responses submitted to our discussion paper on the topic. After carefully looking at the responses we are close to finalising positions on a range of aviation medical changes, including streamlining the medical process for private pilots. Much of this work is based on the latest assessment of medical risks, along with a goal of removing unnecessary red tape where this is possible without impacting safety outcomes. I believe the aviation community accepts the need for medical standards and assessments in key operational positions, as long as the requirements are proportional to the risks. Of course risks are never static, so we do need to review our requirements when appropriate, which is exactly what we are doing. I expect to announce proposed medical changes before the close of 2017.

A notice of proposed rule making on low level radio frequencies will also be released before the end of 2017. This will set out how we will implement the decision to use the multicom frequency 126.7 below 5000 feet in class G airspace, as well as associated changes. Instrument flight rules traffic will still be required to monitor the relevant area frequency below 5000 feet and CASA will encourage visual flight rules traffic to do the same. In the area of drone regulation we are completing the analysis of the feedback to the recent discussion paper on the future of regulation for this sector. Initial analysis shows a high level of support for both some type of drone registration scheme and a level of mandatory training for people flying drones. With the continuing rapid growth in the drone sector there are clearly important regulatory decisions to be made in 2018.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


New approach to surveillance outcomes

A number of important changes have been made to CASA’s approach to safety surveillance. Surveillance findings are now being presented in a simpler and more easily understood format. The aim is to clearly link surveillance findings to safety outcomes, encouraging a genuinely collaborative approach between CASA and the aviation community to maintaining and improving safety. There are now three levels of surveillance findings – safety alerts, safety findings and safety observations. Safety alerts are issued to identify regulatory deficiencies that require immediate attention by the aviation authorisation holder that has been audited or checked. Safety findings, which were previously known as non-compliance notices or NCNs, identify regulatory issues that require timely attention by the authorisation holder but are not urgent. Safety observations are issued when CASA finds areas where safety performance could potentially be improved. There is no change to findings in relation to aircraft defects, which will continue to be raised as Aircraft Survey Reports – known as ASRs. CASA is also taking a more proactive approach to sharing information as part of surveillance activity. During the exit meeting at the end of surveillance activity CASA will wherever possible advise authorisation holders of any potential findings, including safety alerts, safety findings or safety observations. These findings will be provisional but the early sharing of this information will give authorisation holders the chance to immediately start working to resolve any issues. Surveillance findings will be formally confirmed in writing after full consideration and review. The surveillance changes have been made in response to recommendations made in the Australian Government’s Aviation Safety Regulation Review.

Find out more from the surveillance fact sheet.

Regulatory challenges have been set

CASA is challenging itself to produce aviation safety regulations that are reasonable and relevant. That’s a key message from the chair of CASA’s Board, Jeff Boyd, in the 2016-17 annual report. Mr Boyd says: “CASA’s Board is working closely with the organisation to drive a practical approach to regulation. We have set some ambitious targets for the release of all outstanding regulations and we will meet them by working to a deadline with defined deliverables and being transparent by making the regulation reform timeline public. We have demonstrated also, through the delay in releasing the fatigue management rule set, for example, that we are prepared to stop and review whether our proposed solutions are fit for purpose.” Mr Boyd adds there has been a shift in the way CASA regulates, as well as a commitment to improvement and pragmatism, which has been driven by CASA’s regulatory philosophy. “That said there is little room for complacency: international, technological, economic and industry developments mean that the regulation of aviation safety must continually evolve and adapt. In response, CASA must regularly adjust and review its own activities and operations to ensure that the organisation remains fit for purpose in a rapidly changing environment. And we know we must do things efficiently and effectively, with a view to meeting the expectations of the Government while achieving satisfactory outcomes for the aviation industry.”

Read more about CASA in the 2016-17 annual report.

Keep track of your application

CASA is introducing a new SMS notification system for people who submit remote pilot and flight crew licensing applications. The changes are part of continued efforts to improve the way CASA communicates with the aviation community. The new SMS notification system will let people know when application processing starts and finishes. This means applicants won’t need to keep checking the CASA Self Service online system to see how their application is progressing. Never-the-less, CASA Self Service will still provide the information for anyone who prefers to access it online. There is no need to register to receive the SMS notifications – applicants just need to make sure their contact details, including their mobile phone number, are up to date. Over the coming months the system will be expanded to provide notifications to people applying for aviation medical certificates.

Find out more about the new SMS notification system.

Christmas-New Year closure details

CASA will be taking a break over the Christmas-New Year holiday period. Normal services provided to the aviation community will not be available from close of business Friday 22 December 2017 until start of business Tuesday 2 January 2018. People who anticipate needing CASA services during the holiday period should contact CASA well before the closure. New applications, variations and renewals should be submitted to CASA as soon as possible. In particular please note that only urgent issues can be dealt with on Friday 22 December 2017. All normal services will resume on Tuesday 2 January 2018. Over the holiday period there will be some CASA staff available to help with urgent aviation safety matters but please limit enquiries to matters that need immediate attention. For holiday season help call the main CASA telephone number – 131 757 – and follow the prompts. Foreign air operators looking for information over the Christmas-New Year period should go to the international operations section of the CASA web site. Urgent assistance for international operations requests such as non-scheduled medical flights can be obtained by calling +61 7 3144 7400. CASA will also assist with urgent or emergency airspace requests - call +61 2 6217 1177.

Get all the 2017-18 holiday information.

Aircraft flight manuals explained

A new advisory circular is now available on aircraft flight manuals. The circular sets out the requirements for aircraft flight manuals and lists aircraft not required to have the document. This includes aircraft up to a maximum take-off weight of 2,722 kg manufactured and flown prior to 1 March 1979, historic and ex-military aircraft, amateur-built aircraft and experimental aircraft. Covered in the circular are topics such as the format of aircraft flight manuals, approvals for changes, maintaining the manuals, pilot requirements and carriage of the manuals in aircraft. For some older aircraft, the aircraft flight manual may be referred to as the pilot’s operating handbook, the owner’s handbook or the owner’s manual. The Civil Aviation Regulations require the registered operator of an aircraft to ensure the aircraft flight manual is at all times appropriate for the aircraft, having regard to any modifications or repairs. The regulations also require a pilot in command to comply with the requirements, instructions, procedures or limitations on the operation of an aircraft as set out in an aircraft flight manual. If an aircraft flight manual has been issued for a particular aircraft it must be carried on board at all times unless the aircraft is operated under an air operator’s certificate and an approved operations manual is carried.

Go to the aircraft flight manual advisory circular.

Fines issued for drone breaches

CASA continues to issues penalties for breaches of the remotely piloted aircraft safety regulations. So far in 2017 more than 20 people have been fined for breaking the drone rules. Recently a recreational drone flyer was fined $900 for operating over a Victorian jumps horse race, which was deemed a populous area. A recreational drone flyer was fined $1050 for operating a drone over a state netball carnival in Queensland – again deemed a populous area. In Sydney, a recreational drone flyer who took to the air near the Harbour Bridge and Opera House was fined $540 for operating in the Sydney Harbour restricted airspace. A South Australian recreational drone operator was issued with a $900 penalty for flying beyond visual line of sight. All these fines were avoidable by simply following the safety rules at all times and in the case of the Sydney Harbour flight by using the Can I Fly There? app, which shows restricted airspace and other no-fly zones. CASA has also counselled many drone flyers for operations that potentially breach the remotely piloted aircraft regulations.

Follow the drone safety rules at all times.

Checking battery capacity

Advice on lead acid battery capacity tests is now available. An in-flight battery failure resulting in a loss of electrical power can be catastrophic. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA says a battery capacity test provides an indication of the condition of the battery and provides an initial starting point for the first charge. The capacity of a battery is the ability to deliver current for a minimum amount of time while remaining above a minimum voltage. The battery is considered airworthy if it meets 80 to 85 per cent of its one hour capacity rating. Proper maintenance is essential if batteries are to achieve maximum life and performance. Testing is done by connecting a fully charged battery that has been removed from an aircraft to a capacity tester that incorporates a load resistance, amp meter, volt meter and a timer. Batteries that are found to be airworthy must be recharged before being refitted to an aircraft as charging while in an aircraft is dangerous and prohibited. The airworthiness bulletin provides advice on how often battery capacity tests should be carried out.

Get the full details on battery capacity tests.

In brief

CASA has responded to feedback on new helicopter licensing requirements. Comment is being sought by 3 December 2017 on a proposal to amend Part 61 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations to include a 105 hour training option for the commercial helicopter pilot licence. This reflects the old 105 hour option in the Civil Aviation Regulations.

The list of maintenance training organisations approved to carry out aircraft maintenance training theory and practical training has been updated.

The advisory circular on using a Part 66 licence to provide certification for completion of maintenance has been updated.

Guidance on use of night vision imaging systems during helicopter operations has been updated.

On 9 November 2017 changes to the phraseology for standard instrument departures and arrivals - SIDs and STARs - took effect in Australia.

The manual of standards for Part 90 – additional airworthiness requirements – has changed the requirements for flight crew seating, emergency exits, and carriage of fire extinguishers.

Flight Safety Australia - November-December 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED

Flight Safety Australia November–December 2017 out now

Download the magazine app on your Apple or Android device.

Flight Safety Australia News Site, Download in the App Store, Download from Google Play

Flight Safety Australia asks an awkward question for the lead story of the November–December 2017 edition: can an aircraft be hacked? The answer from aviation experts is a reassuring 'no', but computer security experts are not so sure. In the modern world of cyberwarfare and 'botnet' attacks by internet-connected baby monitors they find it an intriguing question. While robust engineering and network protocols surround aircraft flight controls, other parts of the aviation system are not so well protected.

Keeping your biological software running without glitches is the subject of a straightforward story on sleep hygiene. Sleep is essential for the mental performance required to fly—or maintain—an aircraft safely and restful sleep requires the right 'hygienic' conditions.

There's a handy summary and guide to the features and potential benefits of a satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) for global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). An SBAS increases the reliability and accuracy of GNSS allowing navigation to an order of a few centimetres. This opens the potential for new uses, such as accurate approach guidance.

We take a long, fond backward glance at the Boeing 747, an epoch-making aircraft now going out of service at an accelerating rate. The nearly 50-year career of the original 'jumbo jet' began in the era when the world's airlines had several fatal crashes every month, and will end in an era where there are fewer fatal crashes in a typical year despite passenger numbers growing more than tenfold. The integrity and flying qualities of the 747 must take some credit for this, despite the type being involved in the two most deadly air crashes ever.

Contributor Adrian Park analyses a deadly runway crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-11 at Narita Airport, Japan in 2009. Thomas P. Turner discusses the insidious hazard of partial power loss, and Kreisha Ballantyne laments how some part-time pilots are, in effect, unreachable by safety messages. The issue also revisits the grim topic of wire strike, a subtle and multifaceted hazard that any pilot or aircrew member required to operate at low altitude needs to be intimately aware of. There's also simple, practical information on how to interpret the Telatemp stickers used on Robinson helicopters.

The popular quiz and reader-submitted close calls round out a packed edition.
And remember that from January 2018 Flight Safety Australia will appear monthly, in a new app form, with features and stories posted daily on the www.flightsafetyaustralia.com  website.



CASA Briefing Newsletter - October 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

I fully appreciate the words ‘regulatory reform’ and ‘regulatory change’ give rise to apprehension – at the least - amongst the aviation community. Modernising and improving the aviation regulations has been a drawn out process that has not always run smoothly. While the journey has been rough in places, 45 parts of the new regulations have in fact been made, with ten to be completed. The task of finishing this work was paused while issues with previous regulatory packages, such as the flight crew licensing suite, were addressed and new processes were put in place to manage regulatory development and transition. I can assure you that CASA has learnt lessons from the past and we are approaching the last stage of regulatory reform with a very different mindset. If the introduction of new regulations is to be successful it must be a more co-operative and streamlined process.

Genuine consultation is a key to successful change and the recently created Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and its supporting technical working groups are central to our new approach to regulatory reform. The Panel is structured to provide expert advice to CASA and, at the same time, ensure key leaders in Australian aviation fully understand the policies and positions CASA is taking on regulatory changes. The technical working groups will be an opportunity for subject matter experts to look closely at specific technical issues and proposals and provide advice to the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel before CASA finalises its position on regulations. Nearly 400 people have expressed an interest in contributing to the working groups and I thank everyone for their offer of assistance. We will be in touch with everyone soon with information on the next steps.

As we move forward with the completion of the new regulations there will be a lot of focus on the flying operations suite of regulations. This suite is made up of Parts 91, 119, 121, 133, 135 and 138 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Work on finalising these parts has started and I expect to see timely progress. My aim is to complete the development of the flying operations and other parts by the end of 2018, although the implementation and transition will naturally take longer. I do want to bring regulatory reform to an end as soon as possible, but I do not want to overburden the aviation community with the demands of change. As in many aspects of life, success will in part be determined by getting the balance right.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Work to improve engineer licensing regulations

An important step has been taken in making improvements to the regulations covering aircraft engineer licences and ratings. A special technical working group is being set up to find solutions to issues with the regulations and to make recommendations for changes to the regulations and supporting guidance material. The working group will be established by the new Aviation Safety Advisory Panel, which provides CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety high-level advice from the aviation community on safety and regulatory issues. The working group will be made up of people with expertise in the aviation maintenance sector who have expressed an interest in contributing formally to the process of improving the maintenance engineer licensing regulations. This action follows the release of submissions made to the post implementation review of Part 66 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, which covers maintenance licensing. A total of 70 submissions were made to the review, with three key areas of concern emerging. These are the regulations themselves and the associated manual of standards, issues with licences and aeroskills training. The regulations were described as too complex and supporting material not easily understood, there is a lack of understanding of privileges and limitations and type training is considered too complex and difficult.

Find out more about the review of the engineer licensing regulations and read submissions.

Tick of approval for new sport and recreational regs

New regulations to oversee the self-administration functions of organisations in the sport and recreational sector have received official aviation community support to be made into law. A final meeting of the sport and recreational aviation standards consultative subcommittee reviewed additional changes CASA proposes to make to Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. This followed public consultation on the draft of the regulations in 2016. The subcommittee formally endorsed the regulation changes, noting a few areas for clarification or future work. CASA will now work towards having the regulations finalised through the rule-making processes and signed by June 2018. The Part 149 regulations bring a new level of recognition and uniformity to the sport and recreational aviation sector by formalising a close and collaborative regulatory relationship between CASA and peak organisations.

Find out more about Part 149.

Just approach to safety enforcement

CASA’s commitment to its regulatory philosophy and a ‘just culture’ approach to safety regulation has been strengthened. A new instruction from the Director of Aviation Safety to CASA staff sets out limitations on the use of information that may show a contravention of the safety rules. The instruction clarifies how information can be used when CASA makes decisions about whether enforcement action may need to be taken. Individuals and organisations found to have violated a provision of the safety rules will be given an opportunity to address and correct safety issues without CASA initiating enforcement action. Enforcement action will only be taken where there is a deliberate, willful or reckless breach of the aviation safety rules, where there is a pattern of repeated misconduct or there is a failure to take appropriate corrective or necessary protective action while identified safety issues are addressed. The new instruction puts into practical effect key elements of CASA's regulatory philosophy. Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody says: "It is vital that CASA does not simply talk about 'just culture' but actively implements those principles into our day-to-day operations and decision making. Our rational approach to 'just culture' means that where honest errors or mistakes are made CASA looks to encourage and support the efforts of individuals and organisations to make necessary improvements, correct identified problems and ensure safety risks are effectively managed in the process. Individuals and organisations with an understanding and commitment to safety need to take responsibility for addressing safety shortcomings and where they demonstrate the ability and willingness to do this CASA need not take action. Of course, if the safety rules are deliberately flouted or action is not taken to address safety issues then CASA must and will take appropriate action.”

Get details of the safety information instruction.

Stronger drone rules

Stronger and clearer safety rules governing the flying of drones have been introduced to better protect people and aircraft from drones. The drone safety rules have been tightened in response to community concerns about the safety of drones and the rapid growth in drone numbers. The new requirements are set out in an interim formal direction that will apply until a full review of the drone regulations is completed. Recreational drones weighing more than 100 grams must now never be flown within three nautical miles of any controlled aerodrome. In addition, recreational drones weighing more than 100 grams must not be flown within three nautical miles of non-controlled aerodromes or helicopter landing sites if it is clear aircraft are operating there. Recreational drones of all weights must not be flown above 400 feet at any location, kept more than 30 metres from people who are not involved in controlling the drone and only one drone can be flown at a time. All drones – recreational and non-recreational – must now be kept away from areas where fire, police or other emergency operations are underway unless there is approval from the person in charge of the emergency operation. Existing rules prohibiting drones flying over and above crowds and groups of people and only allowing flights during the day and within visual line of sight still apply. Drones must never be flown in a way that creates a hazard to people, property or aircraft. CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said the new drone rules make the safety requirements clearer for people flying drones and will be easier to enforce. CASA is making it easier to operate drones safely with a new dedicated website setting out the rules and safe flying tips.

Get more on the drone safety rules at CASA’s new drone website.

New graphical weather forecasts

Changes are being made to aviation weather forecast formats. In response to requests from the aviation community the Bureau of Meteorology is changing the format of area forecasts from text based to graphical. The new format is known as a graphical area forecast and it will be introduced on 9 November 2017. The Bureau says the new forecast formats aim to improve safety and ease of flight planning. Graphical area forecasts will incorporate an image outlining the boundaries of different weather areas, will present information in a more accessible format and will rely less on complex location descriptions in long text strings. A pilot can look at the image and quickly see which weather areas are relevant to their flight. Graphical area forecasts will be accompanied by a table which outlines surface visibility and weather, cloud, icing, turbulence and the freezing level. The 28 forecast areas currently used will be amalgamated into ten larger graphical forecast areas, using names based on region instead of the current area numbering format. Graphical area forecasts will be valid for six hours, but two consecutive forecasts will be released at each issue time, providing a forecast for 12 hours.

Find out more about the new graphical area forecasts, including a user guide.

Cable inspection details released

Details of the new inspection regime required for primary flight control cable terminals have been released. The inspection regime replaces an earlier mandatory requirement to replace primary flight control cables after 15 years time in service. The primary flight control cable assemblies covered by the mandatory inspections have terminal fittings manufactured from SAE-AISI 303Se or SAE-AISI 304 stainless steel with 15 years or more time in service. Cable terminal fittings with an unknown time in service must be inspected. An examination must be carried out of the entire exposed surface of each cable terminal fitting using a 10X magnifier or borescope to look for any corrosion, pitting or cracking. Any cable with evidence of pitting, corrosion or cracking on the cable terminal fitting must be replaced. Under an airworthiness directive issued by CASA an initial inspection of affected cables must be carried out before 1 November 2018. Repeat inspections will be required every 12 months. Any cables that have previously been replaced do need not need repetitive inspections until they reach 15 years time in service. CASA took action on this issue following reports of multiple cable terminal failures and developed the inspection regime in the light of feedback from the aviation community.

Read the cable airworthiness directive.

Don’t miss a seminar for pilots

Safety seminars for pilots are being held at sixteen locations in November 2017. Avsafety seminars are at:

  • Cairns
  • Jandakot
  • Naracoorte
  • Swan Hill
  • Mount Gambier
  • Parafield
  • Coffs Harbour
  • Port Macquarie
  • Moorabbin
  • Esperance
  • Hobart
  • Toowoomba
  • Devonport
  • Murray Bridge
  • Canberra
  • Bunbury

The seminars will take pilots through previous accidents and incidents to learn valuable safety lessons. There is a focus on pilot decision making, flying within your limits and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents and incidents covering each phase of flight will be set out, with a mix of fixed wing and helicopter events to be examined. CASA's safety advisers ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.

Engineering seminars on now

Three aviation engineering seminars are being held in November 2017. Seminars will be held at:

  • Perth
  • Jandakot
  • Tyabb

The seminars are aimed at people in airworthiness roles such as engineers, the head of aircraft airworthiness and maintenance, continuing airworthiness management, air operators and training organisations. Topics to be covered will include the maintenance responsibilities of the registered operator, registration holder, responsible manager, aircraft owner and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer; defect reporting; tool control; and maintenance licence examples. CASA aims to support the professional development of people in safety critical roles by providing access to the latest best practice, information and resources. Importantly the seminars will also provide the opportunity to ask questions and raise issues with CASA.

Book your place at an engineering seminar.

In brief

Work on the independent review of the new fatigue rules is progressing well, with a report to be handed to CASA early in 2018. The review team is evaluating previous feedback to CASA on the fatigue changes, gathering additional information from representative organisations and examining a range of fatigue issues.

There are proposals to make changes to the manual of standards for Part 21 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, which covers certification and airworthiness requirements for aircraft and parts. Relevant Civil Aviation Orders and Australian Technical Standard Orders are proposed to be repealed and if necessary transferred into the Part 21 manual of standards. Comment by 8 November 2017.

CASA is currently hiring staff. Roles include flying operations, airworthiness and drone inspectors, along with a range of other regulatory positions in our offices around Australia. Applications close soon.

A review of airspace activity at Caboolture has found the operating environment is safe for current levels and complexity of aircraft activity. Concerns about the 12/30 runway designator should be raised with the Caboolture aerodrome operator.

Comment now on proposed updates to the rules for aerodrome operations. Proposals are to make Part 139 regulations more flexible and practical.

On 9 November 2017, changes to standard instrument departures and arrivals - SIDs and STARs – take effect. For pilots conducting a SID or STAR there is new phraseology, changes to charts and speed restrictions. Full details in aeronautical information circular H21/17.

CASA has responded to feedback from the helicopter sector and made changes to the requirements for helicopter aerial application endorsements. The change reduces the number of hours needed before an endorsement can be sought, subject to other requirements.

CASA- AMAS re Direction - Operations of certain unmanned aircraft [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Find below correspondence received from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority RPAS Branch:


Please find attached a letter regarding CASA's recently issued direction on the operations of certain unmanned aircraft.

CASA- AMAS re Direction - Operations of certain unmanned aircraft.

 

Sincerely,

 

Luke Gumley

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) Manager

RPAS Branch

CASA\Aviation Group

 

p: +61 8 8422 2922  m: +61 413 300 166 

Aviation House, 16 Furzer Street, Phillip ACT 2606

GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601

www.casa.gov.au 


Civil Aviation Safety Authority Instrument 96-17

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority  has just released a new Instrument regarding RPAS - CASA 96-17. [Links supplied  below with the Explanatory Statement]

The new Instrument is directed predominantly at the recreational drone sector.

The exact purpose is highlighted in the Explanatory Statement for this Instrument thus:

This legislative instrument gives directions to regulate the operation of certain unmanned aircraft in the interests of safety, particularly in relation to the operation of unmanned aircraft in the area of emergency operations, near aerodromes, and near people not associated with the operation of the aircraft.

The CASA 96-17 Instrument can be found here.

The CASA explanatory statement can be found here.

Further correspondence has been received from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and will be circulated in a separate email message. 

CASA-New recreational drone rules

20 October 2017

Members,

Received from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority:


CASA announced today new stronger and clearer rules for flying drones to help drone flyers operate with increased safety.

The new rules will better protect people and aircraft from drones and have been developed in response to community concerns about drone safety and the rapid increase in the number of drone operators.

They do not apply to all drone flyers. If you hold a remote pilot licence (RePL) and operate according to a remotely piloted aircraft operator certificate (ReOC) or have an authorisation from CASA, you will be exempt from the new measures. Model aircraft operating under CASA approvals are also exempt.

These new interim measures also make it clear that operating drones near a public safety or emergency operations is not permitted. CASA has also launched a new website called droneflyer.com.au that explains key safety rules for recreational drone flyers, using easy-to-understand language and clear and simple information graphics.

Droneflyer.com.au complements CASA's Can I fly there? free mobile app, which helps recreational and sub-2 kg drone operators fly safely by providing practical information about where they can and can't operate.

For specific details on the new measures and about flying drones commercially, visit www.casa.gov.au/drones

AMAS Inc Website 'Live Document'.

Members,

Please be advised:

The AMAS Inc website is a 'Live Document' (subject to change)and as such resulting from the September 2017 General Meeting changes as directed by the membership have been finalised. The revised Constitution and associated documents have been administered through the required government departments and have been uploaded to the website.

Kind regards,

The team at AMAS Inc.
10 dollar junior-boy

CASA Briefing Newsletter - September 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

On 4 September 2017 we took another a key step in re-setting the way CASA consults and engages with the aviation community. That was the date of the first meeting of the new Aviation Safety Advisory Panel, which has been set up to provide me with informed and objective high-level advice on current, emerging and potential issues and the way CASA performs its functions. The meeting was chaired by Professor Pat Murray and there was enthusiastic participation by all Panel members. The Panel agreed progress needs to be made quickly on a range of long-standing issues and that CASA should strive to develop the remaining new regulations by the end of 2018. Members also agreed action needs to be taken to streamline and recast consultation mechanisms.

The membership of the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel is drawn from representative groups including The Australian Aviation Associations Forum, the Regional Aviation Association of Australia, Recreational Aviation Australia and the Australian Airports Association, as well as the two largest airlines. This means the Panel delivers views and expert advice from a wide spectrum of Australian aviation and can focus on the ‘big picture’ issues from a policy perspective rather than individual or sector based interests. At the first meeting the Panel agreed that its work will be supported by technical working groups to be established as required from a pool of interested and suitably qualified people. These working groups, which will look at specific issues, will be tasked and guided by the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel to ensure alignment with agreed strategies and priorities. CASA will shortly be calling for expressions of interest from members of the aviation community interested in being involved in the technical working groups and other activities to support aviation safety.

Issues identified by the Panel for resolution as quickly as possible include pilot medical certification standards, radio frequency use in low level uncontrolled airspace, validation of the principles underpinning the development of the new flying operations suite of regulations, future policy directions to safely support growth in drones and concluding the outstanding actions from the aviation safety regulation review. I am very pleased there was common ground on the need to progress and close off these issues as they all have a high priority and must not be allowed to drag on. The Panel reviewed CASA’s guiding principles for the development and implementation of new safety regulations and, while agreeing they are sound, asked for them to be refreshed. This refresh will focus on a stronger emphasis on risk analysis, simplicity and clarity in the principles supporting the exercise of discretion, the 'uniqueness’ of the Australian aviation environment being seen as an exception rather than the default and timeliness.

You can find out more about the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and read the minutes of the first meeting.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Your views are in on low level frequencies

The results of consultation on radio frequency use in low level uncontrolled airspace have been released. An analysis of the responses to a CASA discussion paper shows a majority support using the MULTICOM frequency 126.7 at low levels in Class G airspace. Nearly 500 people provided online and written submissions to the discussion paper, which canvassed views on using the MULTICOM or designated Area VHF frequencies. Supporters of MULTICOM said this frequency has better coverage, high levels of established use and is straightforward to use as it is uniform in all regions. Submissions also emphasised a desire to separate air traffic control services from pilot broadcasts to reduce the risk of over-transmission. While there was majority support for the MULTICOM a number of submissions provided detailed arguments for using Area frequencies. Supporters of Area frequency use pointed to the safety and situational awareness benefits of access to air traffic control services. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority expressed support for Area frequency use due to its advantages for search and rescue, hazard alert broadcasts and information to pilots such as notification of airspace restrictions. A number of respondents also highlighted the importance of a uniform, robust approach to safety education that reinforces pilot responsibility and awareness. CASA will make a policy decision on the low level frequency use issue before the end of 2017. There will be additional consultation and a comprehensive education program for pilots following the decision.

Read the consultation report and submissions.

Comment now on aerodrome rule proposals

An important consultation exercise is underway as part of updating and improving the regulations covering aerodromes. CASA is seeking responses on 11 specific proposals to make changes to Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations and the associated manual of standards. The aim is to make the aerodrome safety requirements more streamlined, flexible and practical. CASA will also seek to reduce regulatory costs and burdens wherever possible. The current aerodrome regulations were made in 2003 and changes in technology, international standards and best practices mean an update is timely. One of the key proposed changes is simplifying the aerodrome certification system. Aerodrome certification would only be required where a terminal instrument flight procedure is provided at an aerodrome or an aerodrome operator chose to seek certification. The category of registered aerodromes would be abolished. This clearer and simpler system would bring a range of benefits to aerodrome operations, including reducing emergency preparedness costs for many aerodromes. Other proposed changes are developing more outcome based standards, introducing a graduated structure for certification requirements, changing requirements for technical inspections and introducing the position of an accountable manager for aerodrome operators. There is a proposed transition phase for the changes of one year for current certified aerodromes and two years for registered aerodromes. Transition would start one year after the amended rules were made.

Read the detailed aerodrome rule change proposals and comment by 8 December 2017.

Guidance on salvaged parts

Guidance on the steps to follow when fitting removed or salvaged parts to an aircraft have been released. The Civil Aviation Regulations allow components that have been removed or salvaged from an aircraft to be fitted to another aircraft as long as no maintenance needs to be carried out on the components. The components must not be damaged and they must comply with the manufacturer’s specifications. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA sets out five steps that should be followed when dealing with removed or salvaged parts. The continuing airworthiness records of the source aircraft should be examined to establish the condition of the component, the component should be removed in a controlled environment, a general visual inspection of the component should be done to detect any damage, the component should be carefully stored and records should be created to establish the traceability of the component. Only qualified personnel approved to replace the component should be used to carry out the removal. A person planning to fit a removed or salvaged component to an aircraft must have the agreement of the registered operator of that aircraft.

Find out more in the removed or salvaged parts airworthiness bulletin.

Lycoming engine warning

A range of Lycoming engines fitted to fixed wing aircraft and helicopters are at risk of premature connecting rod bush wear. The issue has caused five uncontained engine failures worldwide, with one reported in Australia. Two groups of Lycoming engines are affected – all engines new, factory rebuilt or factory overhauled in 2011 and engines repaired or overhauled using suspected non-conforming bushing identified in a Lycoming service bulletin. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA makes a number of strong recommendations to address the issues with both groups of engines. A US Federal Aviation Administration airworthiness directive requires inspections and corrective actions in relation to the second group of engines, which may have non-conforming bushing. These bushes are subject to progressive destruction causing fatigue cracking between adjoining components under normal engine operational loads. This can ultimately lead to fatigue failure of the piston pin end of the connecting rod, with associated damage to the crankcase, crankshaft, camshaft, cylinders and pistons. The CASA airworthiness bulletin says it is crucial any adverse indications or unusual behaviour during operation of an applicable engine yet to have the actions of the airworthiness directive performed are thoroughly investigated prior to further flight. Engine oil and oil filter inspections are effective in detecting problems with the first group of engines. CASA is asking for all Lycoming connecting rod little end bushing defects to be reported using the Defect Reporting Service.

Get full details in the Lycoming engine airworthiness bulletin.

Have your say on tests and checks

Proposals to simplify and streamline the flight testing and proficiency checking systems are now open for comment. The aim of the proposed changes is to make flight test and proficiency check standards easier to understand and apply. Changes are proposed to be made to the manual of standards for Part 61 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, which covers flight crew licensing. They involve flight test standards for Part 61 licences, ratings and endorsements and proficiency check standards for Part 61 ratings. Examiners have found the current format of the material to be inflexible, with aircraft equipment, operational practices or locations leading to difficulties in applying the standards. CASA has also found instances where several test and check items were addressing a common activity or manoeuvre, but used different terms. The purpose of the proposed amendments is to regularise the flight test and proficiency check standards across the testing and checking system so that common items are used in the manual of standards, flight test forms, the online flight test management system and the flight examiner handbook.

Comment on the proposed changes before 3 October 2017.

Aircraft flight test seminar in Perth

Aviation people in Western Australia who need to learn about aircraft flight testing should book a place in a special seminar now. CASA is holding an aircraft certification and flight testing seminar in November 2017 in Perth. The seminar explains the flight requirements associated with the aircraft type certification process. An overview is provided of the certification process, as well as a description of the flight test techniques and procedures pertinent to an applicable airworthiness standard. Safety during certification test flying is emphasised. Pilots, engineers and aviation managers involved in aircraft certification will all find the seminar useful and interesting. The information is particularly valuable to anyone involved in amateur aircraft building. The seminar is free but places are limited, so bookings are essential.

Book a place for the Perth aircraft flight testing seminar now.

Find out more about aircraft flight testing and evaluation.

Pilot safety seminars on now

CASA is holding safety seminars for pilots at eleven locations in October 2017. Avsafety seminars are at:

  • Loxton
  • Mittagong
  • Warnervale
  • Goolwa
  • Jindabyne
  • Broken Hill
  • Geraldton
  • Echuca
  • Camden
  • Kalgoorlie
  • Ayr

Pilots taking part in the seminars will look at previous accidents and incidents to learn lessons for the future. In focus will be pilot decision making, flying within your limits and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents and incidents covering each phase of flight will be set out, with a mix of fixed wing and helicopter events to be examined. CASA's safety advisers will ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.

Seminars for engineers

Five engineering safety seminars are being held in October 2017. Seminars will be held at:

  • Essendon
  • Cairns
  • Townsville
  • Airlie Beach
  • Mackay

The seminars are aimed at people in airworthiness roles such as engineers, the head of aircraft airworthiness and maintenance, continuing airworthiness management, air operators and training organisations. Topics to be covered will include the maintenance responsibilities of the registered operator, registration holder, responsible manager, aircraft owner and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer; defect reporting; tool control; and the maintenance licence examples. CASA aims to support the professional development of people in safety critical roles by providing access to the latest best practice, information and resources. Importantly the seminars will also provide the opportunity to ask questions and raise issues with CASA.

Book your place at an engineering seminar.

In Brief

AMAS 2017-18 AGM/GM Outcomes


The following nominees have been elected office bearers of the 2017-18 AMAS committee:

President: Mr Shane Hunter
Vice President: Mr Phillip Poole
Secretary: Mr Mike Snabaitis
Treasurer: Mr Rob Orrock
Committee officer: Mr Lex Cunningham

All four notices of motion, including the reduction in junior membership fee, have been voted by the AMAS membership in the affirmative. The website, being a 'live document', is being revised to reflect the outcomes.

A recording of the meeting, along with previous meeting recordings, can be found via the website here:


Partition for designated areas for model aircraft in Brisbane

Hi guys I was wondering if you could get this out to your Brisbane members as this is an important step in securing a council supplied and endorsed designated flying field for everyone in Brisbane who is not part of a club. 

Thanks 

Steven Gilbert

Brisbane Park Flyers 


Petition can be found here.


CASA Briefing Newsletter - August 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing

From Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

Everyone with an interest in remotely piloted aircraft should take a few minutes to read an important discussion paper issued by CASA.  This paper canvasses a range of key safety issues in relation to the recreational and commercial operation of drones.  The comments CASA receives on these issues will inform an important review of the safety regulation of the remotely piloted aircraft sector.  With the rapid growth in the numbers of drones and constant advances in technology a review is essential to address emerging risks, take account of international regulatory developments and keep pace with the views and expectations of the Australian community.  Estimate s indicate there are at least 50,000 recreational drones being flown around Australia today and there are more than 1100 certified remotely piloted aircraft operators.  The growth in these numbers shows no sign of slowing, meaning the safety and regulatory challenges are not abating.

The discussion paper covers five key issues.  These are: drone registration, training and education of drone operators, geo-fencing, counter drone technology and future approaches to drone aviation safety regulation.  The paper sets out issues to consider such as costs and overseas practice and poses questions for consideration.  I am pleased to say the initial response to the discussion paper has been strong, with hundreds of people taking the opportunity to have their say using our new consultation hub.  The consultation hub is easy to use, with text boxes to capture detailed comments, as well as simple questions to answer.  The discussion paper is open for comment until 22 September 2017.

While we are taking the time to consult on key issues about the future safety regulation of drones, this does not mean current activities within CASA in this area are static.  We have recently established a remotely piloted aircraft systems branch to strengthen our focus on the sector.  The new branch brings together operational and standards staff already working in this area into one team, as well as taking responsibility for regulatory services, safety oversight and enforcement, safety education and engagement.  I believe our new branch will deliver high quality safety, regulatory and educational outcomes for the remotely piloted aircraft sector, other airspace users and members of the public.

Have your say now on the remotely piloted aircraft systems discussion paper.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Review of fatigue rules underway

A team of leading international specialists is conducting an independent review of the new fatigue rules.  The review is benchmarking the new fatigue regulations against those of other leading aviation countries and regulators, including the European Aviation Safety Agency, New Zealand, the United States, United Kingdom and Canada.  It will also look at results of investigations into fatigue related accidents and incidents and how CASA's philosophy and approach to fatigue regulation compares with that of other transport regulators and high-risk industries.  The outcomes of the review will provide CASA with an informed basis for finalising the reform of the fatigue rules for air operators and pilots.  Dédale Asia Pacific has assembled a team of specialists to carry out the review, which will provide a full report and recommendations to the CASA Board early in 2018.  The specialists have experience and expertise in studying the effects of fatigue on operational performance in a range of safety critical industries, as well as developing and evaluating fatigue models.  They have worked with airlines and other transport operators to implement effective fatigue risk management systems.  CASA will extend the implementation period for new fatigue regulations by an additional six months to enable sufficient time for the review to be carried out and recommendations to be considered.  Air operators will be required to submit their draft operations manual changes or an application for a fatigue risk management system to CASA by 30 April 2018, and complete the transition to the new fatigue rules by 31 October 2018.

Find out more about the fatigue review.


Warning to check vintage aircraft spars

Owners and operators of a range of vintage De Havilland aircraft need to be aware of issues with replacement wing and aileron spars produced by the Croydon Aircraft Company of New Zealand.  These spars could be fitted to all variants of De Havilland DH60 Moth, DH82 Tiger Moth and DH83 Fox Moth aircraft.  Airworthiness directives and an airworthiness bulletin have been issued in relation to these wing and aileron replacement spars.  The airworthiness directives prohibit aerobatics or other flights involving high load factors in aircraft fitted with the identified Croydon replacement spars.  Owners, operators and maintainers must review aircraft records and determine if an affected spar is fitted to their aircraft.  In an airworthiness bulletin CASA asks for reports to be lodged where any Croydon spars are fitted to aircraft.  Reports should be made as soon as possible using the defect reporting service or the unapproved part form.  Additionally, if there is any evidence an affected aircraft has other Croydon Aircraft Company parts installed contact should be made with the manufacturer.  Advice should be sought in relation to the status of current manufacturing approvals for parts. In an information notice on the issue, the UK Civil Aviation Authority says some spars manufactured by the Croydon Aircraft Company appear not to comply with the original De Havilland drawings.  The most notable features are differences in the spindled cross-section of the spars.  These spars may be undersize with reduced structural reserves.  This issue is the subject of ongoing investigation by the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority.

Get all the details in the wing and aileron spar airworthiness bulletin.

Go to the airworthiness directives.


Service delivery a focus of new plan

CASA's latest corporate plan continues to focus on safety as the highest priority, while setting out how regulatory activity will be pragmatic, practical and proportional.  The Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester, released the 2017–18 CASA corporate plan, saying it is a strong blueprint for the future of aviation safety regulation in Australia.  Mr Chester said CASA will maintain and enhance a fair, effective and efficient aviation safety regulation system.  He said CASA will collaboratively engage with the aviation community to promote and support a positive safety culture and continually improve its organisational performance.  "I am particularly pleased to see CASA is committed to modernising its service delivery to meet the evolving needs of all sectors of Australian aviation," Mr Chester said.  "In 2017–18 CASA will develop a customer service charter that will shape the way it delivers client services.  It will optimise client service channel options and will drive a digital first approach to medical certification.  The overarching objective will be to create an efficient, simple and accessible experience for the people and organisations in aviation that conduct regulatory business with CASA."  Other important initiatives in the latest CASA corporate plan include a review of the safety regulatory strategy for remotely piloted aircraft systems, commencing implementation of the final tranche of regulatory reform, and continuing the implementation of the Government's response to the Aviation Safety Regulation Review.

Read the latest corporate plan.


New security card requirements

The Federal Government has made changes to a number of requirements for aviation security identification cards.  From 1 August 2017 people applying for aviation security identification cards – known as ASICs - must verify their identity in person with the body issuing their card.  Applicants will need to present their original identity documentation in person to the issuing body or their representative.  This requirement is in line with the practices used for obtaining other proof of identity documents such as passports or drivers licences.  People applying for an ASIC should check the issuing body they are using has a local representative who can verify their identity in person before lodging an application.  There are currently 46 organisations authorised to issue ASICs under the transport security arrangements administered by the Federal Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development.  The changes to ASIC requirements also include new categories of identification documents to ensure a more robust, risk-based approach to identity proofing.  Applicants need to provide identification documents covering four categories.  These include a birth certificate or naturalisation certificate, a government issued photographic proof of identity such as a drivers licence, a Medicare card or tax documents and evidence of a current residential address.  Certified copies of identification documents are not acceptable.  CASA can only issue ASICs to applicants with a defined operational need.  This means applicants must either hold a valid flight crew licence and a current medical certificate or be enrolled and undergoing training with a certified flying training organisation.

Find out more about the ASIC changes and requirements.


SIDs and STARs changes make communication clearer

Changes are coming to SIDs and STARs.  SIDs – standard instrument departures – and STARs – standard instrument arrivals – are the charted instrument procedure routes used for operating at suitably equipped aerodromes.  Various level and speed restrictions apply along the routes.  Standard communication procedures between air traffic control and pilots are used to avoid long and complex radio transmissions.  However, over time non-harmonised practices have been introduced and different phrases have been given different meanings.  The result is there can be a mismatch in understanding of SID and STAR communications between pilots and air traffic control.  The safety risks from this situation have led to action at the international level to harmonise SID and STAR communications.  From 9 November 2017 Australia will introduce changes to standard communication phraseology for SIDs and STARs in accordance with amendments published by the International Civil Aviation Organization.  This updated phraseology positively reinforces that the lateral, vertical and speed requirements embedded in a SID or STAR continue to apply unless explicitly cancelled or amended by an air traffic controller.  From 9 November 2017 there will also be changes to SID and STAR charts, arrival speeds, speed limitations based on airspace and general air traffic control speed restrictions.

Get full details on the SIDs and STARs changes in an aeronautical information circular.


Get to a seminar for pilots

Pilots at 14 locations have the opportunity to brush up their safety knowledge at AvSafety seminars in September 2017.  Safety seminars are being held at: Tamworth, Albany, Moree, Tyabb, Wollongong, Rawnsley Park, Wilpena Pound , Mount Isa, Rockhampton, Nhill, Cowra , William Creek, Clare Valley and Darwin.  Pilots taking part in the seminars will look at previous accidents and incidents to learn lessons for the future.  In focus will be pilot decision making, flying within your limits and hazards on arrival.  Case studies of accidents and incidents covering each phase of flight will be set out, with a mix of fixed wing and helicopter events to be examined.  CASA's safety advisers will ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer their own lessons.  The seminars have been developed with the support of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, Airservices Australia, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and the Bureau of Meteorology.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.


Warbird regulations transition complete

Most ex-military aircraft must now have a new limited category certificate to continue to operate.  This follows the end of the six month transition period for Part 132 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations.  The Part 132 regulations apply to owners, operators and pilots of limited category aircraft.  They also apply to individuals and organisations that conduct or sell adventure flights in warbirds.  Most owners and operators who needed to obtain a limited category certificate did so well before the 28 July 2017 deadline.  Under the new limited category regulations operations and airworthiness authorisations are managed by a self-administering organisation in cooperation with CASA.  The new rules require operators of adventure flights to provide an extra safety briefing at the point of sale – in person, online or over the telephone.  This briefing is in addition to a safety briefing given to all passengers before they board an aircraft for an adventure flight.  A warning placard must also be placed in the aircraft where it is visible to passengers.

Find out more about the rules for limited category aircraft.


Comment on limited category maintenance

Feedback is being sought on options for the future regulation of maintenance for limited category aircraft.  Maintenance of warbirds and other limited category aircraft is currently governed under a mix of the Civil Aviation Regulations, Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, Civil Aviation Orders and legislative instruments.  Now that a new set of operational regulations for limited category aircraft is in place under Part 132 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations there is an opportunity to make a change to maintenance arrangements.  A discussion paper has been issued setting out three options for comment.  The options are to retain the present regulatory structure, incorporate maintenance rules for limited category aircraft into Part 42 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations or create a maintenance subpart in the new Part 132 regulations.  The discussion paper sets out a range of issues associated with each option.  Everyone with an interest in warbirds and other limited category aircraft is asked to use CASA's new consultation hub to indicate which option they support and to provide detailed comments.

Read the limited category discussion paper and have your say before 15 September 2017.


AMAS Committee Nominations

President: Mr Shane Hunter
Secretary: Mr Mike Snabaitis
Treasurer: Mr Rob Orrock
Vice President: Mr Phillip Poole
Committee Officer: Mr Lex Cunningham

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND GENERAL MEETING-4 . Amendment Motion #4 Voting

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.


Members, please be advised that voting has opened.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom (https://zoom.us/)

11:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 9th September, 2017

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 26th August, 2017.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member

Note: The current Vice President will be retiring and not re standing.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now.  Refer Annex A  for currently received Notice of Motions / Nomination

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 9th August  2017.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 10th August  2017 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 23rd August  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 7th September.(if voting by email please return ballots to both: voting@amas.org.au  and secretary@amas.org.au )
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.



Annex A:


1.

The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

Motion to change the word control to administer in section of OBJECTS  3.1 which currently states:

"to associate into, control and coordinate under  a NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Flying Miniature Aircraft operations in Australia and all activities incidental thereto and to admit as Members of the Association persons interested in the advancement and encouragement of and participation in Flying Miniature Aircraft Activities in Australia"

 

Reason for this proposed change is to fully clarify the AMAS policy towards  control of members and clubs.

 

It is not now, nor ever has been the intention of the  AMAS Inc. to enforce Draconian regulations.

 

The AMAS believes in and promotes  the policies of Flying Together and Open Fields, and the right of clubs to implement their own procedures over and above the necessary compliance with the conditions of AMAS membership.

 

The Internal Management and operation of clubs is  rightly decided by their own membership and their committees as it should be.

 

 

 

2. The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

As a result of discussions with our Insurance Broker regarding certain Insurance Legislation the AMAS Committee wishes to put  forward the following Motion:

 

" That the Junior Membership fee be reduced to a nominal Fee of $10 per annum"

 

Reason being to assist parents financially and to encourage more Juniors to participate in our great Sport/hobby.

 

Whilst initially the Committee had proposed a zero fee, further investigation and discussion on the matter has resulted in the  previous motion already circulated to members being withdrawn,  as an amendment  to the previous motion would not be in compliance with the Associations Act.

 

3.  The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

Motion to remove Item E Day Membership from the Classes of  Membership

 

Remove 5.6 Day Membership

 

Remove 5.6.1, 5.6.2, 5.6.3, 5.6.4, 5.6.5, 5.6.6,a, b, c, d,.

 

Remove 5.6.7, 5.6.8, 5.6.9.

 

Reason being that AMAS has provided for Day membership for over 4 years and the Committee believes this class of membership is no longer warranted in the present day and age.

 

As AMAS has always promoted Flying Side by Side and Open Fields this form of membership was  originally instituted to allow for those persons requiring appropriate insurance and  cooperation with other modelling organisations in the formation years of this Society

 

However with the increased growth of Independent clubs now providing their own insurance coverage and numerous Insurance companies providing individual cover for modellers, the Committee believes  that Day membership is no longer required to be provided as Prospective Members are now adequately covered under AMAS insurance policies, Constitution and ByLaws,

 

 This will enable us to utilise the monies saved to further benefit our membership.


4.  From the AMAS Committee:  That the   Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, that in recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years is long overdue, and on that basis he will receive a very modest Honorarium of $1000.

4A. The following amendment to motion 4 has been received from Mr Ian Macgregor:


Mike, 

Please put forward my proposal :

The  AMAS Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, receive a very modest Honorarium of $6000 annually. This is in recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years and is long overdue. 

Thanks,

Ian Macgregor

4B. The following amendment to motion 4 has been received from Mr Robert Orrock and is confirmed and finalised as the notice of motion presented to the membership for voting:

I would like to propose that the AMAS secretary have his hard work and dedication be recognized with a $3000 annual honorarium. 

Regards,

R Orrock.

NFRM 1309OS - Remotely piloted aircraft systems [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

NFRM 1309OS - Remotely piloted aircraft systems

CASA has published Notice of Final Rule Making (NFRM) 1309OS - Remotely piloted aircraft systems.

On 14 May 2014, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) published Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) 1309OS - Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems - Amendments to CASR Part 101. The purpose of this NFRM is to set out CASA's disposition of comments received to the NPRM, which invited public comment on proposed changes to:

  • allow RPA with a gross weight of 2 kilograms and below to be used commercially without the requirement to hold a remote pilot licence (RePL) or an RPA operator's certificate (ReOC)
  • update the current terminology used within Part 101 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR) and bring it into line with the latest terminology used by ICAO as found in Annex 2 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation - Rules of the Air
  • clarify the current requirements for remote pilot training and certification
  • remove redundant requirements and simplify the process for approval.

This NFRM:

  • provides a background of the regulatory policy proposed and consultation undertaken
  • discusses the submissions made in response to NPRM 1309OS
  • provides an analysis of the responses and gives a CASA response and disposition
  • discusses the impact and gives an explanation of the changes
  • provides the final legislative changes and associated advisory materials.

CASA received 90 responses to the NPRM; comments varied widely, with many respondents having opposing points of view to each other about the same proposals. Two of the respondents established petitions with a total of 430 persons signing the petitions.

CASA would like to thank those who participated in the consultations on the issues addressed in the NPRM. The input of stakeholders who are directly or indirectly affected by change proposals is appreciated and valued in our regulatory development process.



Public consultation on DP 1708OS - Review of RPAS operations [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]



Public consultation on DP 1708OS - Review of RPAS operations

Tell us your views on drone regulation - CASA discussion paper released

Australia was one of the first countries in the world to produce legislation governing the operation of drones in 2002. CASA introduced significant amendments to Part 101 in September 2016 – that have been welcomed by some and questioned by others in the aviation industry and broader community.

CASA intends to publish the notice of final rulemaking for the September 2016 amendments next week. This information may assist you in your response to this discussion paper as it will summarise the consultation conducted, the feedback we received and our position regarding those comments.

Following the introduction of these amendments, CASA is now conducting a review of the safety benefits and cost effectiveness of current regulations for drone use in Australia. As part of the review, we have produced a discussion paper for consultation with the aviation community about the issues and concerns that have been raised since the amendments were made.

You can view the discussion paper and provide your feedback to CASA by 22 September 2017.

More information about Part 101 and flying drones in Australia can be found on the CASA website.


--

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND GENERAL MEETING-3. Amendment motion #4


 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom (https://zoom.us/)

11:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 9th September, 2017

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 26th August, 2017.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member

Note: The current Vice President will be retiring and not re standing.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now.  Refer Annex A  for currently received Notice of Motions / Nomination

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 9th August  2017.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 10th August  2017 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 23rd August  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 7th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.



Annex A:


1.

The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

Motion to change the word control to administer in section of OBJECTS  3.1 which currently states:

“to associate into, control and coordinate under  a NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Flying Miniature Aircraft operations in Australia and all activities incidental thereto and to admit as Members of the Association persons interested in the advancement and encouragement of and participation in Flying Miniature Aircraft Activities in Australia”

 

Reason for this proposed change is to fully clarify the AMAS policy towards  control of members and clubs.

 

It is not now, nor ever has been the intention of the  AMAS Inc. to enforce Draconian regulations.

 

The AMAS believes in and promotes  the policies of Flying Together and Open Fields, and the right of clubs to implement their own procedures over and above the necessary compliance with the conditions of AMAS membership.

 

The Internal Management and operation of clubs is  rightly decided by their own membership and their committees as it should be.

 

 

 

2. The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

As a result of discussions with our Insurance Broker regarding certain Insurance Legislation the AMAS Committee wishes to put  forward the following Motion:

 

“ That the Junior Membership fee be reduced to a nominal Fee of $10 per annum”

 

Reason being to assist parents financially and to encourage more Juniors to participate in our great Sport/hobby.

 

Whilst initially the Committee had proposed a zero fee, further investigation and discussion on the matter has resulted in the  previous motion already circulated to members being withdrawn,  as an amendment  to the previous motion would not be in compliance with the Associations Act.

 

3.  The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

Motion to remove Item E Day Membership from the Classes of  Membership

 

Remove 5.6 Day Membership

 

Remove 5.6.1, 5.6.2, 5.6.3, 5.6.4, 5.6.5, 5.6.6,a, b, c, d,.

 

Remove 5.6.7, 5.6.8, 5.6.9.

 

Reason being that AMAS has provided for Day membership for over 4 years and the Committee believes this class of membership is no longer warranted in the present day and age.

 

As AMAS has always promoted Flying Side by Side and Open Fields this form of membership was  originally instituted to allow for those persons requiring appropriate insurance and  cooperation with other modelling organisations in the formation years of this Society

 

However with the increased growth of Independent clubs now providing their own insurance coverage and numerous Insurance companies providing individual cover for modellers, the Committee believes  that Day membership is no longer required to be provided as Prospective Members are now adequately covered under AMAS insurance policies, Constitution and ByLaws,

 

 This will enable us to utilise the monies saved to further benefit our membership.


4.  From the AMAS Committee:  That the   Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, that in recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years is long overdue, and on that basis he will receive a very modest Honorarium of $1000.

4A. The following amendment to motion 4 has been received from Mr Ian Macgregor:


Mike, 

Please put forward my proposal :

The  AMAS Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, receive a very modest Honorarium of $6000 annually. This is in recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years and is long overdue. 

Thanks,

Ian Macgregor

CASA Briefing Newsletter - July 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]



CASA Briefing

July 2017

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Graeme Crawford

CASA has taken an important step in gaining access to additional safety information about foreign airlines. We have signed a memorandum of understanding with the International Air Transport Association – IATA - to access their safety audit reports. The IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) program is an internationally recognised and accepted evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. All IATA members are IOSA registered and must remain registered to maintain IATA membership. CASA will use the IOSA information to complement the existing oversight and surveillance of foreign airlines. It will also be used as part of the assessment process for new foreign carriers seeking authorisation to operate to Australia. In the future we expect to have access to IOSA information in relation to Australian carriers, which will be used to support our existing audit and surveillance work. CASA worked closely with IATA to understand their audit processes, quality assurance arrangements and management of approved auditors. Australia is the first nation in the Asia-Pacific region to use IOSA as part of the safety oversight of airlines. The use of the information will benefit airlines as it will make CASA’s surveillance and audits even more efficient and effective. IATA senior vice president safety and flight operation, Gilberto Lopez-Meyer, has said sharing IOSA information with regulators reduces the burden and costs of safety oversight. Agreements to share IOSA information are already in place with the US Federal Aviation Administration, the European Aviation Safety Agency and China.

Find out more about IOSA.

Regards
Graeme Crawford

(CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, is on leave)


Learn from sport close calls

No pilot wants to have a close call in the air. But they do happen and while they can be frightening or even embarrassing at the time, they can also be a valuable part of aviation safety education. To help pilots involved in sport aviation learn from the close calls of their colleagues CASA has published a new booklet containing 17 real life stories. They have been grouped under decision making, distractions, and errors, slips and omissions. In the introduction to the booklet it is pointed out that between 75 and 80 per cent of aviation accidents result from some type of human error. Skill based errors are the most common, followed by decision making and violations. While not all errors lead to tragic outcomes, there were 11 fatal accidents in sports aviation in 2016. The message from the close call stories is that diligence, proper planning and sound airmanship can avert disastrous outcomes. The close call stories cover ballooning, gyroplanes, recreational aircraft, hang gliding, gliding, paragliding and parachuting.

Order a copy of sport aviation close calls.

Horizontal situation indicator belt failure

A warning has been issued about the premature failure of drive belts in a horizontal situation indicator. Belts are reported to have failed in the Century Flight Systems horizontal situation indicator model number NSD360. The criticality of these belts failing in service is considered major if the instrument is the primary source of directional information. Failure of this instrument is considered hazardous if there is an undetected accuracy error of more than 10°. The failures are not associated with a failure flag. The drive belts, with part number 30B437, are currently lasting between 3 to 12 months in service before failing. After approximately 60-100 hours the belts are starting to fray and weaken, resulting in failure soon after. The belt is comprised of a number of load carrying tensile cords and the construction of the belt has changed. CASA has been in correspondence with the US Federal Aviation Administration office which oversights Century Flight Systems and will provide more information as it is available.

Go to the horizontal situation indicator drive belt airworthiness bulletin.

Revamped training course for flight examiners

A revamped training course has been released for people who want to gain a flight examiner rating or flight examiner endorsement. The flight examiner rating course now provides better support for flight examiner applicants by combining eLearning, a classroom workshop, industry mentoring, an interview and a flight test conducted by CASA. The course is competency based and prepares flight examiner applicants to conduct flight tests and proficiency checks under Part 61 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 – the flight crew licensing suite. It provides training and assessment for the 11 flight examiner rating endorsements, covering both aeroplane and helicopter categories. The course recognises existing flight examiner qualifications. In conjunction with the new course the flight examiner handbook and all flight test and proficiency check forms have been updated. The revised handbook has been designed so that each flight test and proficiency check chapter stands alone and can be used as a practical guide. The chapters are presented according to a chronological template on how to plan, conduct and complete a flight test and proficiency check. The flight test and proficiency check forms have been redesigned into a plain English checklist style.

Get more on the new flight examiner rating course.

Training module for performance-based navigation

Satellite based navigation is now the corner stone of instrument flight rules aircraft operations across Australia. This means it is important for many pilots to have an understanding of the requirements and benefits of this technology, known as performance based navigation or PBN. All instrument flight rules aircraft operating in Australian airspace must be fitted with global navigation satellite system receivers for performance based navigation. To help pilots better understand performance based navigation CASA has released a new on-line eLearning tool which covers key elements of the technology and regulatory requirements. The tool has information on aircraft equipment, pilot licensing, operational requirements and continuing airworthiness. It also covers navigation specification requirements, deeming provisions and CASA approvals. There are links to the relevant regulations. The eLearning does not replace the formal training pilots must undertake to use performance based navigation but it provides an overview of the requirements of on-board navigation equipment and the navigation specifications that must be included in flight plans.

Go to the performance based navigation eLearning now.

Regulatory philosophy explained

There’s an easy and quick way to get a solid understanding of CASA’s regulatory philosophy. The key elements of the regulatory philosophy have been captured in a short video on CASA’s YouTube channel. There are ten principles in the regulatory philosophy that underpin the way CASA will perform its functions, exercise its powers and engage with the aviation community. The updated regulatory philosophy was developed in response to a recommendation in the Aviation Safety Regulation Review. The regulatory philosophy covers issues such as trust and respect, risk-based action and decision making, consultation and collaboration, consistency and flexibility and regulatory costs. CASA’s general manager Legal Affairs, Regulatory Policy and International Strategy presents the video on the regulatory philosophy. He says CASA must set an example to the aviation community by demonstrating what it means to be a responsible regulator. The video also looks at what is meant by just culture and how the regulatory philosophy dovetails with safety management.

Watch the regulatory philosophy video now.

Perth, Pilbara, Wellcamp airspace reviews

Three airspace reviews have been completed – at Perth, Pilbara and Brisbane West Wellcamp. The reviews found the airspace arrangements at the three locations were suitable and safe, although improvements could be made to enhance efficiency and awareness. The Perth review found there had been a reduction in airspace incidents over the last five years and most issues were not safety related but about airspace access and clearance delays. A need for more targeted education of pilots was identified following training incidents at Jandakot and failures to comply with air traffic control instructions. There should also be more consultation to determine the cause of airspace infringements and possible mitigation options. The Pilbara review looked at airspace 125 nautical miles around the Paraburdoo radar. While aircraft movements in the area have been decreasing after a period of rapid growth, traffic could increase if mining activity changes. Very high frequency radio coverage at lower levels remains an issue, with communication with the Melbourne air traffic services centre a concern. It was recommended that Airservices should investigate the introduction of a chart to cover the major mining aerodromes in the Pilbara region. The Brisbane West Wellcamp and Oakey airspace review found the airspace is fit for purpose and can accommodate forecast future growth. Ten recommendations were made, including a further detailed review to be conducted no later than 2020.

Read the airspace reviews:

Seminars on now for pilots

Twelve of the popular AvSafety seminars for pilots are being held in August 2017. They are at: Bendigo, Parkes, Katherine, Orange, Taree, Ballina, Gove, Port Lincoln, Port Augusta, Yarrawonga, Aldinga and Albury. The seminars will get pilots talking about key safety issues by looking at previous accidents and incidents where the outcomes were both good and bad. They will focus on pilot decision making and look at flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents and incidents covering each phase of flight will be set out, with a mix of fixed wing and helicopter events to be examined. CASA’s safety advisers will ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer lessons learned. The seminars have been developed with the support of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, Airservices Australia, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and the Bureau of Meteorology.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.

Engineers – seminars for you

Five engineering safety seminars are being held in August 2017. Seminars will be held at: Darwin, Launceston, Hobart, Moorabbin and Gove. These seminars are aimed at people in airworthiness roles such as engineers, the head of aircraft airworthiness and maintenance, continuing airworthiness management, air operators and training organisations. CASA aims to support the professional development of people in these safety critical roles by providing access to the latest best practice, information and resources. Importantly the seminars will also provide the opportunity to ask questions and raise issues with CASA. Topics to be covered will include the maintenance responsibilities of the registered operator, registration holder, responsible manager, aircraft owner and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer; defect reporting; tool control; and the maintenance licence examples.

Book your place at an engineering seminar.

Drone flyers fined for safety breaches

Three people flying recreational drones in breach of the safety regulations have been fined a total of $3240. Penalties were issued for operating a drone over an Easter egg hunt, a wedding and for flying in Sydney Harbour restricted airspace. The operator of the drone at Sydney Harbour was also fined for flying within 30 metres of people not involved in the operation. The fines are the latest in penalties imposed by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority for breaching the drone safety rules. A group of children at a Canberra Easter egg hunt were put at risk by a drone flown at a height from which if the drone malfunctioned it would not have been able to clear the area. The drone pilot was fined $900. A $900 fine was also issued for hazardous flying at and near guests at a wedding in regional NSW. All three drone pilots paid the penalties issued by CASA. CASA's Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said fines will continue to be issued where people break the drone safety rules. "The rules protect people, property and aircraft from drones," Mr Carmody said. "If you fly a drone it is your responsibility to fly by the rules and stay safe at all times. "Every drone pilot should download CASA's drone safety app, which will help them fly safely."

Get the CASA drone safety app.



NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND GENERAL MEETING.-2

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom (https://zoom.us/)

11:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 9th September, 2017

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 26th August, 2017.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member

Note: The current Vice President will be retiring and not re standing.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now.  Refer Annex A  for currently received Notice of Motions / Nomination

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 9th August  2017.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 10th August  2017 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 23rd August  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 7th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.



Annex A:


1.

The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

Motion to change the word control to administer in section of OBJECTS  3.1 which currently states:

“to associate into, control and coordinate under  a NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Flying Miniature Aircraft operations in Australia and all activities incidental thereto and to admit as Members of the Association persons interested in the advancement and encouragement of and participation in Flying Miniature Aircraft Activities in Australia”

 

Reason for this proposed change is to fully clarify the AMAS policy towards  control of members and clubs.

 

It is not now, nor ever has been the intention of the  AMAS Inc. to enforce Draconian regulations.

 

The AMAS believes in and promotes  the policies of Flying Together and Open Fields, and the right of clubs to implement their own procedures over and above the necessary compliance with the conditions of AMAS membership.

 

The Internal Management and operation of clubs is  rightly decided by their own membership and their committees as it should be.

 

 

 

2. The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

As a result of discussions with our Insurance Broker regarding certain Insurance Legislation the AMAS Committee wishes to put  forward the following Motion:

 

“ That the Junior Membership fee be reduced to a nominal Fee of $10 per annum”

 

Reason being to assist parents financially and to encourage more Juniors to participate in our great Sport/hobby.

 

Whilst initially the Committee had proposed a zero fee, further investigation and discussion on the matter has resulted in the  previous motion already circulated to members being withdrawn,  as an amendment  to the previous motion would not be in compliance with the Associations Act.

 

3.  The AMAS committee is proposing a change to the Constitution in accordance with the Current Rules and Legislation.

 

Motion to remove Item E Day Membership from the Classes of  Membership

 

Remove 5.6 Day Membership

 

Remove 5.6.1, 5.6.2, 5.6.3, 5.6.4, 5.6.5, 5.6.6,a, b, c, d,.

 

Remove 5.6.7, 5.6.8, 5.6.9.

 

Reason being that AMAS has provided for Day membership for over 4 years and the Committee believes this class of membership is no longer warranted in the present day and age.

 

As AMAS has always promoted Flying Side by Side and Open Fields this form of membership was  originally instituted to allow for those persons requiring appropriate insurance and  cooperation with other modelling organisations in the formation years of this Society

 

However with the increased growth of Independent clubs now providing their own insurance coverage and numerous Insurance companies providing individual cover for modellers, the Committee believes  that Day membership is no longer required to be provided as Prospective Members are now adequately covered under AMAS insurance policies, Constitution and ByLaws,

 

 This will enable us to utilise the monies saved to further benefit our membership.


4.  From the AMAS Committee:  That the   Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, that in recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years is long overdue, and on that basis he will receive a very modest Honorarium of $1000.


Flight Safety Australia - July-August 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


Flight Safety Australia July–August 2017 out now!

Download the magazine app on your Apple or Android device.

Flight Safety Australia News Site, Download in the App Store, Download from Google Play

  

The lead story of Flight Safety Australia’s July–August edition looks at how artificial intelligence could influence aviation. The machine-learning technology that gives computers subtle skills comparable with, and in some cases greater than, those of humans is already offered in some avionic packages. The question is what it will evolve into.

The issue also looks back 70 years to the introduction of the Beechcraft Bonanza in 1947. The venerable type’s 70th birthday is an opportunity to reflect on the changes and continuities in general aviation.

Contributor Adrian Park examines the pressures and situations that can lead airline crews into costly and dangerous runway overruns. He looks at three incidents in Thailand, the US and Indonesia.

Thomas P. Turner urges general aviation pilots to use their ears and other senses to understand what their aircraft are trying to say to them. Potentially deadly accidents can be avoided by the combination of developing mechanical sympathy and taking the time before, during and after flight to look, listen and feel for problems and issues. In Dancing with the STARs Kreisha Ballantyne examines the topic of safely mixing with scheduled traffic and other larger aircraft in the vicinity of the aerodrome. It’s a plea for planning and consideration.

An incident on a Royal Flying Doctor Service aircraft highlights the problems involved with subtle failures of advanced technology. Looking at a simpler, but equally important technology, Hot and Confused debunks a misconception caused by unclear labelling of engine bay flammable fluid hoses.

There are also stories on electric taxi systems for transport aircraft, how accurately chronological age predicts pilot performance, and the Safety in Mind series looks at Professor Patrick Hudson’s scale of safety cultures.

The popular quiz and reader-submitted close calls round out a packed issue.

Don’t forget there are two ways to keep up-to-date with Flight Safety Australia’s coverage of all the latest aviation safety news and issues. Download the magazine tablet app from the App Store or from Google Playand enjoy the interactive bi-monthly magazine experience, complete with video and audio. Once you’ve downloaded the issue, you can read it offline at your leisure. And for daily aviation safety updates, as well as all the bi-monthly magazine articles, subscribe to the magazine’s news site: www.flightsafetyaustralia.com



Notice of Annual and General Meeting.

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Google Hangout (or video conference TBA)

11:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 9th September, 2017

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.

NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 26th August, 2017.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member

Note: The current Vice President will be retiring and not re standing.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now.  Refer Annex A  for currently received Notice of Motions / Nomination

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 9th August  2017.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 10th August  2017 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 23rd August  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 7th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.



Annex A:


1.From the AMAS Committee:  "To promote and encourage Juniors to participate in our sport/hobby, the Society will offer a zero membership fee in order that they may be able to join our great organisation at no cost whatsoever to themselves or parents."

2.From the AMAS Committee:  That the   Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, that in recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years is long overdue, and on that basis he will receive a very modest Honorarium of $1000.

3. From the AMAS Committee:  That 'Day Membership' be removed as a "class of member" from the AMAS inc Constitution.


CASA Briefing Newsletter - May 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CASA Briefing

May 2017

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

I would like to sincerely thank everyone who took the time to respond to two important consultation documents released by CASA in recent months. A total of 160 submissions were made in response to the medical certification standards discussion paper, while 494 people responded to the discussion paper on frequency use at low levels in class G airspace. The comprehensive medical discussion paper set out a range of medical certification issues and options. Options ranged from continuing existing medical requirements to developing a new medical certificate for the sport and recreational sectors. The class G frequency paper put forward two options for radio broadcasts in the vicinity of aerodromes in class G airspace that are not marked on aeronautical charts. They were to use the appropriate area frequency or the MULTICOM frequency 126.7. Both these issues have attracted vigorous debate within groups in the aviation community for some time and CASA recognised the need to formally canvass the views of everyone who wanted to have their say. I believe the solid response to the papers has shown CASA took the right approach in undertaking formal consultation.

We have now published 70 responses to the medical certification paper on the CASA web site. These were responses where the person or organisation agreed to their submissions being published. Most of the leading aviation organisations submitted a response, including the Aerial Application Association of Australia, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the Australian Airline Pilots Association, Recreational Aviation Australia and the Sports Aircraft Association of Australia. I also thank the many individuals who wrote their own submissions. CASA will now engage an independent party to develop a report on the medical certification submissions so we can clearly understand the views that have been presented on the various options. This will equip CASA to make decisions on potential changes to the medical certification system. A similar report will be created on the submissions to the class G frequency paper to facilitate timely decision making on the relevant issues. I can assure everyone that CASA is committed to finalising positions on both medical standards and the class G frequency as quickly as is possible, while not rushing into inappropriate decisions. Your comments and views are at the core of our decision making process.

Read the medical certification submissions.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety


Defect reporting is vital

The aviation community is being reminded of the importance of reporting aircraft defects to CASA. The new defect reporting service is easier to use and makes reported data more accessible to the aviation community. Aircraft operators, maintainers and manufacturers must submit a report for each malfunction, failure or defect that occurs under the relevant reportable categories. In addition, any defect which has endangered or may endanger the safe operation of an aircraft must be reported. The information on defects is carefully assessed by CASA to provide information that can be used to make sound regulatory decisions and to provide important advice to aircraft operators and maintainers. The defect reporting service allows users to share industry experience and assist in the early identification of potential issues. While some failures in aircraft parts are random, the probability of failure can often be estimated based on previous failure data. Historical failure analysis can be of value in determining inspection intervals and failure modes, particularly for components maintained on condition.

Find out more about defect reporting in an airworthiness bulletin.

New way to keep cables safe

CASA will soon be seeking comment on the details of a new approach to keeping primary flight control cable assemblies safe. The new approach will offer an inspection regime instead of the mandatory replacement of all affected flight control assemblies at 15 years’ time in service. This will provide relief from the cost and time needed to replace all affected flight control assemblies. An airworthiness directive issued in early 2015 - AD/GENERAL/87 Primary Flight Control Cable Assembly Retirement – put in place the mandatory replacement regime. The directive covered primary flight control cable assemblies with terminals constructed of SAE-AISI 303 Se or SAE-AISI 304 stainless steel with a total time in service of 15 years or more. The requirements of this airworthiness directive take effect from 1 January 2018. As the airworthiness directive currently stands this means flight control cable assemblies on affected aircraft that have already reached or exceeded 15 years’ time in service must be replaced before 1 January 2018. However, CASA will soon be issuing a proposed airworthiness directive which will put forward amendments to the current airworthiness directive, AD/GENERAL/87. The aviation community will be asked to comment on the proposed amendments before CASA finalises the new control cable assembly airworthiness requirements. CASA has now agreed that inspections - if performed in a particular and thorough manner - can satisfactorily address the risks of cracking and failure of control cable assemblies. The repeating inspection regime will require detailed inspection for evidence of corrosion and fraying, which if found, will require cable replacement.

New app to keep drones safe

A new smartphone app has been released to make flying drones safer. The app clearly shows crucial drone no-fly zones and drone fly with caution zones for drones operated in the under two kilogram commercial category. This information can also be used as guide for recreational drone flyers and certified remotely piloted aircraft operators. The app uses a drone flyers location to display no-fly zones around major airports, the flight paths of smaller airports and helicopter landing areas. Users will also see restricted and military airspace where drones must not be flown. The drone no-fly zones are shaded in red on the map. Orange shading is used to show fly with caution zones around areas where aircraft are known to operate at low altitudes. It is the first time an official app has been released in Australia to help drone flyers stay safe and abide by the safety regulations. Information is also shown for uncontrolled aerodromes and aircraft landing areas, with written advice about what to do when flying a drone in those locations. The app has been produced with specialist drone software company Drone Complier and will be available in Android, iOS and web-based HTML5.

Get the “Can I fly there?” drone app now.

Watch before you fly the outback

Winter is a great time to go flying in outback and remote areas of Australia. Before pilots take off for less populated areas they should take time to watch Out-n-Back Two. This is a spectacular aviation safety video mini-series for visual flight rules and recreational pilots. The ten part series covers a 3350 nautical mile trip from western NSW, through outback Queensland to Cape York, down the Queensland coast and back across country to Bathurst. The journey delivers a hands-on explanation of nearly 30 safety topics critical to all stages of flight. These include knowing your aircraft, weight and balance, fuel management, remote flying, fatigue management, radio calls, ageing aircraft, bird strikes, remotely piloted aircraft, emergency procedures and electronic flight bags. The safety information is delivered during interviews with local aviation people with expertise in each topic. The ten online videos feature stunning footage taken from cameras mounted on a Cessna 172 flown by chief flying instructor Catherine Fitzsimons.

Watch Out-n-Back series two now.

Jabiru wing bolts must be replaced

A requirement to replace wing attachment bolts on Jabiru aircraft has been issued. CASA has published an airworthiness directive calling for replacement of the quarter inch wing attachment bolts before or on reaching 2000 hours’ time-in-service. The replacement is to be done in accordance with a service bulletin issued by the manufacturer Jabiru. The service bulletin says all Jabiru aircraft feature strut braced wings with the root of each wing attached to the fuselage through two bolted joints loaded in shear. At manufacture these joints are secured using AN4 bolts. The service bulletin adds: “Examination of several airframes which have reached 5000 hours’ time-in-service revealed one only original AN4 bolt that was not in acceptable condition. The bolt was never replaced during the 5000 hour period. As a precautionary measure a 2000 hour life is now imposed on all AN4 wing attachment bolts, both the front and back.” CASA’s airworthiness directive says aircraft which have already reached 2000 hours’ time-in-service, must have bolts replaced before the next 100-hour or annual maintenance inspection, whichever occurs first. The airworthiness directive took effect on 22 May 2017.

More details in the CASA airworthiness directive.

Read the Jabiru service bulletin.

Remote pilot licence changes

Changes to the training requirements for remote pilot licences take effect from 1 June 2017. From this date all practical training to obtain a remote pilot licence must be done through an organisation holding a remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificate with a training approval. There are currently 36 organisations approved to provide practical remotely piloted aircraft training. The change means practical training can no longer be done through remote aircraft manufacturers or their agents unless they have a certificate and training approval. CASA has made the change to ensure all practical training is conducted by organisations that have an approved syllabus, qualified instructors, suitable facilities and appropriate record keeping. Practical training is carried out in the category of remotely piloted aircraft to be operated – fixed wing, helicopter or multirotor. Most people will complete their practical training on a remotely piloted aircraft with a maximum take-off weight of less than 7 kg and are limited to that weight class. People completing their practical remotely piloted aircraft training are required to have a minimum of five hours flight time logged on their aircraft type. Along with the practical training applicants must complete aviation theory training. This can be done in combination with the practical training provided by approved organisations, forming a complete remote pilot licence training package. It can also be completed by passing a CASA ground theory examination. CASA will continue to recognise practical training courses completed before 1 June 2017 conducted by drone manufacturers or their agents.

Get more information about remote pilot licences.

Seminars for pilots on now

CASA is holding eight safety seminars for pilots around the nation during June 2017. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled at Horsham, Bunbury, Bankstown, Cessnock, Horn Island, Scone, Gold Coast and Archerfield. Seven of these seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft. One of the seminars – Bunbury – will include a refresher on weather forecasts and a summary of accident/incident statistics over recent years. Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate fuel management and partial power loss as the cause of a high number of accidents. Lessons will be learnt from past accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. All the seminars provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book your place for an AvSafety Seminar now.

Aviation ‘whatdunit’ takes mystery out of new regs

Air operators and pilots in Darwin have the chance to take part in a real life aviation whodunit in early June 2017. CASA is holding a crash scene investigation workshop to learn lessons from a Piper Chieftain accident and to apply those lessons to the need for key regulatory changes. The CSI workshop will be looking at how safety can be improved by more appropriate regulations for charter and small regular public transport operations. To understand the need for change participants will look in detail at the factors behind the Chieftain accident, which happened in poor weather conditions. A team of CASA specialists - with expertise in accident investigations, air traffic control and psychology - will be joined by an expert from the Bureau of Meteorology. The panel will work through the accident and then invite people taking part in the workshop to make linkages with more effective safety management through best practice regulations. Those attending will have a greater appreciation of the logic behind proposed changes to Parts 135 and 119 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, as well as how to be prepared for the changes. Part 135 will cover air transport operations in small aeroplanes and will set a common level of safety for what are currently classified as charter and regular public transport operations. The Darwin CSI workshop is free, will be held on Saturday 3 June 2017 from 10:00 to 15:30, with a light lunch provided.

Book your place at the Darwin CSI workshop now.

For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.

AMAS Inc UPDATE / RENEWAL INFORMATION 2017-2018

Members,

 

Please be advised:

 

UPDATE /  RENEWAL INFORMATION 2017-2018

 

The AMAS Inc Committee hope that the past year has treated you well and that you had many happy landings. AMAS Inc continues to grow with members in every state and territory and we hope that you’ll continue to renew with us.

 

As many of you may be aware, the CASA has now formally approved the society’s application, among other matters, to allow FPV flying. AMAS Inc works very closely with the regulator and you can expect a few more updates in the coming months ahead. The AMAS is considered an authority by CASA and trust our relationship with the CASA will only strengthen in to the future.


 Member fees.

On June 1st early membership renewal is open for the 2017/2018 financial year covering the period July 1st2017 until June 30th /2018 offering all the benefits that AMAS membership provides members and clubs.

The fees are as follows (and are again reduced!):

 

12    Month Membership $45 Senior and $22 Juniors

 

The Future.

 

Our hobby is about family, friends and having fun.  We thought about reducing our fees again this year(via Treasurer/Budget projections) and of which you can see above we have(within 10% of current fees as per the Constitution)! However an idea was put forward further to this subject to reduce fees, for example adjust the senior fee and the money offset could be used to fund juniors. (As you can see we've reduced the fees anyway).This small amount is an investment in the future of the hobby whilst reaffirming our commitment to promoting the family and friends aspect of the hobby.

 

The AMAS Committee will be submitting a Motion to be put to the members at the Annual General meeting, for a vote by the entire  membership , as per the Constitution.

(http://www.amas.org.au/hosted/org/67/docs/68a5a0f0/AMASCONSTITUTIONAMENDED03October2015.pdf)

 

Motion: “To promote and encourage Juniors to participate in our sport/hobby, we will offer a zero membership fee in order that they may be able to join our great organisation at no cost whatsoever to themselves or parents.”

 

The entire membership is encouraged to consider the matter and provide feedback/variation to the matter.

 

Now is a great time to join up potential members!

.

The AMAS Committee hope it will encourage the younger generation to embrace the joys of aeromodelling in the coming years.

 

We trust this motion will be supported by our ever increasing membership!

 

 Earlier this year it was decided that due to the ever increasing workload of our Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, that in

recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years is long overdue, and on that basis he will receive a very modest Honorarium of $1000 at the end of this financial year. All other Committee members are volunteers and receive no remuneration. Minor expenses are reimbursed. This is many, many thousands of dollars less than people in other organisations receive for an equivalent number of members, and of course is only a pittance in terms of the hours spent on the affairs of this Society.

 

In accordance with his previous comments made over the last 18 months ,we wish to advise that our current Vice President and Life member Mr John Taylor will not be standing for any positions on the AMAS Committee at the Annual General Meeting later in the year, as he is retiring and  intending to spend more of his time just building and flying.

Having by then reached the grand age of 81 it is his time to move on and watch younger people come up with fresh ideas to grow our Society and Sport/hobby. We wish him well in total retirement!

 

Many of you expressed an interest in joining the committee, as noted in the recent member survey and we look forward to hearing from you. Simply phone of email the secretary for more information. You do not need any experience and we need people from all walks of life from across Australia. So what are you waiting for …..  Get involved today.

 

Finally we would remind all members and clubs to check out our website(as it is a 'Live' document) for any changes  that have occurred in the last year, and to get in early to renew your membership from June 1stwhen a reminder Bulletin will be sent out with all the details for the coming year.

 

*An update regarding the Loganholme Aeromodellers Radio Control Society (LARCS) which was devastated in the recent TC Debbie aftermath: The President Mr Michael Davis advised that operations will shortly recommence after much Logan Council, external and club member action cleaning up. The LARCS President also sends thanks on behalf of the LARCS membership for the overwhelming assistance given after the event and thanks the AMAS Inc membership for the kind donation for five thousand dollars towards disaster relief.

 

On behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

 

 

 

Changes to approved training for commercial drone operation.

Changes to approved training for drone operation

Tuesday 17 May 2017

The practical training requirements for gaining an Australian Remote Pilot Licence (RePL) will change from 1 June 2017.

The changes were set when amendments to Civil Aviation Safety Regulations Part 101commenced on 29 September 2016.

A RePL is required if you are operating a drone outside of the standard operating conditions applicable to the excluded category.

The excluded RPA category allows low-risk RPA operations in certain circumstances without the need for a ReOC or RePL. This includes commercial operators with RPAs lighter than 2 kilograms and some private landowners and leaseholders operating RPAs up to 25 kilograms. Private landowners and leaseholders operating above 25 kilograms are required to hold a RePL.

From 1 June, RePL applicants will satisfy the training requirements by completing a RePL training course conducted by a person holding a RPA Operator’s Certificate (ReOC) that authorised the training. Applicants can also apply to CASA for a flight test.

CASA will continue to recognise practical training courses completed before 1 June 2017by drone manufacturers or their agents. CASA approved training organisations are located across Australia in regional and metropolitan areas and a list of approved drone operators. including those who can conduct training, can be found on the CASA website. Traditional aviation flying schools can also provide aeronautical knowledge theory training.

Drone manufacturers and their agents who wish to provide practical training for the issue of a RePL from 1 June 2017 must hold a ReOC that authorises the training.

Depending on the training approval each ReOC holder has obtained, they can train in a range of categories (i.e. aeroplane, rotorcraft etc.) related to specific remotely piloted aircraft or drones.

An information package on becoming a certified training provider is available from CASA by emailing RPAS@casa.gov.au. To receive a package by reply email, include “manufacturer training approval” in the subject line.

More information about the advantages of holding a RePL can be found on the Flying drones/remotely piloted aircraft in Australia pages on the CASA website. All inquiries can be emailed to CASA at RPAS@casa.gov.au

SENATE DRONE INQUIRY MEDIA RELEASE 10TH MAY 2017

CASA Briefing Newsletter - April 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CASA Briefing

April 2017

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

The Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester, has issued a new Statement of Expectations to the CASA Board. This is an important document that sets out the strategic directions the Government expects CASA to head in between now and mid-2019. It also sets out how CASA is meant to perform its functions. As a notice provided under the Civil Aviation Act, the Minister’s Statement of Expectations guides the CASA Board’s strategic deliberations and decision making. CASA’s next Corporate Plan will reflect the strategic directions in the Statement. The Minister has made it clear that CASA’s regulatory activity should be pragmatic, practical and proportional. Mr Chester has said a pragmatic, practical and proportional approach to regulatory activity is intended to help support aviation growth, particularly in the general aviation sector. It is important to understand the Statement of Expectations builds on the work CASA has been undertaking in recent years to lift our performance in a range of key areas. These include CASA’s approach to safety regulation, the development of new regulations and stakeholder engagement. The Statement of Expectations also reinforces CASA’s commitment to our Regulatory Philosophy. Of course it should not be forgotten that the Statement of Expectations makes it clear CASA will continue to ensure the highest priority is given to aviation safety.

The Minister also recently announced the appointment of Ms Cheryl Cartwright to the CASA Board. I welcome Cheryl’s appointment as she will add more diversity of experience to the Board and lift the gender balance close to 50 per cent, which is great for our organisation. Cheryl has a background in government relations, strategic planning and communications. This appointment is consistent with CASA’s governing legislation, which stresses the importance of an appropriate balance of professional expertise on the Board to complement the aviation experience of current Board members.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety


Cold and flu drugs could put you at risk

Winter is coming and it’s time for everyone in safety sensitive positions in aviation to think carefully about cold and flu medications. Codeine, which is found in a number of cold and flu treatments, is a drug included in the aviation drug and alcohol testing program. If codeine is detected during testing a person is required to stop work until they are cleared by either a CASA doctor or under the provisions of their company’s Drug and Alcohol Management Plan. Naturally this means disruption to normal work and rosters and for casual workers possibly lost income. To avoid testing positive for codeine people working in aviation sensitive roles, such as pilots, maintainers and cabin and ground crew, should seek advice from their doctor or their company’s drug and alcohol management personnel before taking cold and flu treatments. Over the counter medications can cause side effects which impair the ability to perform to required standards and so put safety at risk. The permitted level of codeine under the drug and alcohol regulations is 25 nanograms per millilitre. In 2015-16 CASA conducted 16,598 random drug and alcohol tests on safety sensitive aviation personnel.

Find out more about drug and alcohol testing.

How to protect low use engines

New advice has been released on how to protect piston aircraft engines that are not flown regularly. These engines are susceptible to damage from corrosion and contamination, which may adversely affect expected service life. In coastal areas and areas of high relative humidity corrosion attack can occur within a few days. Aircraft operators with aircraft that are flown infrequently should follow the instructions of engine manufacturers as well as be aware of a range of key issues. These issues are set out in an airworthiness bulletin which covers the use of preservation oil, establishing an appropriate engine preservation threshold and regime, calendar time oil changes and engine ground running. The need for engine preservation should be evaluated by aircraft operators, taking into account environmental conditions and periods of aircraft inactivity. Changing oil on a calendar time basis for low utilisation engines is an effective means of removing contaminants such as water and the by-products of combustion. Engine ground running is not a substitute for regular flying and will in fact tend to aggravate rather than minimise corrosion. Similarly, the practice of pulling engines through by hand when aircraft are not run or flown for extended periods can also exacerbate problems.

Get all the details on protecting engines.

Cost recovery changes reduce costs

CASA’s cost recovery arrangements are being streamlined and improved. Changes are being made to cost recovery for international and domestic travel, legislative instruments and refunds on fixed fees. The changes will reduce a range of regulatory costs to the aviation community. In line with Australian Government policy CASA is required to recover costs for providing regulatory services. Fees apply to regulatory services such as licences and ratings, examinations, medicals, aircraft registration, certificates, permits, exemptions, approvals and authorities. Fees are charged at hourly rates or as fixed fees starting from $25. The time charged for international travel by CASA to provide regulatory services is being changed to a standard working day rather than an hourly rate. CASA’s satellite offices in Broome, Kununurra, Gove and Horn Island will be treated as fully operating offices for the purposes of cost recovery. This will reduce travel charges for some regulatory services in these areas, benefitting local aviation communities. CASA will also standardise the way in which charges are applied for the drafting and lodging of Federal Registered Legislative Instruments. This will provide greater certainty and consistency and ensure that CASA does not charge more than is required for this work. There will now be partial refunds of fixed fees where a task is not required to be completed and a fee has been paid in advance. Changes to cost recovery will take effect from 1 May 2017.

Find out more about CASA’s cost recovery.

Approved testing officer delegations extended

Existing approved testing officer delegations are being extended for another 12 months - until 30 June 2018. These delegations, which allow approved testing officers to carry out certain flight tests and proficiency checks, were to have expired on 30 June 2017. The extension has been made while the indemnity arrangements that currently cover approved testing officers are comprehensively reviewed. Under changes introduced in the new licensing suite of regulations approved testing officer delegations are being replaced by a flight examiner rating. This change meant current indemnity arrangements, which only cover delegates and authorised persons, ceased once approved testing officers moved across to the flight examiner rating. The 12 month extension of the existing delegations means the indemnity protection offered to all CASA delegates and authorised persons, as set out in Civil Aviation Advisory Publication (CAAP) Admin-1, will apply to people who continue to hold an approved testing officer delegation. Approved testing officers who still have their delegation and have not obtained a flight examiner rating do not need to take any action at this time. A working group comprising CASA, the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development and the Department of Finance has been established to examine all aspects of the indemnity scheme and insurance-related considerations. A policy paper on the issues will be produced for comment during 2017. This will look at whether indemnity arrangements should continue and if indemnity does continue the nature and extent of the coverage.

Find out more about the approved testing officer delegations.

New look for aviation medicine online

The web site that provides information about aviation medicine is changing. The current aviation medicine web site is being integrated into the main CASA web site. This will change the design and layout of the aviation medicine web pages, while all essential information and functionality is retained. The change could affect some bookmarks of individual aviation medicine web pages. As part of the move to the CASA web site all aviation medicine online information has been reviewed to make sure it is up-to-date and easy to find. The search functions for Designated Aviation Medical Examiners and Designated Aviation Ophthalmologists will continue to operate in the same way. The changes will not affect the medical records system or the login procedures. CASA has undertaken user testing of the new aviation medicine web pages to make sure they meet the needs of the aviation community. The new web pages are scheduled to go live in May 2017.

Visit the aviation medicine web pages.

Cabin crew ratio clarified

The federal government has supported the continuation of approvals for a ratio of one cabin crew member to every fifty passenger seats on some domestic aircraft. This follows a parliamentary committee inquiry into cabin crew ratios. In a statement the government said there was unequivocal advice from both CASA and Office of Transport Security that having a one to fifty cabin crew ratio in Australia did not reduce the safety or security of domestic aircraft operations. Most major international safety regulatory authorities around the world endorse the one to fifty ratio. CASA issues individual directions to airlines permitting a one to fifty cabin crew ratio if aircraft have been certificated by the state of design for this ratio. Airlines need to have in place an approved robust safety management system and safety risk management plan to have access to the ratio on specified aircraft. The statement by the government said the Office of Transport Security has confirmed that since the use of the one to fifty cabin crew ratio was permitted on some Australian aircraft in 2006, there has not been a diminution of security standards in Australia.

Read the statement on cabin crew ratios.

Ten seminars for pilots coming soon

CASA is holding ten safety seminars for pilots around the nation during April 2017. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled at Inverell, Innisfail, Jandakot, Armidale, Merimbula, Townsville, Jabiru, Esperance, Alice Springs and Ayers Rock. Eight of these seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft. Two of the seminars – Jandakot and Esperance – will include a refresher on weather forecasts and a summary of accident/incident statistics over recent years. Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate fuel management and partial power loss as the cause of a high number of accidents. Lessons will be learnt from past accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. All the seminars provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book your place for an AvSafety Seminar now.

Seminars for engineers

Two engineering safety seminars are being held in May 2017. An engineering seminar will be held at Caloundra on Wednesday 17 May 2017 and at Alice Springs on Tuesday 23 May 2017. These seminars are aimed at people in airworthiness roles such as engineers, the head of aircraft airworthiness and maintenance, continuing airworthiness management, air operators and training organisations. CASA aims to support the professional development of people in these safety critical roles by providing access to the latest best practice, information and resources. Importantly the seminars will also provide the opportunity to ask questions and raise issues with CASA. Topics to be covered will include the maintenance responsibilities of the registered operator, registration holder, responsible manager, aircraft owner and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer; defect reporting; tool control; and the Part 64 review. Part 64 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations covers the requirements needed for an authorisation to operate an aeronautical radio or the authority to taxi an aeroplane.

Book your place at an engineering seminar.

Hobart airspace study

A study of the airspace around Hobart aerodrome has made three recommendations. The study, conducted by CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation, says the existing airspace classification and architecture should remain unchanged, except for one adjustment to a controlled area step. It is recommended that Airservices Australia continues redesign work for flight routes into and out of Hobart, making improvements to existing terminal instrument flight procedures and introducing standard arrival routes. The report says CASA should monitor aircraft and passenger movements and incidents at Hobart over the next 24 months to determine whether a trend of traffic growth continues. An aeronautical risk review should then be conducted if necessary. There has been a steady growth in traffic movements at Hobart over the last four years. The annual number of airspace related incidents at Hobart has remained low, with seven incidents recorded between December 2009 and June 2016. There were no injuries from any of the incidents. Airspace users reported that on occasions they experienced delays in receiving airways clearances and there were general inefficiencies in the use of airspace. Stakeholder comments highlighted that occasionally the tower frequency experienced congestion and over transmission occurrences.

Go to the full Hobart airspace study report.

For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.