News

AMAS Photo Competition

Congratulations to Brian Cochrane  who is the winner of our photo competition for June.


Brian is now in the running for the $1000 cash prize in December and will have his photo featured on the AMAS inc website home page. https://www.amas.org.au/wspHome.aspx


You must be a financial member for the duration of the competition to be eligible for the $1000 cash grand prize, further information can be found by visiting the above website under "news".

CASA Briefing Newsletter - June 2020 [SEC=OFFICIAL]

From Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

On 6 July 2020, CASA turns 25. I realise not everyone will be rushing to celebrate, but never-the-less this is a time to reflect on where we have come from, the many challenges faced and overcome by the aviation community and the progress we have all made. Being a regulator is challenging but, on balance, I believe that over the last 25 years CASA and its people have got far more right than wrong. Australia’s aviation safety record is arguably one of the best in the world and we have a widely respected aviation safety system. According to the International Civil Aviation Organization we are currently ranked sixth out of member states for an effective national safety system. Of course, CASA is only one part of the national aviation safety system, yet on any reasonable assessment it is an important part. The system works best when the regulator, aviation organisations, people in operational roles such as pilots and engineers, as well as other aviation bodies such as Airservices Australia and the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, all pursue common and complementary safety goals – in other words we work together.

CASA and Airservices Australia were born out of reviews of systemic regulatory issues with their predecessor, the Civil Aviation Authority, in relation to the major aviation tragedies Monarch and Seaview, in which 15 people were fatally injured. The Civil Aviation Authority was split into separate safety regulatory and air navigation functions, which allowed greater specialisation and focus on key areas. Importantly, it lowered the risk of conflicts of interest arising, which is particularly significant for the safety regulator.

Over the last 25 years CASA has strived to get the safety balance right, whether that is protecting fare paying passengers from unacceptable risks or ensuring there are appropriate regulations for general aviation. There can be debates about the finer details of actions we have taken over 25 years, but there can be no doubting our intent has always been to develop and nurture a safety framework that manages risks effectively and in doing so saves lives.

I consider CASA can be particularly proud of its achievements over 25 years in the area of safety education and promotion. Flight Safety Australia has delivered in-depth and insightful stories on every facet of aviation safety, both in magazine and online editions. We have held thousands of safety seminars for pilots and engineers, produced safety resources such as flight guides, information booklets and checklists, and delivered multimedia packages to support campaigns on key issues such as safety management and human factors.

Over the life of CASA there have been a wide range of important initiatives that have reached fruition. These include the introduction of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast for all instrument flight rules operations, the adoption of a risk-based approach to surveillance with priority given to passenger-carrying operations, reforms to the aviation medical system including the establishment of the Basic Class 2 medical, more effective and formalised consultation with the aviation community, establishment of the Industry Complaints Commissioner, setting up the Office of Airspace Regulation, establishing the Flight Training and Testing Office, introducing requirements for safety management systems, establishing drug and alcohol management and testing, running an ageing aircraft campaign, bringing in new fatigue risk management rules and pioneering regulations covering remotely piloted aircraft operations. This is only an extract of the last 25 years and I thank CASA’s staff, past and present, for all their achievements working with the aviation community for safe skies for all.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Updates

Support for COVID-19 recovery

A new resource has been released to support the aviation community during the COVID-19 recovery. A valuable package of safety tips called ‘fit to fly’ is set out in a series of checklists. The check lists cover personal issues for pilots, flight planning, aircraft preparation, aerodrome and airspace issues and maintenance. Information ranges from physical and mental health to issues for aircraft after long periods of inactivity. There is also a package of related maintenance information and links to other useful reading. All pilots will find the fit to fly checklists a practical tool in the current environment. Fit to fly is the latest CASA initiative to support pilots during the COVID-19 crisis. Other initiatives include extending 800 air operator certificates and more than 300 flight training approvals by six months, a six-month extension of medical certificates for more than 30,000 pilots and a package of measures for more than 14,000 aircraft maintenance engineers. There are also relief measures in place for drone operators, aerodromes and air traffic controllers. CASA moved quickly to introduce these measures to ease the burden on the aviation community during the COVID-19 crisis.

Go to the fit to fly check lists.

Find out more about COVID-19 relief measures.

Have your say on Part 121 standards

Consultation is underway on the new manual of standards covering air transport operations in large aeroplanes. The consultation on the manual of standards for Part 121 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations is being run in three tranches. The first, which is open for comment until 16 July 2020, covers five areas. These are carriage of documents and emergency and survival equipment information, operational flight plans, narrow runway width calculations, safety briefings and instructions including safety briefing cards, and weight and balance documents and standard weights. CASA is also asking for comment on a number of proposed modifications to the Part 121 regulations which have become necessary as a result of ongoing discussions with representatives from the aviation community. There will be consultation on the remaining nine chapters of the Part 121 manual of standards later in 2020. Part 121 covers multi-engine aeroplane air transport operations - including passenger, cargo and medical transport operations - with a maximum operational passenger seating capacity of more than nine seats or a maximum take-off weight of more than 8,618 kilograms. Part 121 was made into law in December 2018 as part of the new flight operations suite of Civil Aviation Safety Regulations and takes effect from 2 December 2021.

Have your say on the first tranche of the Part 121 manual of standards.

Update on new maintenance regulations

Work to develop proposed new maintenance rules for the private and aerial work sectors is well advanced. To help everyone get a better understanding of what is coming CASA has provided a new set of questions and answers on the proposed Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. The questions and answers cover aircraft operations, aircraft maintenance, inspection authorisations, licensed aircraft maintenance engineers and pilot maintenance. The information confirms CASA will be producing a plain English guide to Part 43 along the lines of the guide about to be released for the general operating and flight rules in Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. The new maintenance rules for private and aerial work operations will provide increased flexibility as well as reducing administrative costs. The next step in developing Part 43 is releasing the final policy decision summary and a regulation impact statement. Regulatory drafting will follow as soon as the flight operations suite of regulations is completed. CASA has also provided a series of information sheets on continuing airworthiness which cover Parts 43, 42 and 145. Part 42 is about continuing airworthiness management organisations and Part 145 is about approved maintenance organisations.

Go to the Part 43 questions and answers.

Read the continuing airworthiness information sheets.

New path for aerial work chief pilots

A new and more flexible way to become a chief pilot in a range of aerial work operations is now available. CASA can approve chief pilots for some aerial work operations in aeroplanes where the applicant has successfully completed a course run by the Aerial Application Association of Australia. This course replaces the requirements set out in Civil Aviation Order 82.0, which includes oral and performance examinations. The Aerial Application Association chief pilot course includes skill-based prerequisites, study requirements and a three-day face-to-face training workshop. Applicants will work through multiple exercises during the workshop and be assessed for suitability to be a chief pilot. The new aerial work chief pilot pathway is set out in an instrument which also allows CASA to approve other suitable courses. CASA will audit courses to ensure they provide the level of training required to deliver an acceptable level of aviation safety. The new pathway does not prevent anyone applying to CASA directly for a chief pilot assessment using the Civil Aviation Order criteria.

Read the exemption that establishes the new aerial work chief pilot pathway.

Avalon airspace review recommends changes

A review of the airspace around Avalon airport has made five recommendations. CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation looked at airspace in a radius of 15 nautical miles of Avalon, from the surface to 8500 feet. The first recommendation is for Airservices Australia to review the airspace design at Avalon and submit an airspace change proposal within 12 months to remove Class E airspace and replace it with Class D or Class C airspace as appropriate. This is to optimise and enhance the level of air traffic services provided at Avalon. It is also recommended that airspace architecture should align with performance-based navigation criteria, the designated airspace handbook information be reviewed and amendments made to remove inconsistencies with other published aeronautical information. Avalon airspace architecture and air traffic control services were assessed as complex, with varying levels of Class D, Class E and Class G airspace overlaid by Class C. The Avalon airspace classifications are linked to the Avalon air traffic control tower hours of operation. The review says airspace architecture should deliver a less complex structure and reduce confusion or uncertainty by airspace users.

Read the Avalon airspace review.

Promise to support drone innovation

CASA will continue to embrace innovation so it can support the remotely piloted aircraft sector to be competitive and world leading. That was the pledge made by CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, in a wide-ranging speech to a recent Australian Association of Unmanned Systems virtual event. Mr Carmody told the event, which replaced a scheduled conference due to COVID-19 restrictions, that Australia punches above its weight in the remotely piloted aircraft sector. He said this was the result of hard work by people and organisations in the remotely piloted sector, helped by a forward-thinking regulatory approach by CASA. The goal for the sector was the safe and efficient integration of remote aircraft operations into the Australian aviation system. Mr Carmody said CASA will continue to improve processes for managing applications for approvals and look for more efficient ways to deliver safe outcomes. He said there will be further enhancements to regulatory service delivery, with online transactions being streamlined. CASA continues to be active in supporting drone surveillance and assisting where required with counter drone activity. Drone detection equipment is now operating at 29 major airports across Australia.

Listen to Shane Carmody’s remote aircraft presentation.

In brief

  • Improvements to CASA’s online services continue. Individuals who sell their aircraft to another individual can start the transfer of registration using the myCASA portal. The former owner and current registration holder needs to begin the transfer process and requires the aviation reference number of the new owner. Other registration transfers currently still need to be done using forms.
  • Have a say now on CASA’s flagship publication, Flight Safety Australia. A survey is seeking views from everyone - whether they read the print or online editions, or never read Flight Safety Australia at all. The survey will only take about 5-10 minutes to complete. Take the survey now.
  • The popular Visual Flight Rules Guide is now a free downloadable PDF on the VFRG website. This 466-page version includes some minor amendments. The updated print edition is also available from CASA’s online store.
  • The micro-business drug and alcohol management plan exemption has been renewed. This exemption reduces the administrative burden on small organisations employing 10 or less people performing safety-sensitive aviation activities not engaged in or providing services to regular public transport operations. Two other related exemptions that provide relief from drug and alcohol management plan administrative and cost burdens have also been renewed.
  • An exemption has been made to help pilots having difficulty completing their commercial pilot licence and air transport pilot licence examination program due to COVID-19 restrictions.


Social Media

Follow CASA on social media now.

We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and YouTube.

 

CASA Know Your Drone - June Newsletter [SEC=OFFICIAL]

Australians are flying drones in record numbers. More drones in the sky means it's important we all understand the rules that keep us safe.

Excluded category flight notifications – tell us before you fly

If you're flying an RPA that weighs 2 kg or less or you're flying over your own land using a drone that is 25 kg or less, this means you’re flying — or planning to fly — under the excluded category. Operating in this category means you must follow the standard operating conditions, notify us of your intent to fly and keep proper records. You can now submit excluded category notifications via myCASA. If you’ve previously notified us, you do not need to submit a new notification unless that notification has expired, you get a new drone, want to fly a different type of drone or change the weight of your drone (such as adding new equipment or other modifications).

EXCLUDED CATEGORY

Flying for fun in special circumstances

We’ve made it easier for you to apply to operate model aircraft (anything being flown for fun, including drones) in some locations where additional permissions and approvals are required. For example, operating within 5.5 km of a controlled aerodrome, above 120 m, part of a model flying display or flying first person view (FPV). You do not need to hold a remote pilot licence (RePL) or remote operator’s certificate (ReOC) to apply for these permissions or approvals. Visit our website to find out more.

HOW TO APPLY

Ensuring the safety of other aircraft

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) recently reported, the number of manned aircraft experiencing near encounters with a drone increased significantly since 2016. The study uses information over the 10-year period from 2010-2019. Remember, you must not operate your drone in a way that creates a hazard to another aircraft. That means, with some exceptions, you must not fly within 5.5 km of a controlled aerodrome or higher than 120 m. Review the rules and download a CASA-verified safety app to find out where you can and can’t fly your drone.

DRONE SAFTY APPS

Are you flying for business?

If you’re operating a drone or remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) for business or commercial use in the excluded category, your business should have an organisation aviation reference number (ARN). Australian businesses and organisations can now apply for an organisation ARN online via myCASA. It’s quick and easy and means your business will be set up for future online interactions with us. You will require a myCASA account and an individual ARN to apply. Make sure you have your organisation’s ABN handy and you are authorised to apply on its behalf. If you're flying under a ReOC and are the CEO or Chief Remote Pilot, you will already be able to access your ReOC's profile in myCASA when you log in.

APPLY FOR AN ARN

Give us your views

We’re increasing our digital service offering so you can interact with us when and where it’s convenient for you. We regularly undertake research and testing to improve our services and products. Research activities include online tasks, face-to-face sessions, focus groups or phone interviews to discover how you find and use our information and services. If you’d like to participate in future research activities, you can register your interest via our website. Anyone can register, but we particularly want to hear from you if you hold a remote pilot licence (RePL) and use an iOS or Android device.

REGISTER INTEREST
 

AMAS PHOTO COMPETITION

No entries were received for the  photo competition for May.

There is a  $1000 cash prize in December 2020 and photos are  featured on the AMAS inc website home page. https://www.amas.org.au/wspHome.aspx


You must be a financial member for the duration of the competition to be eligible for the $1000 cash grand prize, further information can be found by visiting the above website under “news”.


The theme for June will be  for "Control Line build or Control Line built built during isolation"  and should have a brief description of where it was taken and what equipment was used, so start clicking and good luck to all.




Kind regards,


The team at AMAS Inc

AMAS Membership Renewals

A communique from the AMAS Inc Treasurer.

As previously advised at the recent General Meeting, all AMAS Insurance Policies are current to 11th August 2020

AMAS EARLY MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL for existing members is now open from June 1st2020, before your current membership expires at midnight June 30th.

The AMAS Committee has been advised by our Insurance Broker that due to bushfires, floods, Covid 19 and large claims against many Underwriters,  who are predominantly based in London, that most Public Liability Premiums are set to rise by up to 50% and other policies will also be affected.

Regardless of having had Zero insurance claims since the inception of AMAS, there will be a substantial rise in the cost of our new Public Liability Policy we have arranged, the terms of which are identical with our current policies

By careful fiscal policies, minimal expenses and the fact that all AMAS Committee members are volunteers, AMAS Membership fees have been maintained at the same low level of $44pa for some number of years.

As AMAS Inc is affected by the above, and therefore a substantially increased quoted price for our insurance premium, the Committee has reluctantly been obliged to raise the Membership fees for the 2020/21 season, however, have been able to keep the cost below $49.00 for members.

JUNIOR FEES will remain at the current low cost of $10, maintaining the AMAS aim of supporting and to encourage the entry of Juniors into our hobby.

We trust that members will understand the action we have taken in accordance with the AMAS Constitution. In any case the minor cost increase equates to just 8 cents per week!

The Committee understands that flying has been affected by the current pandemic and trusts that our members have not suffered in any way. With flying restrictions now being lifted gradually and flying activities being resumed over all states, the Committee wishes all a pleasant flying season in the coming months ahead as we head out of the pandemic.

Remember "Safety is no Accident"

John D. Taylor.

 Treasurer, on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee


CASA: Re Model aircraft application information for AMAS members [SEC=OFFICIAL]

Members,

Correspondence received from Mr Mark Lewis, CASA RPAS staff,  and circulated with his permission:

OFFICIAL

 

Good morning Michael,

 

Thank you for the telephone call late yesterday about the recent enquiries your organisation is being asked on model aircraft applications for CASA authorisations.

 

As discussed,

 

Model aircraft authorisations:

 

  • The risk assessment previously used by AMAS for the organisation’s FPV exemption provides a good reference template for your members to base their own risk assessment.  With respects to risk assessments, the intent is to identify the hazards and associated risks/management strategies, tailored for the conditions and location a person wishes to operate. 
  • A safety case is not required for FPV, as the activity is issued under a Civil Aviation Safety Regulation (CASR) approval (It is no longer an exemption post CASA Direction 96/17).
  • Operational Procedures –
    • Need to be supplied with the application - again specific to how the club will conduct the intended operation at their location.  The procedures need to encompass all the operational aspects associated with the activity.  E.g. If visitors are allowed to come to a club to try FPV, there should be procedures how the club intends to conducts such activities.
  • Stakeholder engagement
    • Consent to operator over a neighbour’s property – an important aspect to harmonious flying through the fly neighbourly concepts
    • Important process – as it helps identify possible impacts created by the operation of model aircraft – such as aerodromes, prisons, neighbouring businesses etc
      • These impacts should be included as part of the risk assessment

 

(Please note – the form required a minor bug fix for a tick box not functioning - I hope to have corrected very soon)

 

The form is a fillable PDF and will guide the applicant through the process, step-by-step for the information CASA seeks.  We are also currently in the process of publishing additional guidance material for the form and hope to have this available in the near future.

 

 

Registration for model aircraft

 

  • Recreational registration is still quite some time away, expected to happen during 2022.  There is no additional information available or what exceptions may be in place for recreational operations operating at a model aircraft field.  I am unable to provide further comment on the matter.

 

I hope the above information assists the organisation with the enquiries it is receiving of late.

 

Regards

 

 

Mark Lewis

 

RPAS Inspector

RPAS Branch

National Operations & Standards

CASA \ Aviation Group

Ph: 07 3144 7428 M: 0435 963 446 e: Mark.Lewis@casa.gov.au

180 Ann Street, Brisbane, Qld 4000

GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601

sig pic

   

Drones RPAS information on the CASA website

Subscribe to CASA’s mailing list on RPAS

 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT: 

This email may contain confidential or legally privileged information and may be protected by copyright. It remains the property of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and is meant only for use by the intended recipient. If you have received it in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email and delete all copies, together with any attachments.    

CASA-Know Your Drone - May Newsletter [SEC=OFFICIAL]

Australians are flying drones in record numbers. More drones in the sky means it's important we all understand the rules that keep us safe.

Drone registration and operator accreditation for commercial operations

Mandatory drone registration and operator accreditation for commercial operators will open on 30 September 2020. Registration of remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) will help ensure people fly responsibly. Accreditation will demonstrate excluded category operators have learnt the drone safety rules, also known as the standard operating conditions. Recreational drone registration and operator accreditation is expected to commence in 2022.

REGISTRATION AND ACCREDITATION

If you’re using a drone, or remotely piloted aircraft, for work or business, there are specific rules that apply to you. Flying a drone commercially means flying for any type of hire or reward. This could be as simple as taking photos for a real estate listing that you put up on a website or using the data your drone has collected over a construction site to generate income. If you're flying a drone that weighs 2 kg or less or you're flying over your own land using a drone that is 25 kg or less, this means you’re flying — or planning to fly — under the excluded category. Operating in this category means you must follow the standard operating conditions, notify CASA of your intent to fly and keep proper records about your operations.

EXCLUDED CATEGORY OPERATIONS

No Drone Zone

Port Stephens Council is one of the first local governments to install CASA’s standardised national drone safety signage, partnering with NSW Police, Newcastle Airport and Williamtown RAAF Base; The signage alerts drone operators to ‘no drone zones’ around the Williamtown airport. Organisations can request approval to install the signage and download the artwork via the CASA website.

DRONE SAFETY SIGNAGE

Flying FPV in Australia

Ordinarily, you must always keep your drone within visual line-of-sight. This means always being able to see the drone with your own eyes, rather than through a device, screen or goggles. First Person View (FPV) flying makes use of video piloting equipment where the operator flies the drone using live video from an on-board camera relayed via goggles, screen or a headset – rather than through direct line-of-sight. Visit our website for the dos and don'ts of flying FPV in Australia.

FLYING FPV

New drone safety apps

Last month we announced the release of three new drone safety apps from AirMap Inc, AiRXOS and Avsoft. Have you tried them out yet? Download or access a web-based version today. Remember to follow the drone safety rules and to check your local and state government for any additional rules or regulations that apply in your area before you fly – including any restrictions in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

DRONE SAFETY APPS
 


AMAS Inc Photo Competition Winner


Congratulations to Peter Hancock who is the winner of our photo competition for May.

Peter  is now in the running for the $1000 cash prize in December and will have his photo featured on the AMAS inc website home page. https://www.amas.org.au/wspHome.aspx


You must be a financial member for the duration of the competition to be eligible for the $1000 cash grand prize, further information can be found by visiting the above website under “news”.


The theme for June will be  for "Scratch built electric foam rc model and should have a brief description of where it was taken and what equipment was used, so start clicking and good luck to all.




Kind regards,


The team at AMAS Inc.

COVID19 Update - Easing of Restrictions

Good evening members,

The AMAS Inc is cognisant that members are anxious to get back to the hobby as soon as possible and hopefully return to normal operations.  To date this has not been possible and unfortunately, until such time as Australia manages to beat the scourge of COVID19 currently threatening our community, “Normal” operations may be some way off as yet.

 

As many of you will be aware the COVID19 restrictions in some states across Australia are being incrementally eased, to various levels, and with different requirements, depending upon the location.  These provisions are out of the AMAS Inc control and are the exclusive domain of the relevant health authorities.

 

For your information, the AMAS Inc have provided links to the relevant health authorities in each state as well as the Commonwealth governments COVID19 webpage below.

 

https://www.australia.gov.au/

https://www.nsw.gov.au/covid-19

https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/coronavirus

https://www.qld.gov.au/health/conditions/health-alerts/coronavirus-covid-19

https://www.covid-19.sa.gov.au/

https://www.wa.gov.au/government/covid-19-coronavirus

https://www.dhhs.tas.gov.au/publichealth/communicable_diseases_prevention_unit/infectious_diseases/coronavirus

https://coronavirus.nt.gov.au/

https://www.covid19.act.gov.au/

 

Should members decide to recommence flying activities as individuals or under club arrangements they are reminded that, they are required to comply with the relevant health directives applicable as well as the AMAS Inc membership Terms and Conditions.    

 

Given the penalties involved for non-compliance, or worse consequences if there is increased spread of COVID19, members are strongly encouraged to contact their local health authority if there is any doubt as to their ability to comply or if there is any doubt in relation to the health directives in force.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - April 2020 [SEC=OFFICIAL]

From Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

From the earliest days of the COVID 19 event CASA has been working hard to find ways to ease the regulatory burden on the aviation community without creating unacceptable risks to safety. This can be a challenging path to tread, but I believe we have taken a range of decisions that offer meaningful relief to as many sectors of aviation as possible while making sure we maintain a firm focus on safety. As the COVID situation continues to unfold I can assure everyone we will keep reviewing our support for the aviation community and will view the decisions and actions we take through the prism of the crisis. CASA understands aviation is one of the worst hit sectors of the community and must be sustained to be ready for the recovery we are all working towards

Nothing will make the aviation recovery from the COVID crisis harder than lapses in safety performance or, worse still, a tragic accident. So even though operations are disrupted or curtailed, we must not lose sight of safety. CASA’s staff are still working every day with the same commitment and energy to maintain and improve Australia’s proud aviation safety record. We have staff working remotely and in our offices on all of our core functions, including safety oversight, standards and education. Regulatory service delivery continues to support the needs of pilots, engineers, air traffic controllers and aviation organisations. Importantly, we are using the current situation to look for innovation in the way we work to better support the nation’s aviation safety system in the future.

The package of measures we have put in place to ease the burden on the aviation community is comprehensive. There is support for air operators, flight training organisations, maintenance organisations, aerodrome operators, pilots, engineers, air traffic controllers, sports aviation and the remotely piloted aircraft sector. We have extended all air operator and Part 141 and 142 certificates by six months, transition to the new fatigue rules has been extended by 12 months and a range of three-month exemptions are now in place. Operators have relief from Part 61 proficiency checking and flight reviews, as well as training and checking requirements, up to 30 June 2020. Maintenance organisation certificates have been extended by six months and there is a 12-month extension to aircraft maintenance engineer exams. If you are a pilot or an air traffic controller, you can exercise the privileges of your licence for six months after the expiry of any medical certificate you hold. You do not need to do anything, although any conditions on your medical certificate will continue to apply. If your current flight review or proficiency check expired after 1 March 2020, you can continue to use all the privileges of your licence for a further three months from the expiry. You will need to apply to extend these arrangements beyond three months.

Please find all the details on CASA’s support for the aviation community during the COVID 19 event on our website.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Updates

Don’t forget about basic class 2 medical

Pilots are being reminded to consider if a basic class 2 medical certificate suits their flying. A basic class 2 medical certificate is a streamlined alternative to a full class 2 certificate for private operations. Examinations may be conducted by any medical practitioner who can conduct a motor vehicle driver examination. The medical standard is the same as the Austroads commercial driver standard. If applicants unconditionally meet the standard -except for glasses and hearing aids - they will be issued with a basic class 2 medical certificate. The process for getting a basic class 2 is simple and qualified applicants will not need a medical assessment by CASA. A pilot needs to download, print and complete a medical questionnaire from the CASA medical records system, take this questionnaire to their medical appointment, successfully complete the required tests and medical examinations and log back into the CASA medical records system to finalise the application. A fee of $10 is payable to CASA and the medical certificate is issued online within minutes. If a pilot does not pass the basic class 2 medical assessment, or has a pre-existing medical condition, they can still apply for a class 2 medical certificate which requires an assessment in further detail by a designated aviation medical examiner.

Get more information on the basic class 2 medical.

New visual flight rules guide

The popular visual flight rules guide will soon be available as a free PDF download from the CASA web site. A printed version of the visual flight rules guide will continue to be sold through CASA’s online store and a free web version is also online. The guide is designed primarily for visual flight rules pilots. It is a comprehensive booklet containing detailed safety information, diagrams, charts and maps. The guide is divided into sections covering the rules, licensing, pilot responsibilities, radio procedures, pre-flight planning, operations and emergency procedures. The latest edition of the guide features amendments to various rules and regulations, as well as incorporating feedback received from the aviation community. The print version of the guide costs $34.95.

Order a print copy of the Visual Flight Rules Guide.

Keep up to date with the online versions of the guide.

Training for new aerodrome rules

The first training package to help aerodromes transition to the new Part 139 regulations has been released. Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations and the associated manual of standards comes into effect in August 2020. The training package will assist aerodrome operators to understand and navigate through the new requirements. Over the coming months another three training packages will be released, covering a range of topics such as aerodrome facilities and the obstacle limitation surface, operating and maintaining aerodromes and visual aids. The training can be done online through CASA’s AviationWorx portal. Anyone who wants to get a quick overview of the new aerodrome rules can find clear information on CASA’s web site, including frequently asked questions and answers. To make it easier for aerodrome operators to take advantage of the new Part 139 Aerodrome rules, CASA is now also providing the option to apply some of the rules ahead of their originally scheduled commencement. Aerodrome operators considering updating an existing facility or anyone applying to register or certify a new aerodrome can benefit from the opt in early option.

Go to AviationWorx to find the aerodrome training.

Get a quick overview of Part 139.

Find out about Part 139 opt in early.

Don’t miss out on Flight Safety Australia

The Winter 2020 edition of Flight Safety Australia magazine is coming soon. Anyone who doesn’t already subscribe for a print copy of the magazine should place their order before 5 May 2020 to avoid missing out. As usual the magazine will be packed with great safety reading and information valuable to everyone in aviation. There will be a look at the impacts of the COVID 19 event on aviation safety and a story that asks how old is too old to fly. A subscription to Flight Safety Australia costs $39.92 a year. The magazine can also be read for free on CASA’s web site.

Order your print copy of Flight Safety Australia magazine now.

More time for transition to new ops regs

The start date for the flight operations suite of new regulations is now 2 December 2021. Previously these new regulations were to commence on 25 March 2021. The change is to give CASA and everyone in the aviation community more time to prepare for the new rules. In December 2021 nine sets of new Civil Aviation Safety Regulations will come into effect. Another new operational suite of regulations - Part 149 covering approved self-administering aviation organisations – has already commenced and has a final transition date of 13 July 2022. The new operations suite replaces hundreds of requirements currently in regulations, orders, exemptions, approvals, permissions, instructions and directions. The new rules are based on what activities an organisation or person does. The suite includes Part 91, which contains the general operating and flight rules for all aviation in Australia. The suite also covers air operators, large and small air transport, rotorcraft air transport, aerial work, sport aviation, manned free balloons and parachuting. Some of the more complex requirements in the new regulations will have a delayed commencement date. These include introducing a safety management system or a training and checking system for operators. Critical guidance material and assistance to support the transition to the new regulations will be available well ahead of the commencement. CASA has listened to feedback about how much time is needed for the transition and is committed to ongoing information and education for the aviation community.

Find out more about the new flight operations regulations.

National drone safety campaign

A new national drone safety campaign has already reached millions of Australians. The ‘Know Your Drone’ campaign was launched in March 2020 and features a range of digital advertising targeted at recreational drone flyers. The campaign challenges recreational drone flyers on their knowledge of the safety rules and asks them to take a quiz to test their knowledge. Information is aimed to support a wide range of drone flyers - including different age groups, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds such as Arabic, Vietnamese, Korean, Mandarin and Cantonese. The ‘Know Your Drone’ campaign will run until mid-June 2020. It appears online and across social media channels, as well as catch up TV, podcasts and streaming services. CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, says the aim of the new drone safety campaign is to motivate and educate drone flyers to stay safe. “We know most people who fly drones want to do the right thing and we need to make sure they are aware of the safety rules and know what is required to stay safe when flying,” Mr Carmody says.

See the know your drone ad.

New drone safety apps

Three new CASA-verified drone safety apps are now available for commercial and recreational drone operators to download and use. The apps provide customised location-based information about where drone operators can and can't fly their drones according to aviation safety regulations. Drone operators should also check for any relevant local and state government rules or regulations relating to their location before they fly. Luke Gumley, manager of CASA’s Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems branch, says there are now a total of four verified safety apps available to drone flyers. “Australian drone operators now have greater choice in the apps they can use, with the added benefit of knowing the safety information comes from a trusted and reliable source,” Luke says. “The drone digital platform is a fresh and innovative approach by CASA that facilitates third party app developers to deliver services to drone users as we work toward our shared goal to safely integrate drones into Australian airspace.” The new apps on CASA’s drone digital platform are AirMap, AiRXOS and AvSoft. They join OpenSky, which replaced CASA’s Can I fly there? drone safety app last year.

Find the drone safety apps.

Revised date for drone registration

The Federal Government has deferred the first stage of mandatory drone registration and accreditation until 30 September 2020. Remotely piloted aircraft registration for commercial and excluded category operators was scheduled to commence on 1 April 2020. Recreational drone registration and accreditation is still expected to commence in 2022. All drone flyers that don’t hold a remote licence will need to gain accreditation by watching an online video and successfully answering a short quiz to demonstrate they understand the drone safety rules. The registration and accreditation requirements will apply, with certain exceptions, to all drones operated commercially regardless of weight and drones and model aircraft weighing more than 250 grams operated recreationally.

Find out more about drone registration and accreditation.

Catch up on an AvSafety seminar

CASA’s popular AvSafety seminars are currently on hold due to the COVID 19 restrictions. But there is an easy way to catch up on previous AvSafety seminars for pilots by watching a new video on enhancing pilot skills. The video explains how pilots can improve their radio communications skills around aerodromes and investigates how they can maintain situational awareness in a dynamic and changing environment. Featuring CASA aviation safety advisor Tim Penney, the video is an opportunity for pilots to take time out and stop to think of three key human factors that go a long way to making safer pilots. Tim says: “Especially in the dynamic environments surrounding non-towered aerodromes we take a look at communication, situational awareness and finally a brief look at threat and error management. Barriers to effective communication in the air include such things as high workload, fatigue, the mixing of language and culture and of course the ever-present challenge of managing distraction. We also provide pilots with a series hints and tips to be more effective communicators when we do go flying. We examine what situational awareness is and some of the tell-tale signs that may indicate a loss of situational awareness such as fixation, ambiguity and quite simply a failure to fly the aircraft first. Finally, we have a very brief look at threat and error management, or as we often say, ‘enhanced airmanship’.”

Watch the pilot safety video.


CASA - Know Your Drone April newsletter [SEC=OFFICIAL]

Australians are flying drones in record numbers. More drones in the sky means it's important we all understand the rules that keep us safe.

Assistance for RPAS industry during COVID-19

COVID-19 is expected to continue to disrupt business and operations for some time. We recently announced a suite of measures, including deferring commercial RPA registration and accreditation, to alleviate pressure on commercial RPA operators while ensuring the ongoing safety of aviation in Australia. Visit the CASA website to see the full suite of measures for commercial RPA operation

INDUSTRY ASSISTANCE

New drone safety apps

We're excited to announce the release of two new CASA-verified drone safety apps for Australia, with a third app to be added next week. CASA-verified drone safety apps provide drone operators with an understanding of airspace permissions, advisories, and requirements before they take-off. Australian drone operators now have greater choice in the apps they can use, with the added benefit of knowing the data comes from a trusted and reliable source. Download or access a web-based version today.

DRONE SAFETY APPS

myCASA

We’re making it quicker and easier for you to transact with us online. myCASA is an online portal where you can:

If you have a myCASA account, make sure your contact details are up to date and you’ve linked your individual or organisation ARN to your myCASA account. If you’re logging in to the myCASA portal for the first time, you may need to provide proof of identification if you haven’t already provided this to us.

myCASA

Know Your Drone safety education campaign

Recreational drone flyers told us the biggest barrier to following the drone safety rules was a lack of awareness of the rules. So, we've launched Know Your Drone, a safety education campaign to promote awareness and understanding of the drone safety rules for people who fly for fun. It features a 30-second ad and a series of shorter educational ads that highlight the different drone safety rules. Test your knowledge or view, download and share the campaign resources via your social media or website.

SEE THE CAMPAIGN

Translated drone safety rules

Bonjour. Hola. Hallo. Ciao. Hello. We’ve translated our drone safety rules into 20 different languages, including French, Spanish, German, Italian and more. Several of our Know Your Drone safety education campaign videos are also available in Mandarin, Cantonese, Arabic, Vietnamese and Korean.

TRANSLATED RULES

Notice of a General Meeting. 2-20

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF A GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the Documents tab on the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 2nd May, 2020

at Tascott  NSW.

 

Calling for Notices of motion and agenda items has now expired.


NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and no notices of motion or agenda items were received by the Secretary AMAS Inc via email or conventional mail before noon on  2nd April  2020.

Therefore no Notices of Motion/agenda items will be presented at the General Meeting 2nd May.

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

CASA: Remotely piloted aircraft registration and accreditation - further assistance for industry


On 24 March 2020, CASA announced a suite of measures to alleviate pressure on Australian RPA operators while ensuring the ongoing safety of aviation.

COVID-19 is expected to continue to disrupt business and operations for some time, so we are putting in place further measures to assist the RPAS industry.

Drone registration for commercial operators and excluded category operators was scheduled to commence on 1 April 2020 in line with legislation that was passed in July 2019.

The government has agreed to defer mandatory drone registration and accreditation until 30 September 2020.

Recreational drone registration and accreditation is still expected to commence in 2022.

Subscribe to our mailing list for further updates on drone registration and accreditation.

Regards,

Shane Carmody
Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety

AMAS Photo Comp



Congratulations to Peter Gracie  who is the winner of our photo competition for April.

Peter is now in the running for the $1000 cash prize in December and will have his photo featured on the AMAS inc website home page. https://www.amas.org.au/wspHome.aspx


You must be a financial member for the duration of the competition to be eligible for the $1000 cash grand prize, further information can be found by visiting the above website under "news".


The theme for May will be " Model construction under isolation" and should have a brief description of where it was taken and what equipment was used, so start clicking and good luck to all.




Kind regards,


The team at AMAS Inc.

Corona Virus - 3

Members,

Due to the increasing number of inquiries to the society regarding Covid - 19, find below response sent regarding those inquiries:

The society require members to comply with the society terms and conditions.

Federal and state governments are issuing directives day by day.

One such directive is here:

https://www.pm.gov.au/media/update-coronavirus-measures-24-March-2020

With regards to the above website information, in the table associated in the web page link is "Leisure and Recreation". The society is labelled as 'Social sporting based activity' which then unfortunately provides for no exemption for those activities.

Many and most AMAS Inc individuals/groups and clubs across the country have suspended operations.

Also, the matter of insurance would not be active when in contravention to the above directives.

If you'd like a phone discussion on the matter, let us now and we'll phone you at your convenience.

Notice of a General Meeting. 1-20

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF A GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the Documents tab on the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 2nd May, 2020

at Tascott  NSW.

 

Notices of motion and agenda items are now being called for.



NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS Inc via email or conventional mail before noon on  2nd April  2020. 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 3rd April  2020 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members/clubs requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 17th April.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 23rd April  to members/clubs to  vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS Inc (contact details can be found via the Contacts tab on the website) by noon 30th April.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting 2nd May.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

AMAS Photo Comp



Congratulations to Andrew Giles  from Bundaberg who is the winner of our photo competition for March.

Andrew is now in the running for the $1000 cash prize in December and will have his photo featured on the AMAS inc website home page. https://www.amas.org.au/wspHome.aspx


You must be a financial member for the duration of the competition to be eligible for the $1000 cash grand prize, further information can be found by visiting the above website under "news".


The theme for April will be " Your Glider" and should have a brief description of where it was taken and what equipment was used, so start clicking and good luck to all.




Kind regards,


The team at AMAS Inc.

AMAS Inc Committee Communique

 With a busy year ahead, the committee has hit the ground running with the first item being the Renewal of the AMAS Inc First Person View (FPV) exemption, Instrument number CASA EX37/17. This exemption notice will expire at midnight on 29 February 2020.

 

After the committee contacted CASA RPAS section in early January, RPAS section have advised that since the issue of the current FPV exemption, the process has changed and an approval can be applied for under reg 101.029 CASR 1998 for FPV operations. CASA RPAS section have also supplied a new draft application form for this purpose.

 

However, rather than a collective exemption that currently applies across the society, the new application and assessment process requires additional information over and above that which was required for approval previously. Part of this additional regulatory burden includes the identification of each location where FPV operations are to be conducted and how a site would be assessed as suitable for FPV operations.

 

It is important to note that should members wish to continue to engage (engage in the future) in FPV operations after 29 Feb 2020, then an approval from CASA will be required.

 

To assist members in applying for an approval for their individual site(s) please refer to the below links.

 

A copy of the CASA RPAS section (email) advice can be found here.

A copy of the draft application form can be found here PDF or docx

The AMAS FPV Operations Manual can be found here.

The AMAS FPV Guidance Material can be found here.

The AMAS example Risk Assessment can be found here.

When lodging application please copy in the AMAS Inc committee.


Also,



Reviewed society Terms and Conditions can be found here.


Reviewed and improved flight training assessment forms can be found via the Flight Training page.


For inquiry or questions don't hesitate to contact the AMAS Inc committee.


Kind regards,


The team at AMAS Inc.


CASA Briefing Newsletter - February 2020 [SEC=OFFICIAL]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody comments:

A solution has been found to a somewhat thorny and long-running issue that is important to a group of pilots. The issue is colour vision deficiency and the way CASA manages safety related assessments as part of the medical certification process. Colour vision deficiency affects about 400 Australian pilots and a three-stage testing process has been in place for some time, with a pass at any stage allowing an unrestricted medical to be issued. Where all three tests are failed then a medical certificate can be issued subject to conditions.

Research in recent years has shown relying on diagnostic tests alone may be unnecessarily limiting when considering the impact of colour vision deficiency on aviation safety. Advances in technology, operating techniques and human factors training can now mitigate many of the safety risks of colour vision deficiency. Technology to assist pilots has developed significantly and the impact of colour vision deficiency on aviation safety should take these changes into account. These factors have been recognised overseas, most recently in New Zealand where a new approach to colour vision deficiency came into effect in May 2019, which includes an operational colour vision assessment. This assessment comprises a ground-based assessment and an in-flight assessment which looks at a pilot’s ability to interpret visual information. A separate assessment is done for day flying and for night flying.

We have decided to adopt this approach to colour vision deficiency assessment and in the short term we will recognise the New Zealand operational colour vision assessment as an alternative to Australia’s current third level of testing. Work is already well underway on the development of an Australian operational test for colour vision deficiency by mid-2020. Any Australian pilots who wish to use the New Zealand assessment can do so now, although it will require travel to that country. CASA has carefully examined all relevant safety issues and believes this new approach offers a practical alternative assessment for colour vision deficient pilots. We have listened to the views of pilots and made judgements based on research and evidence.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Updates

Have a say on lower cost ADS-B

An important step to encourage the wider fitting of automatic dependant surveillance -broadcast – ADS-B – equipment in aircraft has been taken by CASA. Consultation is now open on proposals to change the standards and requirements for ADS-B equipment. The proposals would expand the existing standards to permit the use of lower cost ADS-B equipment. This equipment could be used on a voluntary basis in visual flight rules aircraft to enhance situation awareness and improve flight safety. Currently visual flight rules aircraft can only use instrument flight rules certified ADS-B OUT equipment. However, there is equipment which is technically capable of delivering the same transmissions but is not specifically authorised in accordance with a technical standard order - often referred to as 'non-TSOd’ equipment. The proposed new standards would allow this lower cost equipment to be used in visual flight rules aircraft in non-controlled airspace. Earlier consultation on the issue of lower cost ADS-B received a positive response from the aviation community.

Have your say on lower cost ADS-B by 13 March 2020.

Security card changes

CASA will no longer be involved in the issue of aviation security identification cards, known as ASICs. CASA was one of a number of organisations approved to issue ASICs. Other organisations that issue the security cards include airports, third party providers and air operators. All organisations issuing ASICs do so under legislation set by the Commonwealth Department of Home Affairs. CASA had outsourced the processing of ASICs to Aviation ID Australia, which is authorised by Home Affairs to issue the security cards. Pilots who currently have an ASIC issued through CASA have been sent information about the transfer of their records to Aviation ID Australia. Pilots applying for or renewing their ASIC may wish to consider using another of the approved ASIC issuing organisations. CASA will cease being involved in ASICs on 28 February 2020.

Find approved ASIC issuing organisations.

Cessna 210 wing spar inspection directive

Owners and operators of 12 Cessna 210 models must have urgent wing inspections of their aircraft completed. The United States Federal Aviation Authority has issued an airworthiness directive requiring visual and eddy current inspections of the carry-thru wing spar lower cap. Inspections must be carried out within 60 days or 20 hours time in service of 9 March 2020. If wing spars are found to be cracked or damaged, they must be removed from service and repaired or replaced before further flight. The directive, which has been automatically adopted under CASA regulations, will affect 139 Australian aircraft. The Federal Aviation Authority action follows the fatal crash of a Cessna 210 near Mt Isa in May 2019 and 96 reports world-wide to date of wing spar corrosion. A preliminary investigation of the Mt Isa crash found fatigue cracking in the wing spar. The US airworthiness directive says: “The FAA has determined that the large number of corrosion reports and the severity of the corrosion identified on a critical single load path part necessitate issuance of an immediately adopted rule. If the corrosion initiates a fatigue crack or affects the carry-thru spar's ability to support the required structural loads, the airplane may suffer a catastrophic failure.” CASA issued an airworthiness bulletin in July 2019 recommending Cessna 210 wing spar inspections.

Read the Cessna 210 airworthiness directive.

New vertical visibility forecast

The Bureau of Meteorology is providing pilots with additional weather forecast information. New information on vertical visibility will be included in some aviation meteorological products. This will help pilots flying in areas impacted by persistent bushfire smoke. Vertical visibility forecast information will tell pilots how much visibility they have above them and will be used at times when smoke is so thick that clouds cannot be easily seen. When vertical visibility is forecast in lieu of cloud, pilots and operators should treat the vertical visibility height as being equivalent to an overcast layer of cloud. This information should be used when making operational decisions related to planning for an alternate aerodrome and determining whether to depart or continue a flight under the visual flight rules. Information on vertical visibility will be provided in aerodrome forecasts, trend forecasts and critical location forecasts within the graphical area forecasts in lieu of cloud information when smoke is obscuring the sky. Vertical visibility is forecast in the form “VV” followed by the forecast value e.g. a vertical visibility of 1000 feet is communicated as “VV010”.

Find out more about vertical visibility in an aeronautical information circular.

Advisory panel expanded

Two new members have been appointed to CASA’s Aviation Safety Advisory Panel. They are Stuart Aggs, the Chief Operations Officer, Virgin Australia Group, and Mark Thompson, the Technical Training Manager, Aviation Australia. Mr Aggs represents the regular public transport sector and Mr Thompson represents the maintenance and engineering sector. The Aviation Safety Advisory Panel is the primary advisory body through which CASA engages with the aviation community and seeks input on current and future regulations and policies. CASA’s CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody said the membership of the panel has been expanded to widen the available expertise and align it with current areas of focus. “It is important to ensure that the ASAP has a broad sector representation with a variety of experience and expertise from within the industry in order to consider aviation safety related matters and provide me with objective advice.” Mr Carmody said. Since the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel was formed in 2017, it has assisted CASA with developing and reviewing various regulations through its technical working groups.”

Get more information on the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel.

In brief

  • Comment now on the proposed transitional arrangements for Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, which covers aerodromes. These new regulations take effect in August 2020. CASA is working on a smooth transition for aerodrome operators by providing reasonable timelines and avoiding an undue burden on existing aerodrome operators. Comment by 2 March 2020.
  • There has been strong support for a proposed new self-study training and examination pathway that would lead to an aircraft engineers licence. The proposed new pathway would be an alternative to the current requirement to undertake licence category training via a Part 147 maintenance training organisation. It would be similar to the CASA basics examinations/schedule of experience scheme that existed under the previous engineer licensing system. Ninety six out of 129 submissions to consultation on the proposal supported the change.
  • It’s time for air operators to start planning for transition to the new fatigue rules. Most operators must comply with the new rules from 1 July 2020. New resources are available, including an explanation of the various transition options and key steps involved. CASA is hosting information sessions from 10 - 25 March 2020 to assist operators with transition. Come along to an information session to learn about the fatigue rules, what is needed for transition and the process for minor variations and fatigue risk management systems.
  • An exemption has been renewed to enable the holders of a commercial or air transport helicopter pilot licence to apply for a commercial aeroplane pilot licence with 60 hours of pilot-in-command experience instead of 100 hours.
  • A supplementary review of Mildura airspace has looked at changes to operations since a new flying training academy commenced operations. The supplementary review has made six recommendations to enhance awareness and improve operations in non-controlled airspace.
  • A PDF edition of our popular visual flight rules guide will be available in coming months as a free download from the CASA website. This 465-page version will include some minor amendments. The print edition will still be available.

Pilot seminars on now

More than 95 per cent of pilots who take part in an Avsafety seminar say it makes them a safer pilot or changes their safety behaviour. And ninety-eight per cent of participants say they would recommend a seminar to other pilots. These findings mean attending an AvSafety seminar in 2020 should be high on every pilot's to-do list. The theme of the current round of seminars is 'expect the unexpected'. Topics being covered include pre-flight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. Several case studies are examined covering weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making is also covered, including some of the traps in decision making. Participants discuss a case study involving fuel management from the point of view of in-flight decision making. Checklists are covered, including their history, importance and how to use them.

In March 2020 AvSafety seminars will be held at:

  • Broken Hill
  • Deniliquin
  • Swan Hill
  • Gladstone
  • Mildura
  • Forbes
  • Latrobe Valley
  • Temora
  • Sale
  • Burnie
  • Bundaberg
  • Jindabyne
  • Maryborough
  • Launceston
  • Albany
  • Clifton
  • Innisfail.

Book a place now at an Avsafety pilot seminar.

Engineer seminars

Two engineering AvSafety seminars are being held in March 2020. They will be at Redcliffe and Rockhampton. The theme of the seminars for engineers is 'the human component'. Three key topics are being covered - engineering errors and the lessons learnt, the human component of engineering and proposed new general aviation maintenance and continued airworthiness regulations. CASA's experts will use a number of case studies to delve into engineering errors, lessons from mistakes and techniques for avoiding pitfalls. The focus will be on exploring the human component of engineering and the cost factors involved in maintenance errors. Importantly there will also be discussion about the proposed Part 43 general aviation maintenance regulations for private, recreational and air work operations. These seminars are a great opportunity to add to professional development, improve safety knowledge and build better teamwork.

Book now for the Redcliffe and Rockhampton engineer seminars.


Feedback

We appreciate your comments and questions.

Please send feedback to CASA Briefing now.

Social Media

Follow CASA on social media now.

We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and YouTube.

 


IMPORTANT:
This email may contain confidential or legally privileged information and may be protected by copyright. It remains the property of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and is meant only for use by the intended recipient. If you have received it in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email and delete all copies, together with any attachments.

AMAS Inc Photo Competition Winner

Congratulations to Mark Burgess from the Riverland Club (SA) who is the winner of our photo competition for January.

Mark  is now in the running for the $1000 cash prize in December and will have his photo featured on the AMAS inc website home page. https://www.amas.org.au/wspHome.aspx


You must be a financial member for the duration of the competition to be eligible for the $1000 cash grand prize, further information can be found by visiting the above website under “news”.


The theme for March will be for the best photo of drone racing and should have a brief description of where it was taken and what equipment was used, so start clicking and good luck to all.




Kind regards,


The team at AMAS Inc.

The renewal of the AMAS Inc FPV Instrument, EX37/17 [SEC=OFFICIAL]

Members,

Welcome to the new year and your committee hopes that the festive season treated you all well. With a busy year ahead, the committee has hit the ground running with the first item being the Renewal of the AMAS Inc First Person View (FPV) exemption, Instrument number CASA EX37/17. This exemption notice will expire at midnight on 29 February 2020.

 

After the committee contacted CASA RPAS section in early January, RPAS section have advised that since the issue of the current FPV exemption, the process has changed and an approval can be applied for under reg 101.029 CASR 1998 for FPV operations. CASA RPAS section have also supplied a new draft application form for this purpose.

 

However, rather than a collective exemption that currently applies across the society, the new application and assessment process requires additional information over and above that which was required for approval previously. Part of this additional regulatory burden includes the identification of each location where FPV operations are to be conducted and how a site would be assessed as suitable for FPV operations.

 

It is important to note that should members wish to continue to engage (engage in the future) in FPV operations after 29 Feb 2020, then an approval from CASA will be required.

 

To assist members in applying for an approval for their individual site(s) please refer to the below links.

 

A copy of the CASA RPAS section (email) advice can be found here.

A copy of the draft application form can be found here pdf or docx

The AMAS FPV Operations Manual can be found here.

The AMAS FPV Guidance Material can be found here.

The AMAS example Risk Assessment can be found here.


When lodging application please copy in the AMAS Inc committee.


For inquiry or questions don't hesitate to contact the AMAS Inc committee.

 

Kind 

regards,

AMAS Inc Committee.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - January 2020 [SEC=OFFICIAL]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody comments:

Many people have been affected by the recent bushfires and our thoughts go to the families and loved ones of those who have died and to all who have been impacted by these fires. In particular I would like to pay tribute to the three crew of the Lockheed EC130 who were lost in the recent accident in southern NSW.

The serious threats to lives and property posed by bushfires cannot be overstated, especially in the current unprecedented circumstances. There are more than 500 aircraft, provided by over 150 operators, available for firefighting across Australia with many resources arriving to help from overseas. We recognise the vital role that aerial firefighting plays in protecting communities, essential infrastructure and the environment together with supporting firefighters on the ground.

During these emergency situations CASA will do everything possible to facilitate and expedite the issue of regulatory authorisations, approvals, permissions and exemptions necessary for aerial operations in support of efforts to prevent and fight bushfires. CASA understands the importance of such applications and will continue to expedite them in a manner that is consistent with the interests of safety and the requirements of the law. As you would expect, this work is our priority and we thank those who had to wait a little longer for the processing of other applications not related to the firefighting efforts for your understanding. During this fire season CASA has processed a large number of applications related to aerial firefighting to ensure all available resources are available to be utilised, which is a small but important effort in the grand scheme of things.

On a personal note, I've seen firsthand the benefits of such efforts on the NSW South Coast and we all owe a debt of gratitude to those actively protecting our communities and supporting the relief efforts in the face of very difficult conditions.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Updates

Work underway on transition to new regs

December 2019 saw the completion of the final three Civil Aviation Safety Regulations - the last rule sets to be updated, improved and moved across from the old Civil Aviation Regulations. This means a package of Civil Aviation Safety Regulations will commence in 2021. The package is made up of the operational regulations, which includes the general operating and flight rules, air transport rules and aerial work rules, as well as rules covering sport and recreational activities. During 2020 CASA will be finalising manuals of standards, transition arrangements and guidance material, as well as aligning resources to provide support to the aviation community. For Part 91, the general operating and flight rules, the final version of the Plain English Guide will be released. This guide translates the necessary legal language contained in Part 91, and the associated manual of standards, to create an easy to read and use publication. To facilitate a smooth transition to the new rules CASA is committed to providing critical guidance material to the aviation community, as well as training for key CASA staff, a full 12 months before commencement.

Go to the draft of the Part 91 Plain English Guide.

Positive support for weight increase

The aviation community has expressed strong support for an increase in the maximum take-off weight for recreational aircraft. In late 2019 CASA asked for views on the impact of increasing the maximum take-off weight limit from 600 kg up to a maximum of 760 kg for aeroplanes administered by approved self-administering aviation organisations. This would only apply to aircraft used for recreational activities and associated flying training. A total of 408 responses were received from individuals, groups and organisations, with 83 per cent supporting the increase in maximum take-off weight. Eighty per cent of people agreed that the change would be positive for private recreational aviation. A common comment made in the feedback was the proposal would benefit the aviation community as it would stimulate activity in the private recreational aviation sector across the board. Feedback indicated the change would result in improved safety as a result of access to aircraft with greater structural integrity, as well as the ability to carry to greater useful loads and additional fuel. It would likely change the perception of recreational private flying and attract new and former pilots into the sector, creating greater opportunities in training and maintenance. CASA is now drafting amended standards to enact the proposed policy change and will put this out for further consultation.

Read the summary of consultation on the maximum take-off weight.

Updated advice on airworthiness directives

Updated advice is now available on understanding and complying with airworthiness directives. The information is valuable for both aircraft operators, airworthiness organisations and licenced engineers. It sets out the responsibilities for complying with airworthiness directives and recording compliance in the appropriate maintenance records. The latest version has amended background information and an explanation of the CASA approach to harmonisation with state of design requirements. One of CASA's roles is to ensure the airworthiness of Australian-registered aircraft is preserved to at least the standard established at type certification by the regulatory authority of the state of design. This authority is usually in the best position to understand the safety risks associated with deficiencies in an aircraft design or manufacture that have been identified in service. As a result an airworthiness directive issued by the authority of the state of design automatically applies to Australian registered aircraft of the applicable type. CASA typically only deviates from the position taken by the state of design where local contextual circumstances exist, or where CASA has reason to believe the state of design has not addressed an unsafe condition. CASA publishes state of design airworthiness directives on its web-site and a subscription email service is available to keep users up to date. Where urgent airworthiness directives are issued CASA will endeavor to contact all relevant aircraft operators.

Read the airworthiness directive advisory circular.

Comment now on airspace reviews

There's still time to comment on two draft airspace reviews – Avalon and Darwin. The draft Avalon airspace review makes five recommendations, with one being a change of airspace classification to enhance safety. The review report says: "Airservices Australia should review the airspace design and submit to CASA an airspace change proposal to remove the Class E airspace in accordance with the report's findings and to ensure the airspace classification aligns with the appropriate level of air traffic service at Avalon." Other recommendations relate to modernising the airspace design at Avalon, addressing ambiguities between the Designated Airspace Handbook and other aeronautical publications and reviewing published instrument approach and landing procedures. The draft Darwin airspace review also makes five recommendations, the first being for the Royal Australian Air Force to consider a possible redesign of the 30-40 nautical mile control area step at Darwin. The RAAF should consider any opportunities for better efficiencies applied to civilian traffic management, given the increasing number of military aircraft participating in local military exercises, noting the improvements made by RAAF air traffic control over previous years.

Read the Avalon draft airspace review and comment by 3 February 2020.

Go to the Darwin draft airspace review and comment by 3 February 2020.

Drone safety sponsorship open

A special round of CASA sponsorship is now open to support drone safety. Sponsorship could promote the drone safety rules and safe flying behaviours, the adoption and uptake of CASA-verified drone safety apps, the role of CASA in drone safety education and regulation and the distribution of CASA drone safety information products and promotional collateral. Activities could include recreational or industry events, workshops and seminars or educational programs. In most cases the total value of CASA sponsorship provided to an individual or organisation will be $5,000 or less.

CASA is also supporting the roll out of standardised national drone safety signage across Australia. Signs can be erected at places where drones are prohibited – such as within three nautical miles of a controlled aerodrome – or where caution must be taken when flying a drone because additional laws or conditions may prevent a drone flight. This can include populous areas or places such as national parks where local regulations may apply. Signs can be put up by airports as well as local, state/territory and federal governments and authorities. The signs use easily recognisable colours and symbols to make them simple to understand.

Get more information on CASA support for drone warning signs.

Find out about drone safety sponsorship.

Slick magneto bulletin

Advice has been issued following numerous reports of loose impulse coupling rivets in Slick magnetos. A loose or broken rivet in a magneto could potentially enter the gear train of an engine, resulting in damage to the gear train and potential catastrophic engine failure. The issue affects Slick 4200, 4300, 4700, 6200, 6300, 6700 series magnetos with a serial number between 15021147 and 19020180. In addition, any 4200/6200 series impulse coupled magneto which had the impulse coupling changed with an impulse coupling manufactured between February 2015 and February 2019, is affected. The manufacturer Champion Aerospace has issued a service bulletin requiring the replacement of affected magnetos or the installation of a replacement impulse coupling. Inspections are required within either 25 or 100 hours time in service, depending on the installation. Recurring inspections are needed until components are replaced.

Read the Slick magneto service bulletin.

Briefs

  • Work is underway for the transition of aviation organisations and pilots to the new fatigue rules from 1 July 2020. We have established a fatigue panel of specialists that is updating and augmenting guidance material and also preparing roadshows and other information. Find fatigue management resources.
  • Flight crew, air traffic controller and aircraft engineer licence wallets are now available for purchase from CASA's online store. The wallets cost $20.
  • The Autumn Flight Safety Australia magazine will have a tech and data theme, exploring the use of electronic flight bags for planning and navigating. There'll be interviews with experts and tips from experienced pilots. Other stories will cover the difficulty of controlling small helicopters, the prevalence of mental health issues in aviation and opportunities for big data and artificial intelligence to improve safety in air transport. The print edition of Flight Safety Australia costs only $39.92 a year for four editions.
  • An experienced non-executive director with a strong financial and risk management background has been appointed to CASA's Board. Ms Donna Hardman was appointed to the CASA Board from 1 January 2020 for a three-year term by the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Michael McCormack. The appointment replaces former CASA Board member Jane McAloon.

February pilot seminars

More than 95 per cent of pilots who take part in an Avsafety seminar say it makes them a safer pilot or changes their safety behaviour. And ninety-eight per cent of participants say they would recommend a seminar to other pilots. These findings mean attending an AvSafety seminar in 2020 should be high on every pilot's to-do list. The theme of the current round of seminars is 'expect the unexpected'. Topics being covered include pre-flight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. Several case studies are examined covering weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making is also covered, including some of the traps in decision making. Participants discuss a case study involving fuel management from the point of view of in-flight decision making. Checklists are covered, including their history, importance and how to use them.

In February 2020 AvSafety seminars will be held at:

  • Archerfield
  • Shepparton
  • Jindabyne
  • Loxton
  • Caboolture
  • Strathalbyn
  • Maitland
  • Southport
  • Ballina
  • Lismore
  • Adelaide.

Essendon maintenance seminar

Essendon is the location for an engineering AvSafety seminar in February 2020. The theme of the seminar for engineers is 'the human component'. Three key topics are being covered - engineering errors and the lessons learnt, the human component of engineering and proposed new general aviation maintenance and continued airworthiness regulations. CASA's experts will use a number of case studies to delve into engineering errors, lessons from mistakes and techniques for avoiding pitfalls. The focus will be on exploring the human component of engineering and the cost factors involved in maintenance errors. Importantly there will also be discussion about the proposed Part 43 general aviation maintenance regulations for private, recreational and air work operations. This seminar is a great opportunity to add to professional development, improve safety knowledge and build better teamwork. The seminar is being held on Wednesday 12 February 2020 from 15:00 to 17:00 at Aviation Australia, Hanger 104, 300 Lionel Street, Essendon Fields.

Book a place at the Essendon engineering seminar.



Social Media

Follow CASA on social media now.

We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and YouTube.

 


IMPORTANT:
This email may contain confidential or legally privileged information and may be protected by copyright. It remains the property of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and is meant only for use by the intended recipient. If you have received it in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email and delete all copies, together with any attachments.

CASA-Know Your Drone Summer Series [SEC=OFFICIAL]

Australians are flying drones in record numbers. More drones in the sky means it's important we all understand the rules that keep us safe.

Safety signage

Standardised national drone safety signage is being rolled out across Australia by airports and local, state/territory and federal governments and authorities. The signage uses easily recognisable colours and symbols to ensure understanding and consistency, regardless of language or location. Keep your eye out for the signage at an airport or location near you!

DRONE SIGNAGE

myCASA

We’re making it quicker and easier for you to transact with us online. myCASA is an online portal where you can:

  • apply for an individual or organisation aviation reference number (ARN)
  • submit a remote pilot licence (RePL) application
  • view and apply for renewals of remotely piloted aircraft operator's certificates (ReOC)
  • update your contact details.

More online services will be available through myCASA soon.

myCASA

Flight notifications

If you’re flying or intend to fly for or at work, under the excluded category (sub-2 kg or private landholder), you must notify CASA before you fly.

Notifications are specific to each drone, so you'll need to submit a new notification if you:

  • get a new drone
  • want to fly a different drone
  • change the weight of your drone e.g. by adding extra equipment or other modifications.

Make sure your notifications are up to date. It’s quick and easy!

NOTIFY CASA

Going overseas?

If you’re travelling overseas this holiday period and thinking of taking your drone, there’s few things you need to know. Every country has different laws for using drones and some even ban them all together. You could be required to learn new safety rules, get a licence or register your drone in that country before you fly it. And remember, drones use lithium polymer batteries which must be carried in your hand luggage. For more tips about traveling with your drone, visit our website.

TRAVELLERS

Unsafe operations

If you believe you've seen someone breaking the drone safety rules, you can report it to CASA. Fines of up to $1,050 can be issued per offence. If the matter is taken to court, fines of up to $10,500 can be imposed.

REPORT UNSAFE DRONE
 


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IMPORTANT:
This email may contain confidential or legally privileged information and may be protected by copyright. It remains the property of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and is meant only for use by the intended recipient. If you have received it in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email and delete all copies, together with any attachments.

AMAS Inc Photo Competition


Congratulations to Anne Taylor from Brisbane who is the winner of our photo competition for January.

Anne is now in the running for the $1000 cash prize in December and will have her photo featured on the AMAS inc website home page. https://www.amas.org.au/wspHome.aspx


You must be a financial member for the duration of the competition to be eligible for the $1000 cash grand prize, further information can be found by visiting the above website under “news”.


The theme for February will be for the best aerial photo of your flying site and should have a brief description of where it was taken and what equipment was used, so start clicking and good luck to all.




Kind regards,


The team at AMAS Inc.

President's Christmas Message 2019

Christmas comes around fast each year.  I am finding it hard to better my last message.

 It brings back happy memories of family gatherings and charming traditions that have been passed down through the generations.  Christmas carols, gift exchanges and family feasts are just some of the enduring traditions that make the season one of the world's favourite festive occasions.

 Christmas means something different to every person and family.

 New family members and friends have come into our lives.

 If you are alone. Remember the good times, friends and family past. Celebrate them.

 If you know someone who is have difficulty at this time reach out to them.

Invite them for a meal.  Try to make a difference in their lives.

 Make this Christmas special for someone in need. It will automatically become special for you.

The best gifts in life will never be found under a Christmas tree, those gifts are mates, friends, family, children and the ones you love.

My aeromodelling adventure began with a Biggles book in 1962 which I recently found while sorting a bookshelf.  Inspiration always comes from somewhere. Not always where you expect it.

Everyone keeps telling me that books are dead and the next generation is always on their tablet.  

Why not give an E-Book https://free-books.online/ebook/biggles-in-france/

There is a good list of books and information here.  http://biggles-online.com/

Try to pass on the joy which aeromodelling has brought to us.

Safely celebrate this Christmas with friend’s, family and grandkids with toys that fly. 

Enjoy the innocence of Christmas.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruirnUfaC5U

 On behalf of the committee at AMAS Inc I wish a merry Christmas, prosperous and safe New Year to all.

 Phil Poole.

 President, AMAS Inc.

 

The AMAS Inc great photo competition commencing January 2020.


We invite you along with all current financial members to participate in this monthly competition ending in December 2020 with a grand prize of $1000 cash( !!) being paid into the winners bank account soon after the 10th December 2020 when the grand prize winner will be announced.

Each monthly winner will receive an AMAS cap and beanie with a cloth patch valued at over $50 from our online shop and have their photo displayed on our website home page.

https://www.amas.org.au/Shop.aspx?enc=5w%2fMyKsNXJEWgyAVjhtx4g%3d%3d

RULES:

  • You must be registered and financial for the period of the competition with an email address for us to communicate with you and juniors must have their parents permission to publish photos of themselves.

  • Each month will have a different theme and only one photo can be sent, with the winner being announced on the 5th of each month. The theme for January will be “Xmas” so have those cameras ready on Xmas day or at the field Xmas break up, family, friends and fun is what the judges will be looking for.

  • You can enter each month, but only if you have been unsuccessful in previous months during the promotional period and the judges decision will be final.

  • Entries for January close 31st December 2019.


Send all entries to amassecretary@gmail.com with brief comments about where your photo was taken and any other relevant information.


So what are you waiting for, get clicking and send us your best shot.


Happy Xmas and  new year from the team at the  AMAS Inc .


CASA Briefing Newsletter - November 2019 [SEC=OFFICIAL]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody comments:

With 2019 rapidly drawing to a close it’s time to reflect on the achievements of the past 12 months and look ahead to the challenges of the near future. In a recent speech to the Regional Aviation Association of Australia I set out my current five priorities. They cover finalising the remaining civil aviation safety regulations, improving service delivery through digital enhancements, finalising the plain English guide to the new operating rules, the successful transition to new fatigue rules and remotely piloted aircraft systems.

Work on the three remaining civil aviation safety regulations - parachuting, sport and recreational aviation operations and balloons – is progressing well. Manuals of standards to support the package of operating regulations is also well advanced and will be completed next year. Longstanding concerns over the new fatigue rules have been addressed and there is now broad support for this approach. The new fatigue rules commenced on 2 September this year, with transition to be completed during 2020.

In addition we have a number of large initiatives underway to improve the way CASA does business. The first is known as service delivery transformation – best described as our big ‘client facing’ project. The intent is for you to get services from CASA much more quickly and simply than in the past. Significant improvements have already been made and we are working on others such as an on-line digital aircraft registration system and an electronic pilot licensing system. The second is our regulatory services and surveillance transformation initiative. This is our entry control and surveillance project which will see us improve the way we manage a wide range of tasks, utilising a more targeted and streamlined approach. A key outcome of this project will be greatly improved consistency in decision making. We will achieve this by creating one central area, which we are currently calling a guidance centre, through which all questions will come and from which all answers will flow. No longer will we have different interpretations from different inspectors or different regions.

A lot has been achieved during 2019 and with the initiatives we have in train there will be many more runs on the board during the year ahead. As always the goal is maintaining our strong aviation safety record and constantly focusing on the evolving nature of risk. Please read my speech to find out more about our priorities and current issues.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Updates

Service and surveillance improving

CASA is making important changes to the way it delivers regulatory services and surveillance functions for air operators, maintenance organisations, flight training organisations and other aviation organisations. A new operating model is being finalised to make a range of improvements in key areas. The goals are to deliver nationally consistent guidance to the aviation community, ensure the effective and efficient processing of applications and submissions and to better focus CASA surveillance on risk. One of the key features of the proposed new operating model is the segregation of CASA’s guidance, entry control and surveillance functions. By segregating these functions CASA will be able to better manage regulatory and service dealings with aviation organisations. The aim is for CASA to be fairer, quicker and consistent. Underpinning the new operating model will be the provision of centralised entry and exit points for doing business with CASA, national support services to improve consistency and enhanced processes and systems. These changes will represent a new way of working for CASA and will mean some changes for some aviation organisations. To make sure aviation organisations are aware of the coming changes and benefits, CASA will be talking to operators and holding local briefings.

Charter maintenance policy open for comment

Comment now on future requirements for maintenance and continuing airworthiness for the charter sector. A policy proposal is open for feedback until 22 December 2019. Under the new Civil Aviation Safety Regulations charter operations will be part of the air transport category and be covered by Parts 121, 135 or 133 - depending on the aircraft, weight and passenger capacity. Continuing airworthiness requirements need to be adjusted to be compatible with this new regulatory framework and to ensure they are appropriate for each sector of air transport operations. The proposed policy puts forward changes in areas such as continuing airworthiness management, who may carry out maintenance, maintenance performance rules and approved maintenance organisations. In developing the policy CASA has worked to ensure regulatory requirements are proportionate to the risk associated with the relevant operations and has considered the economic and cost impact on individuals, businesses and the community. The proposed changes will supersede the requirements in Parts 4, 4A and 4B of the Civil Aviation Regulations that currently apply to charter aircraft operations. Seven information sessions are being held around the nation during December 2019 to provide details of the proposals and to answer questions.

Have your say on the proposed maintenance and continuing airworthiness policy.

Book a place at an information session now.

Ballina broadcast area

Due to an increase in air traffic at Ballina a new radio broadcast area is being established. All aircraft operating within 10 nautical miles of the Ballina/Byron Gateway aerodrome, from the ground to 8,500 feet above mean sea level, will be required to make radio calls. The change will take effect on 5 December 2019. The broadcast area will enhance communication in the vicinity of Ballina and reduce the incidence of unknown visual flight rules aircraft conflicting with regular public transport aircraft. CASA has received safety occurrence data and formal feedback from operators about aircraft not making recommended radio broadcasts in the vicinity of Ballina/Byron Gateway aerodrome. The use of VHF radio in the broadcast area will now be compulsory. The Common Traffic Advisory Frequency at Ballina, Lismore, Casino and Evans Head remains unchanged at 124.2 MHz. Aeronautical publication charts will be updated as soon as possible. Pilots in the new broadcast area should still keep a look out for other aircraft as some pilots may not yet be aware of the radio requirements.

Brush up on radio procedures in non-controlled airspace.

ADS-B final deadlines loom

Two temporary instruments to allow some aircraft operators longer to fit automatic surveillance dependent-broadcast equipment will expire in 2020. This means anyone relying on these instruments to continue to fly their aircraft under the instrument flight rules needs to act soon. The instruments will not be extended, so any aircraft not fitted with ADS-B will have to fly by visual flight rules only. The two instruments - CASA 114/16 for Australian registered aircraft and CASA 113/16 for foreign registered aircraft - expire at midnight 1 January 2020 and midnight 6 June 2020 respectively. ADS-B transmitting equipment mandates have been progressively implemented in Australia since 2007. The final mandate, requiring all aircraft operating under the instrument flight rules to be equipped with 1090 MHz extended squitter ADS-B, took effect on 2 February 2017. Aircraft in breach of the mandate that are not operating under an exemption may incur a fine for non-compliance.

Find out more about ADS-B.

Civil Aviation Act changed

Amendments to the Civil Aviation Act were passed by Federal Parliament in October 2019 and came into effect November 2019. The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, Michael McCormack, said the amendments will ensure economic and cost impacts on aircraft operators are considered when CASA develops aviation safety standards. Mr McCormack said the changes are designed to support a regulatory environment that continues to maintain safety as the highest priority without unnecessarily restricting innovation and growth. “This amendment is one element of the Liberal and National Government’s support of aviation which also includes the new Regional Airports Program, the Women in Aviation initiative, continuation of the Remote Airstrip Upgrade Program and the increase to the student Higher Education Loan Program loan limit,” Mr McCormack said. “Aviation continues to evolve but remains an essential ingredient to the economic success of this nation, and the Liberal and National Government is committed to ensuring its aviation policies continue to help sustain a strong and viable Australian aviation industry. I also acknowledge the bipartisan support on the amendment by the Labor party and its ongoing support on aviation safety matters.”

Changes to publications

Airservices Australia is no longer providing a number of CASA document services. This affects the Civil Aviation Order amendment service, Civil Aviation Advisory Publication Complete and Civil Aviation Advisory Publication Operational Complete publications and subscriptions services. From mid October 2019, the CAO and CAAP subscription service ceased being available for purchase or renewal. All current CAO and CAAP amendment subscriptions will run until they have expired. From November 2020, the paper-based version of the CAAP Complete, CAAP Operational Complete and amendments will no longer be available for purchase. Airservices, through its agent CanPrint, will continue to sell the CAO complete publication, which will be updated twice per year commencing in 2021. The changes to the way the publications are available has been driven by the fact that many people in the Australian aviation community have moved away from paper-based products and they are now easily accessed electronically. Civil Aviation Orders and Civil Aviation Advisory Publications are available for free from the CASA website.

Find out more about Airservices publications.

Get Civil Aviation Orders and Civil Aviation Advisory Publications for free.

In brief

  • All CASA offices will be shut from 25 December 2019 to 1 January 2020. Normal services will resume on Thursday 2 January 2020. Please get in early if services are needed around the holiday period as applications lodged at the last minute are unlikely to be processed before the shutdown. CASA staff will be on call for urgent aviation safety matters over the Christmas-New Year period – simply call 131 757 and follow the prompts.
  • Give the gift of safety this Christmas. An annual subscription to the Flight Safety Australia magazine print edition is the perfect present for everyone in aviation. Or pick up some back issues in stock now for your holiday reading. Available at the CASA online store.
  • Remember, CASA’s Brisbane office has moved to a new CBD address at 180 Ann Street, Brisbane. Telephone numbers remain the same.
  • New forms are available for operations involving the carriage of firearms or the carriage and discharge of firearms from an aircraft. The forms help to make the firearms application process simpler as they more clearly outline requirements. Guidance material is also provided. Full information on CASA’s website.

Be safer – get to an AvSafety seminar

More than 95 per cent of pilots who take part in an AvSafety seminar consider it makes them a safer pilot or changes their safety behaviour. That means it is important to attend an AvSafety seminar in your area. The theme of the current seminars is ‘expect the unexpected’. Topics covered include pre-flight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. Several case studies are examined covering weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making is also covered, including some of the traps in decision making. Checklists are discussed, with several safety occurrences examined where the correct use of a checklist may have stopped an incident or accident occurring.

In December 2019 AvSafety seminars are being held at:

  • Warnervale
  • Bankstown
  • Bunbury.

Book a place at a pilot safety seminar now.

Horsham engineers seminar

An AvSafety seminar for engineers is being held in Horsham in December 2019. The theme of the seminar is ‘the human component’. Three key topics will be covered - engineering errors and the lessons learnt, the human component of engineering and proposed new general aviation maintenance and continued airworthiness regulations. The focus will be on exploring the human component of engineering and the cost factors involved in maintenance errors. Importantly there will also be discussion about the proposed Part 43 general aviation maintenance regulations for private and air work operations. CASA’s aviation safety advisors welcome discussions and questions. The Horsham seminar is being held on Wednesday 11 December at the Horsham Aero Club.

Book a place now for the Horsham seminar.



Social Media

Follow CASA on social media now.

We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and YouTube.

 

CASA: Guidance for the aerodrome rules [SEC=OFFICIAL]

Members,

The following is being circulated for those members who operate at aerodromes:

Guidance for the aerodrome rules

CASA is progressively releasing guidance to help industry understand the changes to rules for aerodromes.

The first two draft Advisory Circulars (ACs) are now available on CASA's Consultation Hub.

To ensure the guidance information provides practical advice you are invited to review and provide comment on:

  • Draft AC 139.A-03 v1.0 – Application of aerodrome standards
  • Draft AC 139.B-01 v1.0 – Applying for aerodrome certification

The consultations close on 27 November 2019.

An amendment to Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations (CASR) – Aerodromes and the revised Part 139 (Aerodromes) Manual of Standards will come into effect on 22 August 2020.

For further information email aerodromes_regs@casa.gov.au.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - October 2019 [SEC=OFFICIAL] [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody comments:

As most people will know a substantial package of new regulations comes into force from early 2021. The flight operations suite of regulations covers the general operating and flight rules, air transport certification and governance, air transport operations for aeroplanes and rotorcraft and aerial work. The new regulations retain many of the existing requirements, but for some people and organisations changes will need to be made. That means CASA will have a firm focus over the next 12 months on making sure the aviation community is given appropriate support to transition to the new regulations. We are committed to making the rule transition as easy as we can.

CASA will provide extensive guidance material on the new regulations well ahead of their commencement. This will include a mapping tool showing where a rule is in the current regulations compared to where you can find it in the new rules. In the first half of 2020 we will release the new manuals of standards for the flight operations regulatory parts, which will set out in detail what is required for compliance. We will also release sample manuals for aviation organisations to make completing the necessary paperwork an easier job. CASA will hold face-to-face information sessions in metropolitan and regional areas, and we will target information to different aviation sectors.

We will also be making sure there is additional time to comply with the more complex requirements in the new regulations. There will be more time allowed for introducing safety management systems and training and checking systems, as well as fitting terrain awareness and warning equipment to aircraft. CASA will consult with the aviation community on these arrangements through our normal processes.

I am currently writing to aviation organisations to set out in detail information about the transition to the new regulations and the support CASA will be offering. If anyone feels CASA should do more in a particular area please let us know and we will be more than happy to look at potential additional measures. The aim is to make the regulatory transition as light a burden as is possible for everyone.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Updates

More online services

CASA’s online services continue to grow, with businesses and other organisations the latest to benefit. From 28 October 2019, Australian businesses and organisations will be able to apply for a CASA aviation reference number online through the myCASA portal. Using the myCASA portal - which is accessed from the CASA website - will make the process of getting an aviation reference number quicker and easier for companies, statutory authorities, government entities, sole traders, co-operatives and incorporated companies or associations. Individuals have been able to get their aviation reference number online for some time. To apply online businesses must have an ABN and the individual applying on behalf of the business or organisation must have a myCASA account and an individual aviation reference number. Foreign organisations such as businesses or government bodies will still need to complete the manual aviation reference number application form. Aviation reference numbers are used by CASA to identify clients and are needed before any licence, permission or authorisation can be issued.

Find out more about aviation reference numbers for business and organisations.

New Brisbane office

CASA’s Brisbane office is on the move. Staff in Brisbane are relocating to a CBD location - 180 Ann Street. The move to the new offices takes place on Friday 8 November 2019. On that day normal services from the Brisbane office will be disrupted. Brisbane-based staff and services will not be available by telephone or email from 1.30pm on Friday 8 November. Brisbane-based services include the issue of aviation industry authorisations, drone general enquiries, commercial remotely piloted aircraft services and drone complaint services. People needing these services from the Brisbane office during the move will be asked to wait until Monday 11 November 2019, when the new office in Ann Street will be open for business. CASA apologises for any inconvenience. All other CASA offices will be open for normal business.

Class C tower recommended at Hobart

A review of Hobart airspace has recommended the introduction of a Class C tower service supported by Class C terminal airspace. The review, conducted by CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation, said Airservices Australia should submit an airspace change proposal within 12 months. The 2019 airspace review of Hobart said there is an opportunity for Airservices to enhance the level of service provided and the efficiency of controlled airspace. Between February 2017 and February 2019, air transport movements and passenger movements for Hobart and Cambridge aerodromes recorded an average growth of 5.4 per cent and 6.1 per cent respectively. For the 12-month period to February 2019, Hobart passenger movements exceeded 2.7 million. Current passenger movement numbers at Hobart are comparable to locations where Class C air traffic control services are provided in Australia. However, there are higher air transport movements recorded at these other Class C locations compared to Hobart. The review said based on combined aircraft and passenger movements at Hobart and Cambridge compared to other Class D and Class C towered locations in Australia, the number reported incidents is considered low.

Read the Hobart airspace review.

Funding for regional airports

Regional airports can start the process of seeking new funds for safety upgrades. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Michael McCormack said guidelines are now available to give airport owners and operators more information on their eligibility for the $100 million program. “For many regional communities, the local airport provides an essential link to the rest of Australia,” Mr McCormack said. “That’s why we’ve committed $100 million over four years from 2019–20 to 2022–23 to help owners of regional airports right across Australia deliver safer runways, taxiways and other safety upgrades such as new fencing or safety equipment. The Regional Airports Program will make sure regional airports meet the needs of communities and local industry now and into the future.” Round one of the program opens for applications on 24 October 2019 and closes on 12 December 2019.

Find out more about the airport funding.

Magazine boosts safety

Make sure you don’t miss out on the new quarterly print edition of CASA’s Flight Safety Australia magazine. More than 85 per cent of people who read Flight Safety Australia consider it has made them safer in their aviation role. More than 95 per cent say it increases their knowledge and awareness of aviation safety issues. An annual subscription costs only $39.95. The summer edition will feature a ‘cloud spotters’ guide to safety by Kreisha Ballantyne, delving into the various families of clouds, the detailed naming scheme and, most importantly, which ones to avoid during flight. American-based contributor Thomas P. Turner poses a key question for aviators: we’re taught we should use checklists, but do we know why and how to use them?

Subscribe to print version Flight Safety Australia magazine now. It can also be read online for free.

Learn from close calls

Sports aviation has its own unique challenges and risks. And a key to meeting those challenges and avoiding the risks is to learn from other people in sport aviation. To make this job easier CASA has released another sport aviation special publication – Close Calls 2019. This 45-page booklet is full of real-life stories about sport aviation flying, including errors, slips and omissions. This is the fourth close calls sport aviation special and important experiences have been openly shared regardless of possible embarrassment to promote safety. As in previous years there are stories and confessions from high-profile, even renowned, sport aviators. Stories cover gyrocopters, parachuting, gliding, home built aircraft, paragliding and ultralights. There is also a section on radio calls in non-controlled airspace. There is a $15 postage and handling charge for delivery of the booklet.

Order a copy of the Close Calls 2019 sport aviation special now.

Our forms are getting easier

CASA’s forms are getting easier to use. PDF-fillable forms are being redesigned to make them simpler and faster to complete. The aim is also to reduce the number of CASA forms and consolidate where possible. Guidelines for completing forms are being integrated into the forms themselves or provided as website content. Over the coming months, CASA will continue to redesign and publish the most commonly used forms. To make sure you are using the most recent version of a form visit the ‘forms and templates’ page on the CASA website. Forms associated with CASA checklists, manuals or regulatory content are currently not included in the forms upgrade project.

Go to the forms and templates page on the CASA website.

Briefs

  • Round one of CASA’s 2019-20 sponsorship program is open for applications until Friday 22 November 2019. CASA sponsors activities that promote aviation safety for the benefit of the wider aviation community. This can include activities such as conferences, workshops and seminars, safety forums, educational programs, publications and recreational or industry events.
  • Feedback is being sought on two new visual reporting points at Jandakot Airport in Western Australia. The two new reporting points, Oakford and Brick Works, were implemented in May 2019 after an aeronautical review of Perth airspace in 2017. CASA wants to hear from visual flight rules pilots and air traffic controllers to find out if the new reporting points are easy to see, easy to understand on the radio and if they are suitable for their operations. Comment by 1 December 2019.
  • An update of the advisory circular listing approved Part 147 training organisations has been released. This document lists the maintenance training organisations approved to carry out theory and practical aircraft maintenance training.
  • Following a comprehensive review CASA has released an updated version of the Flight Examiner Handbook. This handbook contains the standards, policies and procedures to be used by flight examiners and CASA officers when conducting flight tests.
  • Updated advice on night vision imaging system defects has been released. This new version of an airworthiness bulletin gives more information on equipment failure.
  • A review of the airspace around Brisbane West Wellcamp aerodrome has found it is fit for purpose. CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation will monitor traffic growth at Wellcamp over the next two years, including the integration of flight training operations. Another airspace review may be conducted after flight training begins at Wellcamp.

Seminars make safer pilots

Avsafety seminars make pilots safer. That’s one of the findings from a new survey of pilots who have recently attended a seminar. More than 95 per cent of pilots who took part in an Avsafety seminar consider it made them a safer pilot or changed their safety behaviour. Ninety-eight per cent of participants say they would recommend a seminar to other pilots. The theme of the latest round of seminars is ‘expect the unexpected’. Topics being covered include pre-flight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. Several case studies are examined covering weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making is also covered, including some of the traps in decision making. Participants discuss a case study involving fuel management from the point of view of in-flight decision making. Checklists are covered, including their history, importance and how to use them. Several safety occurrences are reviewed where the correct use of a checklist may have stopped the incident or accident occurring.

In November 2019 AvSafety seminars will be held at:

  • Mackay
  • Parafield
  • Warrnambool
  • Emerald
  • Echuca
  • Nhill
  • Longreach
  • Naracoorte
  • Mount Gambier
  • Geraldton
  • Jandakot
  • Murray Bridge.

Book a place at a pilot safety seminar now.

Seminars for engineers

A new series of engineering AvSafety seminars is now underway. The theme of the seminars for engineers is ‘the human component’. Three key topics are being covered - engineering errors and the lessons learnt, the human component of engineering and proposed new general aviation maintenance and continued airworthiness regulations. CASA’s experts use a number of case studies to delve into engineering errors, lessons from mistakes and techniques for avoiding pitfalls. The focus is on exploring the human component of engineering and the cost factors involved in maintenance errors. Importantly there is also discussion about the proposed Part 43 general aviation maintenance regulations for private and air work operations. CASA’s aviation safety advisors welcome discussions and questions, both during and after the presentations. These seminars are a great opportunity to add to professional development, improve safety knowledge and build better teamwork.

In November 2019 engineering seminars are being held at:

  • Geraldton
  • Jandakot
  • Hobart
  • Launceston
  • Perth.

Book a place now at an engineering seminar.



AMAS Inc Committee Communique


Members,

The AMAS Inc committee advises new members (and reminds existing members) that the AMAS Inc website is a 'Live Document' and as such is subject to change. Committee suggests members frequent the website from time to time regarding changes, for example, but not limited to: the Constitution changes adopted at the last Annual General Meeting.

The AMAS Inc also engages a Facebook page which contains, at times, information from the CASA, News items, Fire bans/restrictions, events/news from other AMAS entities etc.

Kind regards,

The team at AMAS Inc.

AMAS Inc Committee Communique

From the committee:

 The AMAS inc association welcomes Robin Klau to the team as Treasurer replacing Mr John Taylor who will now take a minor position after serving continuously since the inception of the organisation.

Robin brings a wealth of experience to the organisation after having served as secretary, treasurer and president in the MAQ inc. (a member of the MAA), from 2007 – 2013. During this time Robin also served as an MAA councilor attending and taking part in several conferences as well as being involved in strategic planning for the MAA.

Any one wishing to contact Robin can do so via amasshopsales@gmail.com which he also administers.



Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 4-19

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 12th October, 2019

at Tascott NSW.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 28th September, 2019.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.


NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 7th September  2019. 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 8th September  2019 for initial consideration . Refer Annex A (REVISED) 23/9/19.

Any submissions from members/clubs requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd September.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 27th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 10th October.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting 12th October.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.


Annex A:


Notice of Motion 1 REVISED 23/9/19:


I, John D. Taylor being a financial member of the AMAS Inc., hereby move a Motion to revise the AMAS Inc Constitution as per the following:


PROPOSED CONSTITUTION CHANGES AMAS Inc.

7 NEW MEMBERSHIP

ADD A NEW CLAUSE

(d) Membership of the Association AMAS Inc.,(that includes insurance coverage) is not valid until the appropriate fee is paid in full at the time of Registration.

8 MEMBERSHIP FEES

ADD A NEW CLAUSE

(d) The appropriate membership fee MUST be paid at the time of Online Registration In order to complete the transaction and to be entitled to Insurance coverage under the policies held by AMAS Inc.

10 WHEN MEMBERSHIP ENDS

CHANGE CLAUSE

(3)

(c) has membership fees in arrears for more than 30 days

(c)Delete

ALSO

13 REGISTER OF MEMBERS

(2)

ADD CLAUSE

(g) Where another person has completed a membership application for a member /intending member(who is Not a Junior)details of that member’s/intending members postal and residential address MUST be provided to the AMAS Inc., Registrar in order to comply with legislation.

(g) Delete

19 Electing the management committee

(1)

(b)

ADD CLAUSE

(iii) Nominations received after that date shall not be accepted

DELETE CLAUSE

(d) Delete

20 Resignation, removal or vacation of office of management committee member

(3)

ADD CLAUSE

(a)    A committee person who fails to attend more than three meetings without apology/reasonable explanation shall be determined to be unsuitable to remain in that position.

(b)   The remaining members of the committee will appoint a replacement person to that position according to the constitution 21 ( 1)


Signed

John D Taylor
Treasurer OZ 004 Life Member.

 

Notice of Motion 2:

I, John D. Taylor being a financial member of the AMAS Inc., hereby move a Motion to increase the Honorarium of the AMAS Secretary in the 2020/2021 season to $ 7500.00
Reason being, the Secretary provides A very valuable 24/7 service to Society members, and is available most of the time to assist and  to provide valuable advice on all matters relating to operations of the Society. 
In addition to this he looks after the AMAS website/Facebook which is updated on a daily basis.
Furthermore he attends CASA  workshops , briefings, as well as attending to local,  State and Federal legislation matters .
In addition he carries out  pilot training in and around Brisbane area.
In reality this is a small pittance barely commensurate with the hours expended for the benefit of the Society members.

Signed
John D Taylor
Treasurer OZ 004 Life Member.

CASA_Changes to commencement dates of drone registration rules [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

UNCLASSIFIED

Dear RPAS Registration TWG members,

 

At the end of July, we advised you of the making of new mandatory drone registration and accreditation rules. We also noted that the cost of drone registration was yet to be decided and that CASA was intending on consulting on this separately, ahead of the scheme’s introduction.

 

To provide industry with adequate time to participate in the consultation on the fees, we are now taking steps to amend the scheme’s commencement dates. Registration is expected to occur over two phases, with commercial drones to register from mid-2020, and a later date for recreational flyers, which is to be announced.

 

The consultation is expected to be opened late-2019 and we will notify you of this.

 

Best regards,


 


Industry Relations Administrator

ASAP and RAPAC Secretariat

CASA\Stakeholder Engagement Division

 

GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601

 

www.casa.gov.au

 

IMPORTANT:

This email may contain confidential or legally privileged information and may be protected by copyright. It remains the property of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and is meant only for use by the intended recipient. If you have received it in error, please notify the sender immediately by reply email and delete all copies, together with any attachments.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - September 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody comments:

Getting ready for the new general operating and flight rules which start in early 2021 is now a whole lot easier. In an important milestone for aviation safety regulation, CASA has released an advanced draft of the plain English guide to Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. In effect Part 91 sets out the rules of the sky, which means it is essential knowledge for all pilots. What we have done is to carefully translate the necessary legal language contained in Part 91 and the associated manual of standards, as well as including helpful tips, to create an easy to read and use publication. There will be little need for most people in aviation to refer directly to the Part 91 regulations and manual of standards as the guide covers all the content succinctly and accurately in plain language.

I have been firmly behind the development of the plain English guide because it will make the transition to the new suite of operational regulations far easier for everyone. In March 2021, new regulatory parts commence covering air transport in small aeroplanes, large aeroplanes and helicopters, as well as aerial work operations and sport aviation. Between now and commencement, CASA will develop other legal documents to support the regulations, as well as detailed explanatory and guidance material. This will include sample manuals and a gap analysis tool - showing where a rule is in the current legislation compared to where you can find it in the new rules.

The advanced draft of the Part 91 plain English guide is being released now so everyone can familiarise themselves with the resource and provide us with feedback. We are working to issue the final version of the guide in the first half of 2020, when the Part 91 manual of standards is complete. Our goal is to give everyone plenty of time to be across the introduction of the new operational rules before they start. Of course, right now the new rules haven’t commenced, so it is important to keep following the current regulations and requirements.

Please go to the interactive PDF version of the guide and give us your feedback via feedback@casa.gov.au.

I was very pleased to recently present the 2019 Stephen Guerin scholarship to pilot Ashley Pullman. The scholarship was set up to honour the late CASA flying operations inspector Stephen Guerin, who was killed in a 2017 accident in South Australia. CASA contributes $15,000 towards the costs of further professional qualifications for a pilot in South Australia who has already achieved or is well advanced towards a commercial pilot licence. Ashley was chosen from ten applicants due to his commitment to advancing in aviation and already being a safety conscious and respected member of the South Australian flying community. His ambitions are to complete a multi engine class rating and then proceed to multi engine training approval and instrument training approval. I’m sure Ashley has a bright future in aviation and I’m pleased CASA can support his training.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Updates

Comment now on recreational aircraft weight limit

Consultation closes soon on a discussion paper setting out a proposal to increase the weight limit for aeroplanes administered by approved self-administering aviation organisations. CASA is seeking feedback from the aviation community on the impact of increasing the maximum take-off weight limit from 600 kg up to a maximum of 760 kg. This would only apply to aircraft used for recreational activities or flying training and the approved self-administering organisation must demonstrate to CASA a capability of maintaining an acceptable level of aviation safety. Other aircraft limitations such as maximum stall speed would not be changed under this proposal. The proposal would see the establishment of a new operating classification within an approved self-administering organisation safety system to manage the operations of aircraft with the proposed higher maximum take-off weight. CASA is seeking submissions that highlight any perceived pros, cons and effects on aviation safety, as well as potential financial impacts. The provision of relevant data or practical examples is welcomed. Feedback from consultation on the discussion paper will help CASA to decide the next steps, including whether to develop a more detailed policy proposal.

Have your say on the maximum take-off weight increase for aeroplanes managed by an approved self-administering aviation organisation discussion paper before 28 September 2019.

Aerodrome manual of standards released

An updated manual of standards for the aerodrome regulations has been released. The manual of standards for Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations sets out safety standards for a wide range of technical matters relating to the physical construction and maintenance of certified aerodromes. The manual has been updated to reflect changes in the aerodromes sector, technology and best practice. Changes mean Australia enhances its level of compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization standards. This will benefit pilots, as all aerodromes will have more consistent visual aids and operational procedures. The Part 139 manual of standards can be used as a practical manual for aerodrome operators and people involved in constructing, maintaining and operating aerodromes. CASA will also publish a suite of guidance materials to provide practical support on many aerodrome regulatory issues. This guidance will further explain the technical requirements of the manual of standards and will use plain language, models, diagrams and case studies to clarify acceptable means of compliance. It will include sample manuals. There was extensive consultation on the updated Part 139 manual of standards during its drafting. It takes effect immediately on 22 August 2020, with a two-year transition period.

Go to the Part 139 Manual of Standards.

Attention all top end pilots

Pilots flying across the top end should mark Wednesday 9 October 2019 in their calendars now. That’s when CASA will be holding a special seminar about flying in the wet season. This seminar will focus on a fatal 2017 wet season accident near Darwin involving a Cessna 210. It offers a unique opportunity to hear directly from a senior Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigator who will analyse the causal factors behind the crash. Presenters at the seminar will apply a number of planning and decision-making models to the facts surrounding the accident. The wet season seminar is an important opportunity to help pilots flying across northern Australia make better and more rational decisions when managing many of the hazards associated with wet season flying. The seminar is free and being held in Darwin at the Mercure Darwin Airport Resort Hotel from 19:30 on 9 October 2019.

Book your place at the wet season seminar now.

Stay alive – don’t push it!

A new campaign has been launched to reduce the number of weather-related general aviation accidents. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau says 21 people were killed in the last 10 years in accidents where visual flight rules pilots flew into cloud, fog or darkness. The ATSB’s Chief Commissioner Greg Hood says the figures are concerning. He said they show one in ten visual flight rules operations into instrument meteorological conditions resulted in fatal; accidents. “Weather-related general aviation accidents remain one of the ATSB’s most significant causes for concern in aviation safety; the often fatal outcomes of these accidents are all the more tragic because they are avoidable,” Mr Hood says. To remind pilots of the dangers and to highlight how to avoid a weather-related accident the ATSB has launched a new safety promotion campaign titled ‘Don’t push it, don’t go. Know your limits before flight’. The campaign highlights three key messages: the importance of thorough pre-flight planning and having alternate plans; that pressing on where there is the possibility of entering instrument meteorological conditions carries a significant risk of spatial disorientation; and the value of using a ‘personal minimums’ checklist to help manage flight risks. Flying into poor weather without the training and experience to do so can rapidly lead to spatial disorientation when a pilot cannot see the horizon. This then leads to incorrect control inputs and a resultant loss of control of an aircraft.

Learn more about the don’t push it, don’t go campaign.

All the info on wildlife hazards

Everyone with an interest in aviation wildlife hazards should check out the new web site of the Australian Aviation Wildlife Hazard Group. Fresh features include a graphical overview of bird strikes over the past 25 years, statistics on the parts of an aircraft most commonly struck and the altitudes and locations strikes occur. The resources section of the website has been reorganised, with new resources to be added regularly to make it a one-stop-shop for wildlife hazard management information. Bird strikes happen every day and occur most commonly at airports when aircraft are landing or taking off. The majority of strikes happen at low altitudes: 50–60 per cent of bird strikes occur at zero to 50 feet, and 30 per cent between 50–500 feet. Bird strikes worldwide have accounted for 262 human fatalities since 1988 and destroyed 250 aircraft. The Australian Aviation Wildlife Hazard Group is the primary aviation wildlife hazard management reference body in Australia. The group’s membership includes multiple aviation industry stakeholders and organisations, such as airlines, airports, Defence, air traffic control, government agencies, wildlife researchers and service providers.

Go to the wildlife hazard website.

In brief

  • Have your say before 30 September 2019 on proposed new balloon regulations. CASA has issued a draft of Civil Aviation Safety Regulation Part 131 for comment. Part 131 covers hot air balloons, hot air airships, gas balloons and mixed gas/hot air balloons. The proposed rules aim to improve the focus of balloon transport operators on the potential for human and organisational factors to cause accidents.
  • New rules came into effect on 1 September 2019 setting out a clear path for a pilot holding a commercial pilot balloon licence to progress from smaller to bigger balloon envelope sizes. The new rules also amend the qualifications for the chief pilot of a balloon air operator certificate holder.
  • Comment by 27 September on proposals for a new self-study training pathway for aircraft maintenance engineers. The proposed new pathway would be similar to the CASA Basics Examinations/Schedule of Experience scheme that existed under the previous CAR 31 licensing system.
  • Have your say on proposed regulatory changes about managing safety data and information. Proposed changes reflect the latest International Civil Aviation Organization standards. Comment by 22 October 2019.
  • Comment by 30 September 2019 on proposed new rules covering flight operations, training and maintenance for sport and recreational aircraft administered by sports aviation bodies. Part 103 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations will replace and consolidate the various exemptions from regulations that currently apply to private sport and recreation flying. It will mean sport and recreational flying can continue largely unchanged. There are some new requirements relating to defects, data plates and aircraft towing.
  • The new version of CASA’s online learning management system – AviationWorx - has been launched. Users can now log in through myCASA, find and manage courses more easily and view courses on a range of mobile devices.
  • Don’t miss out on the new quarterly print edition of CASA’s Flight Safety Australia magazine. An annual subscription costs $39.95 and is full of valuable safety information and insights. Subscribe by 28 October to get the Summer edition in December. If you missed out on the Spring edition - featuring world champion Red Bull Air Race pilot Matt Hall - it’s now available as a back issue in the online store for $14.95, while stocks last.

Expecting the unexpected

The latest series of AvSafety seminars for pilots has the theme of ‘expect the unexpected’. Topics being covered include preflight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. Several case studies are examined covering weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making is also covered, including some of the traps in decision making. Participants discuss a case study involving fuel management from the point of view of in-flight decision making. Checklists are covered, including their history, importance and how to use them. Several safety occurrences are reviewed where the correct use of a checklist may have stopped the incident or accident occurring.

In October 2019 AvSafety seminars will be held at:

  • Albany
  • Armidale
  • Canberra
  • Clare Valley
  • Coffs Harbour
  • Horn Island
  • Karratha
  • Lilydale
  • Moorabbin
  • Mount Isa
  • Murwillumbah
  • Port Macquarie
  • Port Lincoln
  • Port Hedland
  • Tamworth
  • Tyabb.

Book a place at a pilot safety seminar now.

The human component of engineering

A new series of engineering AvSafety seminars is now underway. The theme of the seminars for engineers is ‘the human component’. Three key topics are being covered - engineering errors and the lessons learnt, the human component of engineering and proposed new general aviation maintenance and continued airworthiness regulations. CASA’s experts use a number of case studies to delve into engineering errors, lessons from mistakes and techniques for avoiding pitfalls. The focus is on exploring the human component of engineering and the cost factors involved in maintenance errors. Importantly there is also discussion about the proposed Part 43 general aviation maintenance regulations for private and air work operations. CASA’s aviation safety advisors welcome discussions and questions, both during and after the presentations. These seminars are a great opportunity to add to professional development, improve safety knowledge and build better teamwork.

In October 2019 engineering seminars are being held at:

  • Archerfield
  • Caloundra
  • Darwin
  • Horn Island
  • Karratha
  • Moorabbin
  • Sunshine Coast.

Book a place now at an engineering seminar.

Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 3-19

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 12th October, 2019

at Tascott NSW.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 28th September, 2019.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.


NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 7th September  2019. 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 8th September  2019 for initial consideration . Refer Annex A (REVISED) 23/9/19.

Any submissions from members/clubs requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd September.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 27th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 10th October.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting 12th October.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.


Annex A:


Notice of Motion 1 REVISED 23/9/19:


I, John D. Taylor being a financial member of the AMAS Inc., hereby move a Motion to revise the AMAS Inc Constitution as per the following:


PROPOSED CONSTITUTION CHANGES AMAS Inc.

7 NEW MEMBERSHIP

ADD A NEW CLAUSE

(d) Membership of the Association AMAS Inc.,(that includes insurance coverage) is not valid until the appropriate fee is paid in full at the time of Registration.

8 MEMBERSHIP FEES

ADD A NEW CLAUSE

(d) The appropriate membership fee MUST be paid at the time of Online Registration In order to complete the transaction and to be entitled to Insurance coverage under the policies held by AMAS Inc.

10 WHEN MEMBERSHIP ENDS

CHANGE CLAUSE

(3)

(c) has membership fees in arrears for more than 30 days

(c)Delete

ALSO

13 REGISTER OF MEMBERS

(2)

ADD CLAUSE

(g) Where another person has completed a membership application for a member /intending member(who is Not a Junior)details of that member’s/intending members postal and residential address MUST be provided to the AMAS Inc., Registrar in order to comply with legislation.

(g) Delete

19 Electing the management committee

(1)

(b)

ADD CLAUSE

(iii) Nominations received after that date shall not be accepted

DELETE CLAUSE

(d) Delete

20 Resignation, removal or vacation of office of management committee member

(3)

ADD CLAUSE

(a)    A committee person who fails to attend more than three meetings without apology/reasonable explanation shall be determined to be unsuitable to remain in that position.

(b)   The remaining members of the committee will appoint a replacement person to that position according to the constitution 21 ( 1)


Signed

John D Taylor
Treasurer OZ 004 Life Member.

 

Notice of Motion 2:

I, John D. Taylor being a financial member of the AMAS Inc., hereby move a Motion to increase the Honorarium of the AMAS Secretary in the 2020/2021 season to $ 7500.00
Reason being, the Secretary provides A very valuable 24/7 service to Society members, and is available most of the time to assist and  to provide valuable advice on all matters relating to operations of the Society. 
In addition to this he looks after the AMAS website/Facebook which is updated on a daily basis.
Furthermore he attends CASA  workshops , briefings, as well as attending to local,  State and Federal legislation matters .
In addition he carries out  pilot training in and around Brisbane area.
In reality this is a small pittance barely commensurate with the hours expended for the benefit of the Society members.

Signed
John D Taylor
Treasurer OZ 004 Life Member.

AMAS Inc - CASA Meeting/Workshop 13th August 2019 - 2

Members,

Continuing from the message sent (August 26th) below,

Links to the video and audio only  recordings of the meeting/workshop can be found here:



Previous message(for new members):

Information, regarding the AMAS Inc - CASA meeting/workshop, held 13th August 2019, is being correlated and administered for circulation to the membership.

Find below, for review, link to:



Stay tuned for further updates, information and outcomes in the coming weeks.

Kind regards,

The Team at AMAS Inc.

Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 2-19

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 12th October, 2019

at Tascott NSW.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 28th September, 2019.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.


NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 7th September  2019. 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 8th September  2019 for initial consideration . Refer Annex A.

Any submissions from members/clubs requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd September.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 27th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 10th October.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting 12th October.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.


Annex A:


Notice of Motion 1:


I, John D. Taylor being a financial member of the AMAS Inc., hereby move a Motion to revise the AMAS Inc Constitution as per the following:


PROPOSED CONSTITUTION CHANGES AMAS Inc.

7 NEW MEMBERSHIP

ADD A NEW CLAUSE

(d) Membership of the Association AMAS Inc.,(that includes insurance coverage) is not valid until the appropriate fee is paid in full at the time of Registration.

8 MEMBERSHIP FEES

ADD A NEW CLAUSE

(d) The appropriate membership fee MUST be paid at the time of Online Registration In order to complete the transaction and to be entitled to Insurance coverage under the policies held by AMAS Inc.

10 WHEN MEMBERSHIP ENDS

CHANGE CLAUSE

(c) has membership fees in arrears for more than 30 days.

13 REGISTER OF MEMBERS

(2)

ADD CLAUSE

(g) Where another person has completed a Membership application on behalf of a member/intending member (who is NOT a Junior), details of that member’s/intending member’s postal or residential address MUST be provided to the AMAS Inc., Registrar in order to comply with legislation.

19 Electing the management committee

(1)

(b)

ADD CLAUSE

(iii) Nominations received after that date shall not be accepted

DELETE CLAUSE

(d) Delete

20 Resignation, removal or vacation of office of management committee member

(3)

ADD CLAUSE

(a)    A committee person who fails to attend morethan three meetings without apology/reasonable explanation shall be determined to be unsuitable to remain in that position.

(b)   The remaining members of the committee will appoint a replacement person to that position according to the constitution 21 ( 1)


Signed

John D Taylor
Treasurer OZ 004 Life Member.

 

Notice of Motion 2:

I, John D. Taylor being a financial member of the AMAS Inc., hereby move a Motion to increase the Honorarium of the AMAS Secretary in the 2020/2021 season to $ 7500.00
Reason being, the Secretary provides A very valuable 24/7 service to Society members, and is available most of the time to assist and  to provide valuable advice on all matters relating to operations of the Society. 
In addition to this he looks after the AMAS website/Facebook which is updated on a daily basis.
Furthermore he attends CASA  workshops , briefings, as well as attending to local,  State and Federal legislation matters .
In addition he carries out  pilot training in and around Brisbane area.
In reality this is a small pittance barely commensurate with the hours expended for the benefit of the Society members.

Signed
John D Taylor
Treasurer OZ 004 Life Member.

Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 1-19

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 12th October, 2019

at Tascott NSW.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 28th September, 2019.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.


NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 7th September  2019. 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 8th September  2019 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members/clubs requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd September.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 27th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 10th October.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting 12th October.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - August 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Graeme Crawford comments:

Another important milestone in regulatory development has been reached with the finalisation of new fatigue rules for operators and pilots. The rules in Civil Aviation Order 48.1 Instrument 2019 are the result of the output from the review requested by the CASA Board which was conducted by an independent panel of experts. There was extensive consultation utilising the now well proven combination of an industry/CASA technical working group, the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and public consultation. These fatigue rules align Australia with international standards, address known risks to improve aviation safety and provide flexibility.

The new fatigue rules will commence on 2 September 2019, and there will be a staged transition to give air operators adequate time to move across to the requirements. High capacity regular public transport operators are required to provide plans to CASA by 30 November 2019; however, smaller operators have more time to adopt the new rules. By 1 October 2020 all air operators will be expected to be compliant with the new fatigue rules. The new requirements permit operations under a series of prescriptive rules designed for different types of operations. Where operators require additional flexibility, they can apply for a Fatigue Risk Management System that relates to individual routes or their whole operation. CASA will also consider minor variations to the prescriptive rules where fatigue risks are adequately identified, mitigated and monitored.

CASA will be providing plenty of support to everyone who needs to make the transition, including a new version of Civil Aviation Advisory Publication 48-01. Consultation on the draft of this publication is now open and I invite everyone with an interest to comment. CASA intends to conduct regular fatigue surveys to assess the effectiveness of the new rules in reducing fatigue risk. We will also continue to monitor fatigue as part of our ongoing safety obligations to oversight air operators.

Find out more about the new fatigue rules.

Comment on draft Civil Aviation Safety Publication 48-01 v3.0.

Regards
Graeme Crawford

Updates

Online training on the improve

A new version of CASA’s online learning management system – AviationWorx – is about to be launched. AviationWorx is used by a range of people to undertake mandatory and voluntary training. This includes flight examiners, pilots, engineers, designated aviation medical examiners, ground handlers and refuellers. The system is being updated to make it easier for users to log in, find the courses they’re looking for and manage their training. Anyone who is part way through an AviationWorx online module or training course is encouraged to finish it before the current system is shut down on 28 August 2019. Any unfinished work in modules or courses will be lost after that date due to the migration to the new system. All registered AviationWorx users will be emailed instructions on how to log in to the new system, as well as being given updated guidance material on using the system. Information will also be available on CASA’s website when new system goes live. Current achievements in AviationWorx will be moved across to the new system.

Go to AviationWorx.

Comment now on dangerous goods proposals

Consultation is open on proposed changes to the rules covering dangerous goods. The proposals stem from a review of Part 92 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, which sets the minimum safety requirements for the consignment and carriage of dangerous goods by air. Part 92 covers training, documentation, record keeping and incident reporting, as well as provisions for packaging, marking, labelling, loading and stowage in aircraft. The proposed changes have been examined by a technical working group of the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel. A range of issues are addressed by the proposed amendments, which will improve and update the dangerous goods regulations, including making them easier to understand and comply with. There is a proposed new subpart on the reporting of dangerous goods accidents, incidents and occurrences to give certainty and clarity to operators and to align with International Civil Aviation Organization reporting requirements. Provision is made for aviation infringement notices to be issued for certain offences to allow for more proportionate penalty options. Currently if CASA determines action is appropriate for a breach of the dangerous goods rules a prosecution must be sought. Changes are proposed to the dangerous goods training requirements and there are options for smaller commercial operators to conduct their own case-by-case risk assessments for certain dangerous goods without seeking CASA permission. This removes red tape.

Have your say on the proposed dangerous goods changes by 5 September 2019.

We’ve got drone safety answers

Getting the right answers to questions about drone safety is now a lot easier. CASA’s dedicated drone website – www.droneflyer.gov.au – and the drone pages on the main CASA web site now have a new virtual assistant to answer questions. The assistant appears in the bottom right hand corner of the screen, badged ‘chat with CASA’. It answers general drone questions in real time and in plain English. In the first weeks of operation common questions posed have been about flying drones near airports, the CASA approved app, altitudes, restricted airspace and licences. The virtual assistant learns from each interaction to improve the information and responses. CASA has also refreshed droneflyer.gov.au and CASA web site drone pages, including updated information on the planned national registration and accreditation scheme. The web pages are branded with the theme ‘know your drone’. This theme will be used in future drone information campaigns, with the aim of better engaging with all drone operators. The know your drone brand was developed following extensive market research and testing with current and intending drone users.

Go to droneflyer.gov.au.

Get our magazine in print now

The first new print edition of CASA’s Flight Safety Australia magazine will be out soon. Anyone who ran out of time to subscribe for the Spring 2019 edition can subscribe now for the Summer edition. Each issue of Flight Safety Australia is packed with feature articles and news, historical crash analysis, accident reports, close calls, quizzes and a new, high impact ‘crash comic’. The print edition costs $39.95 a year - less than $10.00 per issue, or under 80 cents a week. Flight Safety Australia content can still be read online for free.

Subscribe now for the print edition of Flight Safety Australia.

No to Illawarra danger area

A proposal to create a danger area in airspace around a planned open cycle gas turbine power plant near the Illawarra Regional Aerodrome has not been supported by CASA. The proposal for an airspace change to mitigate the risks of a plume rise from the power station was carefully examined by CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation. This included formal consultation with airspace users, operational advice from qualified pilots, a detailed safety analysis using subject matter experts and a hazard identification workshop. It was determined the danger area may reduce the potential risk to aircraft from the impact of the proposed plume rise but the required location of the plume and associated danger area would generate additional risks that could not be mitigated. The location and proximity of the proposed danger area would adversely impact aircraft operations in and around Illawarra Airport, with the resulting risks to aviation unacceptable.

In brief

  • Pilots are being surveyed on the resources they need to support pre-flight navigational planning around controlled airspace. The survey asks pilots about their previous use of the tool OnTrack and other resources they use in planning flights. General comments and suggestions can be made about pre-flight planning information and resources. CASA has withdrawn OnTrack as it contained out of date information. Have your say on pre-flight planning support before 30 September 2019.
  • Remember there is a new drone safety app which is a must have for all drone flyers. The OpenSky app will help all drone operators to easily identify where they can safely and lawfully fly across Australia. The old Can I Fly There? app has been retired. Get the new OpenSky app in app stores or online.
  • Flight Safety Australia wants to hear about your close calls—and pays $500 if yours is published. Close calls can be from any sector of aviation, from paragliders to airline transport, including all types of rotary wing aircraft. And close calls are not just about pilots. Contributions are welcome from aircraft maintainers, ground handlers and cabin crew. Share a close call by visiting the Flight Safety Australia website.

Learn to expect the unexpected

The latest series of AvSafety seminars for pilots has the theme of ‘expect the unexpected’. Topics being covered include preflight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. The pilot pre-flight personal minimums tool known as PAVE will be discussed. PAVE stands for: Pilot, Aircraft, Environment and External Pressures. Several case studies will be examined that involve issues including weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making will be covered, including some of the traps in decision making. A decision-making model will be looked at known as PILOT. This stands for Pool the facts, Identify the problem, Look for solutions, Operate, Take Stock. Participants will discuss a case study involving fuel management from the point of view of in-flight decision making. The section on checklists will cover their history, importance and how to use them. Several safety occurrences will be reviewed where the correct use of a checklist may have stopped the incident or accident occurring.

In September 2019 AvSafety seminars will be held at:

  • Aldinga
  • Atherton
  • Cairns
  • Darwin
  • Gold Coast
  • Jacobs Well
  • Katherine
  • Maryborough
  • Rockhampton
  • Redcliffe
  • William Creek.

Book a place at a pilot safety seminar now.

The human component of engineering

A new series of engineering AvSafety seminars is now underway. The theme of the seminars for engineers is ‘the human component’. Three key topics will be covered - engineering errors and the lessons learnt, the human component of engineering and proposed new general aviation maintenance and continued airworthiness regulations. CASA’s experts will use a number of case studies to delve into engineering errors, lessons from mistakes and techniques for avoiding pitfalls. The focus will be on exploring the human component of engineering and the cost factors involved in maintenance errors. Importantly there will also be discussion about the proposed Part 43 general aviation maintenance regulations for private and air work operations. CASA’s aviation safety advisors will welcome discussions and questions, both during and after the presentations. These seminars are a great opportunity to add to professional development, improve safety knowledge and build better teamwork.

In September 2019 engineering seminars are being held at:

  • Adelaide
  • Cairns
  • Mackay
  • Parafield
  • Victoria River Downs.


  

AMAS Inc - CASA Meeting/Workshop 13th August 2019 ongoing matters

Information, regarding the AMAS Inc - CASA meeting/workshop, held 13th August 2019, is being correlated and administered for circulation to the membership.

Find below, for review, link to:



Stay tuned for further updates, information and outcomes in the coming weeks.

AMAS Inc - CASA Brisbane Workshop

The AMAS Inc hosted an event in Brisbane on the 13th August 2019 to engage directly with the CASA and to promote a collegiate approach to matters of interest and concern to the AMAS Incon the RPA Accreditation and Registration changes, including;

    • Compliance with regulatory requirements
    • Minimising additional red tape/processes and impact on AMAS membership
    • Provide clear and concise information, exchange of ideas and develop appropriate solutions to matters of concern.

Mr Andrew Ward, (Manager, Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems - Policy and Regulation) from the CASA provided a presentation on RPA Accreditation and Registration followed by an extended Q&A session to address questions asked by members on a range of issues.

AMAS Inc attendees included a great cross section of the society including;

·         control line and free flight, park flyers, rotary wing,

·         multirotor,free flight, fixed wing

·         independent clubs andindividuals.

Stay tuned for further information on the outcomes of the workshop in the coming weeks.

Drone registration and accreditation rules [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

UNCLASSIFIED

Dear RPAS Registration TWG Members,

 

We passed a significant milestone this week with the making of new mandatory drone registration and accreditation rules.

 

As was discussed at your last TWG meeting, the new rules will come into effect later this year and will occur over two phases, with commercial drones required to be registered from November and recreational drones from March 2020. Please note that the cost of drone registration is yet to be decided and CASA intends to consult on this separately, ahead of the scheme’s introduction.

 

We would like to thank you for your time and efforts. Reaching this milestone would not have been possible without your collaboration and contribution at your TWG meetings, and the feedback you provided to the ASAP.

 

For further information on the new rules, please visit the CASA Droneflyer website.

 

Best regards,

Matt

 

Matthew Di Toro

Industry Relations Administrator

ASAP and RAPAC Secretariat

CASA\Stakeholder Engagement Division

p: 02 6217 1457

 

GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601

 

www.casa.gov.au

cid:image001.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0cid:image002.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0cid:image003.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0cid:image004.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0

 


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CASA Briefing Newsletter - July 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety

I am pleased to announce CASA’s flagship aviation safety publication Flight Safety Australia will soon be available as a quarterly print magazine as well as in the online edition. Since the Flight Safety Australia online edition came into place in 2012, CASA has continued to provide high quality aviation safety information and news. We recently conducted an industry survey which showed 95 per cent of readers say Flight Safety Australia increased their knowledge and awareness of aviation safety issues while 85 per cent said it influenced them to become safer in their aviation role. Almost 90 per cent of current readers surveyed said they would recommend it to other people in the aviation community. These are great results, but we wanted to be sure everyone had the opportunity to have access to Flight Safety Australia. So after the popularity of the annual print edition and the continued interest in a more frequent print magazine, we are reintroducing a regular printed edition.

Flight Safety Australia magazine will be available quarterly in print from September 2019. There will be an annual subscription fee of $39.95 for four issues delivered in a 12-month period, which includes GST and postage and handling within Australia. This fee recovers some of the costs of printing the magazine. Of course, we will continue to provide free online content at the Flight Safety Australia website, which will be updated regularly with unique digital only content, including news, safety videos, audio close calls and more.

If you would like Flight Safety Australia in print place an order through the CASA online store. Please subscribe by 25 August to receive the Spring 2019 issue.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Other CASA announcements

Cessna wing spar alert

A recent fatal Cessna accident in Australia has triggered an alert for inspections of wing carry through spars. The alert covers all Cessna 210 and Cessna 177 models with cantilevered wings. Cantilevered wings do not have struts. The fatal accident was in an Australian registered Cessna T210M aircraft and may have been caused by a fatigue fracture of the spar, where cracking had initiated from a corrosion pit on the lower surface of the wing carry-through spar. The spar failed inboard of the right-hand wing attachment lugs. An accident investigation by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau is underway and a preliminary report shows that the spar had experienced very minor surface corrosion pitting, with no other mechanical damage found at the fracture surface. A review of defect reports and industry feedback regarding corrosion to carry-through spars fitted to Cessna 210 G through M models show that the design is prone to moisture ingress at the upper wing skin joint. Cessna advises 177 models have the same design and potential for similar corrosion on the carry-through structure. Both early and later Cessna 210 and 177 models can also experience moisture ingress from the wing root rib panel cut-outs located adjacent to the carry-through spar wing attachment lugs. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA makes a number of recommendations in relation to Cessna 177 and 210 aircraft, based on the current available information. The recommendations apply to around 330 Australian registered aircraft.

Read the Cessna wing spar airworthiness bulletin now.

GA8 suspension lifted

A temporary suspension of GippsAero GA8 aircraft operations has been lifted by CASA. The temporary suspension was put in place as a safety precaution following a recent fatal parachuting accident in Sweden. The precautionary suspension was triggered by initial information from the investigation into the Swedish accident which showed the accident aircraft had broken up in flight. New information from the investigation indicates there is no evidence of a potential unsafe condition associated with the aircraft. CASA will continue to monitor the investigation into the Swedish GA8 accident and will take appropriate action if any related safety issues arise. A CASA airworthiness inspector has been observing the investigation. Sixty-three GA8 aircraft in Australia were grounded, as well as a number operating overseas. The suspension was in effect for five days and ended at midnight on 25 July 2019. A safety assurance review of Australian parachute operations will also be conducted over coming months. The parachuting accident happened on 14 July 2019 near Umeå in northern Sweden. None of the nine people on board the aircraft survived the accident.

Government sets safety expectations

The Federal Government has released a new set of expectations for the nation’s aviation agencies. Statements of expectations were issued to Airservices Australia, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority with effect from 15 July 2019, maintaining safety as the absolute number one aviation priority. The statements formalise the Government’s expectations concerning the operation and performance of these bodies, with a view to keeping Australian air transport amongst the safest and most reliable in the world. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Michael McCormack said the Government was proud of a safety record that places Australia in the top six of International Civil Aviation Organization member states. “The Government’s statements of expectations for the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, Airservices Australia and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority focus firmly on charging these globally respected agencies with maintaining the nation’s enviable safety record,” Mr McCormack said. The release of the statements follows the reintroduction to Parliament of proposed changes to the Civil Aviation Act 1988 that seek to take into account the cost impact of regulation, while maintaining the primacy of safety. “The Federal Liberal and Nationals Government is very conscious of the challenges faced by small business around the country and the need to remove unnecessary costs and regulatory burden,” Mr McCormack said. “It is important we continue to support an aviation industry that is safe, dynamic and sustainable, with a regulatory system that is responsive and proportionate to risks. The CASA statement of expectations reflects this balance.”

New advice on fuel rules

Online advice on the aviation fuel rules has been updated as a result of feedback from the aviation community. The updated advisory material clarifies the requirements for inflight fuel checking and recording, including information on when it may not be required. The rules have not changed and still require pilots to effectively manage their fuel to ensure that they have sufficient to land with reserves. Two publications have been updated - Civil Aviation Advisory Publications 234-1 and 215-1. Civil Aviation Advisory Publication 234 provides general advice on operations manuals and 215 offers guidance on developing an operations manual. There are three annexes to publication 234, covering sample fuel calculations for single engine piston, multi-engine turboprop and multi-engine turbojet aeroplanes. The information is worth reviewing even when an operations manual is not being developed as it helps explain the fuel requirements. CASA also has online information on the fuel rules for private pilots operating under the visual flight rules.

Find out more about the fuel rules.

Have a say on preflight resources

CASA is asking for feedback from pilots on resources to support preflight navigational planning around controlled airspace. A short survey has now opened to gather information on the past use of the OnTrack website, which was a safety education resource released by CASA in 2010. It assisted pilots to plan flight routes and operate safely in and around controlled airspace at 13 aerodromes around Australia. OnTrack is now no longer available as navigation information published on the website is not up to date with the latest aeronautical charts. The survey asks pilots about their use of OnTrack, how informative videos on the site were and other tools they use in planning flights. There is a general comments field for suggestions about preflight planning information and resources.

Have your say on preflight planning support before 30 September 2019.

New drone app released

The first drone safety app based on CASA’s new digital drone platform has been released into app stores. The OpenSky app helps drone operators to easily identify where they can safely and lawfully fly across Australia. OpenSky provides tailored information for recreational drone flyers, as well as drone operators with a certificate issued by CASA and commercial excluded operators. There are links to relevant safety rules for each category of operations. Users can report unsafe drone flights using a link to CASA’s web form. Controlled airspace is shown in red for recreational and excluded users, while airspace around uncontrolled aerodromes and landing areas is shown in orange. A checklist provides essential operating information for the location selected by the user.

Find OpenSky on the drone safety platform.

Find flight training easily

Currently there are more than 250 flight training organisations across Australia. But finding the right training organisation in the right location may not always be easy. To help, CASA now has a new flight training organisation database on its web site. The database can easily be searched using key words or viewed in total. It displays the trading name and type of approval for organisations that have agreed for the information to be published, which means it may not be a complete list of all authorised flight training organisations. The list also includes details of organisations that may only provide flight training for their employees. Information displayed about each organisation includes their location and the type of CASA certificate or approval held.

Go to the flight training database now.

Updated human factors kit

An updated edition of the safety behaviours and human factors resource kit for pilots has been released. This is an excellent teaching resource for the aviation industry and is now available online or in print. The kit includes 10 booklets, a workbook with practical exercises and videos. The updated edition has new videos which can be ordered on a USB or watched online. The videos contain interviews with industry experts and practitioners like Richard de Crespigny, the Qantas pilot of QF32, Matt Hall, former RAAF pilot and current Red Bull racing pilot, and Louise Kirkwood, the manager Human Factors at Qantas. The kit focuses on key elements of human factors including safety culture, human performance, communication, teamwork, decision making and more. It also includes new topics like the rapid growth of automation and satellite-based navigation. For training schools, the second edition is an acceptable means of compliance, which means CASA recognises the modules within the kit as a resource for developing human factors internal training.

The kit can be used online or ordered from the CASA online store.

ARN process gets quicker, simpler

Changes to the proof of identity requirements for the issue of aviation reference numbers have been made. The changes will speed up the process for issuing reference numbers, allowing most to be issued automatically through the myCASA portal. The existing 100 point identification requirements have been removed and applicants can now use either an Australian passport, Australian birth certificate, Australian citizenship certificate, foreign passport or ImmiCard. Applicants using a foreign passport will need to be in Australia at the time they lodge their application, unless they are a permanent resident. Otherwise they will need to provide a certified copy of their passport which will be manually processed by CASA. If an applicant does not have one of the relevant documents they will need to complete an aviation reference number application form for manual processing, which requires certified copies of 100 points of identification. Applications by form take at least five days to process.

Find out more about the aviation reference number changes.

Briefs

  • The new regulations covering sport and recreational aviation have now commenced, with a three year transition period. Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations has introduced a broad and flexible regulatory framework for sport and recreational organisations, replacing a range of regulatory exemptions that had been used for many decades. Sport and recreational aviation organisations can now transition to Part 149, with several well advanced in preparations.
  • The latest edition of the aircraft engineer careers guide is now available in hard copy. The careers guide provides helpful tips on how to become an aircraft engineer, how to get a licence and where to go for the appropriate training. The hard copy of the guide is available from the CASA online store.
  • A summary of consultation has been published for the new rule sets for larger aeroplane air transport operations - Parts 119 and 121 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. The proposed new regulations consolidate the rules into a single document suite and make them more operationally focused and easier to use.

All new topics for pilots

A new set of topics feature in the latest series of Avsafety seminars for pilots, which has a theme of ‘expect the unexpected’. Topics being covered are preflight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. The pilot pre-flight personal minimums tool known as PAVE will be discussed. PAVE stands for: Pilot, Aircraft, Environment and External Pressures. These are all areas to carefully review before taking off. Several case studies will be examined that involved issues including weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making will be covered, including some of the traps in decision making. A decision-making model will be looked at known as PILOT. This stands for Pool the facts, Identify the problem, Look for solutions, Operate, Take Stock. Participants will discuss a case study involving fuel management from the point of view of in-flight decision making. The section on checklists will cover their history, importance and how to use them. Several safety occurrences will be reviewed where the correct use of a checklist may have stopped the incident or accident occurring.

In August 2019 Avsafety seminars will be held at:

  • Ayr
  • Wollongong
  • Camden
  • Maryborough (Victoria)
  • Ballarat
  • Wilpena Pound
  • Port Augusta
  • Caloundra
  • Bendigo
  • Mittagong
  • St George
  • Cunnamulla
  • Charleville

Book a place at a pilot safety seminar now.

CASA: Sport and recreational rules milestone - Part 149 commences [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Sport and recreational rules milestone - Part 149 commences

The regulation of sport and recreational aviation passed an important milestone on 14 July – with the commencement of the first aviation regulation specifically designed for the sector.

Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR) introduces a broad and flexible regulatory framework for sport and recreational organisations who administer certain aviation activities.

Sport and recreational aviation self-administration has existed in Australia operating under a range of regulatory exemptions, going back, in some cases for more than 60 years.

For the first time, the regulations now recognise those organisations who administer sport and recreational aviation and approved organisations will be issued with a Part 149 Approved Self-Administering Organisation (ASAO) Certificate from CASA.

CASA will begin assessing transition applications for Part 149 Certificates in the coming weeks, with two organisations advising they are nearing completion of their exposition.

For further information:

Any questions: sport@casa.gov.au.

  

CASA June 2019 regulatory wrap-up [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Announcements

Locating a flight training organisation made easy

Need flight training and don’t know where to go? We’ve made locating a flight training organisation easier with the release of a new a database to assist in your search. The database provides a list of CASA approved flight training organisations including their location and the expiry of their certification. View the database on the CASA website.

Consultations

Preliminary Airspace Reviews for Darwin, Broome and Karratha

We conduct regular reviews of Australian-administered airspace. In June we asked for feedback on airspace in the vicinity of Darwinas well as Broome and Karratha via our Consultation Hub. Both consultations are now closed, and CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation is currently reviewing the feedback.

Summary of consultation on proposed rules for larger aeroplane air transport

We have published the summary of consultation for the proposed amendments to the rules for larger aeroplanes air transport operations (Part 119 and 121 of CASR) on our Consultation Hub.

Summary of consultation for synthetic training devices

The summary of consultation to update the Part 60 MOS to directly reference the latest ICAO, FAA and EASA standards for synthetic training devices (flight simulators) is now available. See the Consultation Hub for more detail.

Guidance material

Updated advice on inflight fuel management

We have updated advice on the aviation fuel rules following feedback from the aviation community. It provides clearer advice on requirements for inflight fuel checking and recording. Read the new extracts from Civil Aviation Advisory Publication (CAAP) 234-1(2.1) and CAAP 215-1(3.1) Annex B Appendix B9 on the CASA website.

Exemptions

Changes to flight tests for certain pilot type ratings

An exemption (CASA EX41/19) that allows applicants for pilot type ratings – Swearingen SA226/227 and Embraer EMB120 types of aircraft – to complete part of their flight training and take a flight test in an aircraft, rather than a flight simulator, is available on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

 



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CASA Briefing Newsletter - June 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety

Effective and meaningful consultation is central to the way CASA operates. We are a safety regulator that seeks the views of the aviation community on important issues, as well as safety and regulatory changes. There are a range of mechanisms used to collect, manage and analyse feedback, including the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel. This Panel provides me with informed and objective high-level advice on current, emerging and potential issues and the way CASA performs its functions. It is the primary advisory body through which CASA directs its engagement with the aviation community and seeks input on current and future regulatory and associated policy approaches. The membership of the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel is made up of representatives of the aviation community and two people from CASA. Professor Pat Murray, of the University of Southern Queensland, is the independent Chair of the Panel.

The Panel has been operating successfully for two years, providing advice on developing and reviewing many regulations and policies. These include drone registration, fatigue rules, dangerous goods requirements, airworthiness regulations and the six flight operations regulations. I have now made changes to the composition of the Panel to refresh the expertise of the membership, align it with current areas of focus and stagger the engagement date of members to ensure continuity of the Panel. Three people attended their final meeting on 20 June 2019 – Rob Sharp of Virgin Australia, Caroline Wilkie of the Australian Airports Association and Greg Russell of the TAAAF. All three have been integral in the success of the Panel by providing me with high level and objective advice from their many years of valuable experience in the aviation industry. I thank them for their service. Three new members have joined the Panel, bringing a wealth of experience in flight training, helicopter operations and unmanned aircraft. The new members are - Adrianne Fleming – a founder of Tristar Aviation in Moorabbin which provides flight training and charter services; Captain Ray Cronin, founder and managing director of Kestrel Aviation and current president of the Australian Helicopter Industry Association; and Dr Reece Clothier, president of the Australian Association for Unmanned Systems and Global Airspace Integration senior manager Boeing NeXt.

Three current members of the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel continue to serve - John Gissing, Jim Davis and Michael Monck – as well as CASA’s two representatives, Graeme Crawford and Rob Walker. Pat Murray remains chair. I am sure the refreshed Panel will continue its good work, delivering constructive and practical advice as we further improve Australia’s aviation safety system.

Find out more about the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel.

Best wishes

Shane Carmody

Other CASA announcements

Incipient spin warning

CASA has issued a reminder that aircraft used for training, flight reviews and testing purposes must be certified for the manoeuvres being performed. Conducting an incipient spin in an aeroplane that is not approved for spinning compromises the certified safety margins for the airframe and the ability to recover from the manoeuvre. The reminder comes after the release of the final report of an Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation into a 2017 accident involving an instructor and student conducting a training flight in a Diamond Aircraft Industries DA40, from Archerfield Airport, in Queensland. The aircraft entered a developed spin during manoeuvres consistent with advanced stall recovery training, which likely included intentional incipient spins. The spin continued until the aircraft collided with terrain. The instructor and student were fatally injured and the aircraft was destroyed. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has issued a safety message about incipient spin. “Although the reasons for the accident could not be fully established, the investigation identified varying interpretations of an ‘incipient spin’,” the safety message says. “Operators and pilots should clarify with manufacturers the extent to which the early stages of a spin are permissible and ensure that aircraft are always operated in accordance with limitations. Furthermore, operators should have procedures, and instructors should take all steps, to ensure that they maintain the necessary skills to avoid unintentional spins and recover from both incipient and developed spins.” CASA is developing further guidance material about conducting incipient spins and advanced stalls, as well as how to meet the flight training and testing standards in the Part 61 manual of standards.

Read the report into the Diamond accident.

Ask CASA questions regarding the guidance material in development by email: flighttesting@casa.gov.au

New study good news for pilot health

A new study has found Australian commercial pilots appear not to be at a higher risk of developing invasive melanoma. The findings from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute research were based on the medical records of 20,000 pilots. They are a significant change from decades of older research in the northern hemisphere, which showed much higher risks of melanoma in European and North American pilots. QIMR Berghofer researcher and lead author, Associate Professor Catherine Olsen, said this study looked at de-identified medical records from 2011 to 2016 held by CASA. “This is the first study to examine melanoma incidence in Australian registered commercial pilots,” Associate Professor Olsen said. “Australian pilots didn’t have more melanomas on the head, neck or arms, which would have been expected if sun exposure in the cockpit was a driving factor.” Earlier studies were based on evidence from pilots operating in the northern hemisphere, mostly collected from the1940s up to the early 2000s. Associate Professor Olsen said the new Australian study findings were important to allay concerns about melanoma risk that have been worrying many in the aviation industry. “Today’s pilots work in different conditions and may have different lifestyles. In the 1950s pilots may have had longer layovers, often in sunny locations, and they likely had much higher recreational sun exposure, but now current practices don’t really allow that, they fly more often. Conditions in airliners have also changed. Levels of short-wave solar ultraviolet radiation, the kind associated with melanoma, are mostly extremely low on today’s airliner flight decks.”

Find out more about the Melanoma study.

Urban aerial ride sharing challenge

CASA is gearing up to tackle a new challenge – the safety regulation of urban aerial ride sharing. Uber has announced Melbourne will be the first location outside the United States for aerial ride sharing trials in new electrically powered, vertical take-off aircraft. Test flights are due to start in the United States from 2020 and there are plans for commercial operations to commence from 2023. Uber says the aircraft will be much quieter than similarly sized helicopters and fixed wing aircraft, with every rotor having its own electric motor. Uber is in partnership with a number of experienced aircraft manufacturers to develop the new aircraft, including a subsidiary of Boeing, Pipistrel, Embraer and Bell. The aircraft will operate between hubs in the city, to be known as ‘skyports’. Uber's regional manager for Australia and New Zealand, Jodie Auster, said Melbourne was selected after an 18-month process because of its population, climate and economic viability. "Melbourne's congestion levels are on par with New York," she said. "This and the fact that the population is expected to double to more than eight million people by 2050 made Melbourne a viable test city." CASA has held a number of meetings with Uber to set out the relevant safety and regulatory requirements. CASA has a strong track record in working with innovative aviation technology, having in 2019 created a world-first by approving a commercial drone delivery system in Canberra.

Find out more about Uber’s plans.

New safety support for drones

CASA is taking action to provide even better support for the safe operation of drones. A new drone information platform is being set up as the foundation of a fresh approach to safety for unmanned operations. The digital platform will create opportunities for innovation in the delivery of drone safety information, including the creation of apps to better meet the diverse needs of drone flyers. The new platform will be open to app developers so they can build safety focused tools for recreational and commercial drone flyers. It provides access to standardised safety information and communication tools for app developers who meet CASA’s approval requirements. In the future the new platform will integrate with CASA’s proposed drone registration system and will streamline the process for licensed operators to request access to airspace near controlled aerodromes. This is a further step towards the safe and efficient integration of drones into the Australian airspace system. CASA’s branch head Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, Luke Gumley, says the rapid growth in the drone sector had created a need for more tailored and innovative safety information solutions. “Drone flyers need clear and consistent information about where they can operate their drones,” Luke says. “The first new app is expected to be approved for connection to the platform in early July 2019. We will regularly update a list on our web site of the apps approved to use the platform.” There have been about 250,000 downloads of the current Can I Fly There? App, which has been available for two years. This app will not continue to be supported by CASA.

Keep up to date with drone safety and safety apps.

Tips for getting SARTIME right

CASA has published tips for managing search and rescue times. This is because in 2018, over 30 per cent of inadvertent search and rescue incidents were caused by a failure to cancel SARTIMEs and a failure to report arrivals. Tips include:

  • amend SARTIME during a flight if you think your arrival might be delayed
  • if you change aircraft, or have cancelled or replanned a flight at the last moment, check if your SARTIME is still active
  • a good way to remember to cancel your SARTIME is to set a reminder on your mobile phone - set the reminder to alert you five minutes before your SARTIME is set to expire
  • another way to remember to cancel your SARTIME/SARWATCH is to add it to your post-flight checks
  • if there is no phone reception at your destination cancel your SARTIME on high frequency radio on arrival. If your aircraft is not equipped with a high frequency radio you may contact sector and request them to cancel your SARTIME. This may need to be done in the air as VHF coverage may be limited on the ground.

Find out more about managing SARTIME.

In brief:

  • The new Part 139 regulations covering aerodromes and associated revised Manual of Standards will commence on 22 August 2020. The new manual of standards will be available in mid-2019. There will be a transition period of up to two years for registered aerodromes. Certified aerodromes are expected to largely be compliant with the new manual of standards. CASA has a new mailbox to answer any questions about transition and timings for aerodromes. Email aerodromes_regs@casa.gov.au.
  • New information is available for operators and maintainers of de Havilland Moth aircraft. This covers maintenance, servicing, inspections, repairs or modifications using a de Havilland technical news sheet. CASA is also encouraging Moth operators and maintainers to report defects and findings using the CASA defect reporting system so technical information can be updated. The information is in the airworthiness bulletin AWB 51-009 Issue 1 - De Havilland Moth - Inspection of Wooden Structures.

New seminars for pilots

A fresh series of Avsafety seminars for pilots starts from July 2019. New topics to be covered during the seminars are preflight planning, aeronautical decision making and checklists. The pilot pre-flight personal minimums tool known as PAVE will be discussed. PAVE stands for: Pilot, Aircraft, Environment and External Pressures. These are all areas to carefully review before taking off. Several case studies will be examined that involved issues including weather, fuel, weight and balance and airspace infringements. The importance of in-flight decision making will be covered, including some of the traps in decision making. A decision-making model will be looked at known as PILOT. This stands for Pool the facts, Identify the problem, Look for solutions, Operate, Take Stock. Participants will discuss a case study involving fuel management from the point of view of in-flight decision making. The section on checklists will cover their history, importance and how to use them. Several safety occurrences will be reviewed where the correct use of a checklist may have stopped the incident or accident occurring.

In July 2019 Avsafety seminars will be held at:

  • Griffith
  • Gatton
  • Toowoomba
  • Wagga
  • Maitland – Yorke Peninsula
  • Wangaratta
  • Sunshine Coast
  • Albury
  • Merimbula
  • Moruya
  • Taree
  • Devonport
  • Goondiwindi
  • Gawler
  • Moree
  • Hobart
  • Esperance
  • Parkes
  • Cowra

Book a place at a pilot safety seminar now.

Engineering seminar

CASA is holding an engineering safety seminar at Albury on Wednesday 10 July 2019. The seminar will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. Engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and maintenance training personnel will all benefit from attending the seminar. This is a great professional development opportunity, allowing people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions.

CASA: Coming soon: A new way to take your drone to the next level [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

‘Can I fly there?’ drone safety app retirement and a new way to take your drone to the next level

We’re changing the way we provide you with information about where you can legally operate your drone in Australia. This will see the retirement of our ‘Can I fly there?’ drone safety app in the coming weeks.

We understand that drone flyers need clear and consistent information about where they can operate their drone, and to allow app developers to innovate to keep pace with technological change. So, we’re replacing the ‘Can I fly there?’ app with a new digital platform. App developers can apply to connect to the platform which helps facilitate access to standardised safety information.

To connect to the platform, app developers will need to go through a robust approval and onboarding process that enables CASA to ensure the proposed app delivers accurate information and meets minimum technical requirements. We will regularly update the list of the apps approved to use our platform on our website at www.casa.gov.au/droneapp. The digital platform is being built now, and will be available to app developers in the coming months.

Requirements for apps that connect to the platform include showing airspace and emergency data as well as information on powerlines and national parks. It will also help developers integrate with CASA’s future proposed drone registration system, allow licenced operators to submit flight authorisation requests, automate approvals to operate within 3 NM of a controlled aerodrome (where safe to do so), and will provide the building blocks for a future RPA traffic management system.

The development of the platform is another first step in helping us to integrate drones into Australian airspace safely and efficiently.

You can continue to use the Can I fly there? app in the interim. It will then be removed from the app store after a transition period.

 

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AMAS Inc UPDATE / RENEWAL INFORMATION 2019-2020

The AMAS Inc Committee hope that the past year has treated you well and that you had many happy landings. AMAS Inc continues to grow with members in every state and territory and we hope that you'll continue to renew with the society and enjoy the relaxed fun community that makes up this society.

 

As many of you may be aware, the CASA is formally working with the society regarding exemptions with RPAS registration and accreditation.  AMAS Inc works  with the regulator and the society also engages with other federal,state and local government entities.


 Member fees.

*Early membership renewal is open for the 2019/2020 financial year covering the period July 1st 2019 until June 30th 2020 offering all the benefits that AMAS membership provides members, clubs, groups and other entities. 


The fees are as follows (and are again reduced!):

 

12    Month Membership $44 Senior and $10 Juniors!


Renewals can be registered here:


https://www.amas.org.au/wspMemberRegisterJoin-Renew.aspx

       

    (If the above link fails to connect, copy and paste in your preferred web browser)



The Future.

 

Our hobby is about family, friends and having fun. The hobby of aeromodelling , as applied to the AMAS Inc, has expanded and includes drone operations in various types! Also, with the addition of recreational drone operations, model boats, including yachts and model cars are now included within the insurance cover provided by the society! We will continue to provide insurance and other benefits at an affordable price without compromising service to you our valued member  whilst reaffirming our commitment to promoting the family and friends aspect of the hobby.

  

Now is a great time to join up potential members, especially juniors!

.

The AMAS Committee hope the junior 12 month 'flat' fee will encourage the younger generation to embrace the joys of aeromodelling in the coming years. .

 

Some of you expressed an interest in joining/working with the AMAS Inc committee and we look forward to hearing from you. Simply phone or email the secretary for more information. You do not need any experience and we'd like people from all walks of life from across Australia to participate. 


So what are you waiting for ...  Get involved today!

 

Finally we would remind all members and clubs to check out (review) our website(as it is a 'Live' document) for any changes  that have occurred.


Remember: "Get up and fly"!  and "Safety is no accident".


 

On behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.


*Membership with the society includes, but not limited to, insurance cover.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - May 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety

I am reasonably confident that if you ask anyone in CASA to describe my leadership style the answer will be something like “he likes to set goals and make sure they are met”. Under my leadership if CASA says a project will be completed within a certain time frame to agreed outcomes, the odds are very good that it will be completed. Of course, circumstances can change and plans sometimes need to be altered for sound reasons, but I have to be convinced by facts and evidence before I will approve slippages. Sometimes though events and factors outside the control of CASA can influence outcomes. I am committed to demonstrating that CASA can and will meet deadlines and deliver quality outcomes. In 2018 we had a deadline to complete the six new operational regulatory parts and a deadline for Part 142/142 transition and we delivered on both. Given CASA’s record in regulatory development in the past, these were major achievements. My next regulatory development goal is to complete the remaining parts before the end of this year and work is well underway.

In the area of service delivery, I get regular and detailed reports on how CASA is performing. These reports show how our client services centre is running – the number of applications lodged, the number closed and other details on licences, medicals and permissions. While the number of open jobs at any one time is still higher than we would like, the trend line of applications that have been processed on time is heading in the right direction. I am also focussed on other key areas such as consistency and making compliance with requirements easier and clearer. A major project is underway which is looking at regulatory services and surveillance, with the goal of improving consistency and standardisation across CASA, across offices and across teams through the development of a new operating model. Already there have been improvements made to our key manuals and further improvements will be rolled out progressively over this year and next.

The aviation community can be confident that I will continue to strive for the best possible regulatory and service outcomes for the aviation community. Under my leadership we will not stand still, and we will meet our commitments.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Other CASA announcements

Non-controlled airspace course online

Pilots wanting to learn about radio procedures in non-controlled airspace can now use a CASA online course. The eLearning course covers the background of radio procedures in non-controlled airspace, an overview of key changes, appropriate communications and use of radio, differences in visual flight rules and instrument flight rules language and where to go for more information. There is detailed information on radio frequencies used at non-controlled aerodromes. In the vicinity of unchartered aerodromes pilots have the discretion to use the most appropriate frequency for safe operations. It is recommended pilots use the area VHF, but they may use the MULTICOM 126.7 MHz. The eLearning looks at the importance of ‘alerted’ see and avoid, gives examples of correct and incorrect radio broadcasts and sets out when radio broadcasts must be made. The training takes only 15 minutes to complete and is available by logging into CASA’s AviationWorx and selecting the class G airspace radio procedures course.

Find the radio procedures eLearning in AviationWorx.

Go to other non-controlled airspace education resources.

Behind airspace infringements

The top five factors that contribute to airspace infringements have been identified and prioritised from information collected by surveying pilots who have been involved in airspace infringements. They are pilot distraction, misreading charts, high workload in the cockpit, unexpected air traffic control instructions and incorrect use of equipment. All pilots that enter either civil or military airspace without a clearance are asked to complete an online survey form. Pilot distraction or inattention is the number one factor contributing to airspace infringements. Survey results indicate this is not due to inexperience as the average flying experience for a pilot involved in an airspace infringement is 3052 hours. Most were private flights and 52 per cent of pilots surveyed belonged to an aero club or flying school. Most respondents said they flew only occasionally in the area in where they had the infringement, and the majority were trying to remain outside of controlled airspace. This is consistent with misreading charts being one of the key factors behind airspace infringements.

Read more about the airspace infringements survey results.

Get airspace infringements resources.

Passenger comfort device advice

CASA has recently published detailed guidance on cabin safety issues relating to passenger comfort devices. Passenger comfort devices include baby hammocks, knee defenders and leg hammocks. While these devices may not contravene safety regulations, they can pose cabin safety hazards. CASA recommends air operators identify devices that passengers may seek to use and conduct a risk assessment. Cabin safety procedures and training should be developed that set out crew responsibilities in relation to passenger comfort devices. Issues to be covered include when devices can and cannot be used, ensuring emergency equipment is not restricted, verification that excessive loads will not be placed on seats or floor structures, safety risks for other passengers, interference with seat belts and appropriate stowage during take-off, landings or turbulence. The way information about comfort devices will be communicated to passengers also needs to be determined.

Find out about the management of passenger comfort devices.

Strong response to drone proposals

There was a strong response to the consultation undertaken on proposed drone accreditation and registration. More than 2850 people and organisations submitted comments on the proposed requirements, which are scheduled to be phased in during late 2019 and 2020. All recreational drones weighing more than 250 grams would be covered by the registration and accreditation requirements, unless they were model aircraft operated at CASA-approved model airfields. To gain accreditation people will need to do an online education course – watching a video and answering a quiz on the relevant drone rules. People who already hold a drone licence will not have to do the accreditation course. There will be a modest fee for registration of $20 or less for recreational drone flyers, with a higher fee applying to commercial drone operators. The exact fee levels have not yet been finalised.

Find the responses to the drone accreditation and registration proposals.

Development continues on Plain English guide to new regs

Work is continuing on the development of a plain English guide to the new Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Extracts from the guide to the new general operating and flight rules have been made available for comment over the last few months to gauge if the extracts are easy-to-read and understand, retain the true meaning of the regulations and strike the right balance between technical accuracy and simple writing. Feedback received so far has indicated overwhelming support for development of such plain English guides to enhance understanding of all regulations. Work is now underway on improving and enhancing the current document based on comments received. The intention is to provide an advance draft of the guide by mid-2019, followed by the completion of the document in early 2020. Further consideration will be given to developing similar guides for other regulations that require widespread understanding by large audiences and impact on multiple sectors of the aviation industry.

Go to the Part 91 extracts and provide feedback by Friday 31 May 2019.

Have your say on airspace consultations

A number of airspace consultations are currently open for comment. The consultations include a review of the airspace within 35 nautical miles of Hobart Airport, which is the first airspace review to be conducted using CASA’s Consultation Hub. The review is open until Friday 31 May 2019. Two airspace change proposals on Lowering Class E airspace for continental Australia and Class E airspace trial – Ayers Rock Aerodrome are also open for comment until 23 June 2019.

Have your say now on the proposed Preliminary Airspace Review Hobart 2019, the Airspace change proposals Lowering Class E airspace for continental Australia and Class E airspace trial – Ayers Rock Aerodrome.

In brief

  • Candidates applying for a recreational pilot licence are being reminded they must pass either the recreational pilot licence (aeroplane) or recreational pilot licence (helicopter) exam. After 30 June 2019, CASA records must show a pass in these exams for a recreational pilot licence application to be processed. Passes for the old basic aeronautical knowledge exams will not satisfy the requirements for the issue of a recreational pilot licence.
  • A special airworthiness information bulletin has been issued by the US Federal Aviation Administration about an airworthiness concern for all helicopters that have specific Goodrich Rescue Hoists installed. The bulletin contains inspection procedures to ensure the carrier retainer spring of the hoist is fully engaged.
  • Comment on proposed amendments to standards for instrument flight procedure design. Amendments to the Part 173 manual of standards would permanently set in place a longstanding temporary exemption arrangement relating to instrument flight procedure publishing standards and clarify the requirements for calculating visibility minima. Comment by 2 June 2019.

Safety seminars for pilots

Pilots in five regional locations around Australia are invited to attend an AvSafety seminar in June 2019. The seminars will help pilots develop skills in three key areas – communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. A practical scenario will be used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots will work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. Pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In June 2019 seminars are being held at:

  • Bathurst
  • Colac
  • Hamilton
  • Orange
  • Tooradin.

Don’t miss out by booking a pilot seminar now.

Engineering seminar

CASA is holding an engineering safety seminar at Bankstown on 26 June 2019. The seminar will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. Engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and maintenance training personnel will all benefit from attending the seminar. This is a great professional development opportunity, allowing people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions.

Book a place now at an engineering seminar.

Flight instructor workshops

Flight instructor safety workshops are being held in Cairns and Townsville in June 2019. The workshops include case studies, discussion topics and group exercises. Some of the topics covered will be maintaining good situational awareness in the training environment, anticipating student actions, understanding Part 61 requirements, use of GPS in the instructional environment, online resources for instructors and students and maximising the benefit of flight reviews. CASA’s aviation safety advisers will run the free workshops, which will include time for questions and feedback. The Cairns workshop is being held on Tuesday 11 June 2019 and Townsville on Thursday 13 June 2019.

Book your place now for the flight instructor workshops.

Safeskies safety managers forum

A safety managers forum is being held in Canberra on 16 October 2019. The forum will feature CASA and industry specialist speakers and is being run in conjunction with the Safeskies conference. This interactive forum will allow safety managers to discuss the range of issues they face in day-to-day operations, consider solutions and develop a network of safety managers across Australia. Registrations for the safety managers forum will open soon.

Register now for the Safeskies conference.

April 2019 regulatory wrap-up [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Instruments

Drones MOS made

The Manual of Standards for Part 101 Unmanned Aircraft and Rockets – commonly known as drones – was made 9 April 2019. It details the safety and regulatory oversight of remotely piloted aircraft, including training and competency standards for remote pilot licences, and standing approvals for certain kinds of operations near aerodromes and beyond visual line of sight provided they meet conditions and requirements prescribed by the MOS.

Definitions for flight operations regulations made

Definitions to support the suite of Flight Operations Regulations (Part 91, 119, 121, 133, 135, 138) have been made. View the associated amendment regulation on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Consultations

Changes to air traffic control standards for parallel runway operations

Consultation on a proposal to change air traffic control (ATC) standards for parallel runway operations (including those in use at Sydney (Kingsford Smith) aerodrome, and in the near future, Brisbane aerodrome, closed on 1 May 2019. We are now reviewing the feedback.

Update to aeroplane flight simulator standards – Part 60 MOS

Consultation on a proposal to amend the Part 60 MOS to directly reference the latest ICAO, FAA and EASA standards for flight simulators closed on 10 April 2019. We have completed analysis – which was largely positive – and are developing a detailed response to constructive input received during the consultation period.

Resources

New eLearning course on Class G airspace radio procedures

We have published a new eLearning course designed to help pilots operate safely in non-controlled airspace. The Class G Airspace Radio Procedures module is available through AviationWorx on the CASA website. Also see the related resource booklet, Be heard, be seen, be safe, available in hard copy via the CASA Online Store, or viewed on the CASA website.

CASA Registration/Accreditation EXEMPTION - RESENT.

Members,


Please be advised:


THIS MESSAGE IS BEING RESENT. 


The AMAS Inc committee requests those members seeking exemption from registration/accreditation to complete a society form compiling details required for the CASA. The form can be found here:

Link for members only.

Furthermore, the request for data is open to AMAS Inc Individual Members, Groups, Clubs, Entities including the Schools,Air Cadets  Scouts, Universities etc partnering with the AMAS Inc. 

Any questions, please do not hesitate to contact any of the committee at any time regarding this matter.


Furthermore,

Correspondence received from the Manager, Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Policy and Regulation, Mr Andrew Ward below:


"UNCLASSIFIED

Mike,

 

The meeting referred to on the MAAA webpage was the result of a request by MAAA to meet with CASA and occurred prior to the TWG meeting at which you were present in Brisbane.

 

I indicated verbally at the TWG meeting that CASA will reach out to MAAA and AMAS soon to commence the process of establishing a site list that would form the exception(s) to the rule of being required to be accredited/registered. The 25th March 2019 CASA meeting with MAAA was prior to the TWG meeting (27th March 2019 ) and thus not the (future) interaction to which I was referring.

 

As the webpage indicates the MAAA sought a meeting with senior CASA managers, and was granted a meeting.

 

CASA is happy to meet representatives of aviation community organisations in including AMAS, particularly when we are conducting a public consultation on proposed amendments to policy.

 

The advice and clarity in relation to the proposed reforms and potential impacts that you received at the TWG and which was subsequently detailed in the slides that were provided post meeting should be regarded as the most current information available at this time.

 

Regard

 

I suggest the following timetable for the process?

 

  1. Exploration Phase - by 30 April 2019(*Note - This date is now extended to the 7th May) AMAS seeks from its members 'bids' for a location to be placed on a list of routinely used model aircraft sites.
  2. Diligence Phase - 1 May - 1 June 2019 - CASA conducts 'testing' on the proposed localities to ensure quality of the data. We propose to randomly check a good sample of the data to ensure integrity.
  3. Drafting Phase - 1 - 30 June 2019 CASA legislative drafters are tasked with converting the validated list of localities into a legislative instrument that would provide the required exception to the requirement for persons to comply with registration/accreditation requirements providing they are compliant with local requirements.

 

Can I confirm the above is acceptable to you?

 

As promised at the TWG I will arrange for someone from CASA RPAS Branch to act as a contact point for AMAS for this matter, and I will ask for them to reach out to you.

 

 

Andrew


Andrew Ward

Manager - Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Policy and Regulation

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) Branch

CASA\Aviation Group

p:   m: 

16 Furzer Street, Phillip ACT 2600

GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601 Australia

www.casa.gov.au

Can I fly there? Drone safety app

Drones RPAS information on the CASA website

Subscribe to CASA's mailing list on RPAS

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail"


CASA Registration/Accreditation 2-19 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Members,

Please be advised:

The AMAS Inc committee requests those members seeking exemption from registration/accreditation to complete a society form compiling details required for the CASA. The form can be found here:

Link only available for members.

Furthermore, the request for data is open to AMAS Inc Individual Members, Groups, Clubs, Entities including the Schools,Air Cadets  Scouts, Universities etc partnering with the AMAS Inc. 

Any questions, please do not hesitate to contact any of the committee at any time regarding this matter.


Furthermore,

Correspondence received from the Manager, Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Policy and Regulation, Mr Andrew Ward below:


"UNCLASSIFIED

Mike,

 

The meeting referred to on the MAAA webpage was the result of a request by MAAA to meet with CASA and occurred prior to the TWG meeting at which you were present in Brisbane.

 

I indicated verbally at the TWG meeting that CASA will reach out to MAAA and AMAS soon to commence the process of establishing a site list that would form the exception(s) to the rule of being required to be accredited/registered. The 25th March 2019 CASA meeting with MAAA was prior to the TWG meeting (27th March 2019 ) and thus not the (future) interaction to which I was referring.

 

As the webpage indicates the MAAA sought a meeting with senior CASA managers, and was granted a meeting.

 

CASA is happy to meet representatives of aviation community organisations in including AMAS, particularly when we are conducting a public consultation on proposed amendments to policy.

 

The advice and clarity in relation to the proposed reforms and potential impacts that you received at the TWG and which was subsequently detailed in the slides that were provided post meeting should be regarded as the most current information available at this time.

 

Regard

 

I suggest the following timetable for the process?

 

  1. Exploration Phase - by 30 April 2019(*Note – This date is now extended to the 7th May) AMAS seeks from its members ‘bids’ for a location to be placed on a list of routinely used model aircraft sites.
  2. Diligence Phase - 1 May – 1 June 2019 – CASA conducts ‘testing’ on the proposed localities to ensure quality of the data. We propose to randomly check a good sample of the data to ensure integrity.
  3. Drafting Phase - 1 – 30 June 2019 CASA legislative drafters are tasked with converting the validated list of localities into a legislative instrument that would provide the required exception to the requirement for persons to comply with registration/accreditation requirements providing they are compliant with local requirements.

 

Can I confirm the above is acceptable to you?

 

As promised at the TWG I will arrange for someone from CASA RPAS Branch to act as a contact point for AMAS for this matter, and I will ask for them to reach out to you.

 

 

Andrew


Andrew Ward

Manager – Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Policy and Regulation

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) Branch

CASA\Aviation Group

p:   m: 

16 Furzer Street, Phillip ACT 2600

GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601 Australia

www.casa.gov.au

Can I fly there? Drone safety app

Drones RPAS information on the CASA website

Subscribe to CASA’s mailing list on RPAS

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail"


CASA Briefing Newsletter - April 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody comments:

Key steps are being taken in the ongoing transformation of CASA’s service delivery. Work has been underway for some time on making significant improvements in service delivery, with the focus on streamlining processes, moving them online and having a single-entry point to engage with CASA online - myCASA. The aviation community should have confidence that we are striving to make dealing with CASA less complex. We must have simpler processes and faster turnaround times to make it easier to deal with CASA. Of course, there are important benefits for CASA too in making service delivery improvements like less paperwork, less double handling, data being in one place and having time more to focus on complex cases.

This month there were several achievements in the work to deliver better regulatory services. The chief pilots of remotely piloted aircraft training organisations can now lodge remote pilot licence applications online and remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificates without changes can be renewed online. This means drone training organisations no longer need to scan paper forms and send them to CASA, instead managing the remote pilot licence process through CASA’s online portal. Once these services are operating smoothly we plan to expand our online capabilities to cover other services. You should recall that the application process for aviation reference numbers has been available online since last year, significantly speeding up the issuing process. Similarly, aviation medical applications have been online for some time.

Please find the self-service portal and more information on remotely piloted aircraft online services.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Latest news

Update on Part 135

Work to finalise the manual of standards to support the new Part 135 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations is making good progress. Part 135 sets out the rules covering smaller aeroplanes used in air transport operations and comes into effect in March 2021. The new regulations were made in December 2018. The manual of standards will cover a range of issues including the rules related to document carriage, flights to remote islands, fuel carriage, aeroplane performance, equipment carriage and crew training and checking. It will be finalised in 2019. CASA is also developing explanatory and guidance material to assist the aviation community transition to and comply with the new regulations, including sample manuals for operators. This material will be provided well in advance of the March 2021 commencement date for Part 135. The new regulations introduce common rules for all air transport operations – doing away with the current distinction between charter and regular public transport. There are safety enhancements such as crew training and checking requirements, human factors training and safety management systems. The implementation of new requirements will be scaled to fit the size and complexity of operations to keep the regulatory burden to a minimum.

Keep up-to-date with Part 135 and other operational developments by subscribing to the flight operations mailing list.

Risk profile for GA maintenance

CASA is developing a safety risk profile for the general aviation maintenance sector. To assist in the development of the risk profile a survey of relevant maintenance organisations will be conducted in May 2019 and CASA is encouraging participation. The survey will collect valuable data to accurately inform risk analysis and should only take 20 to 30 minutes to complete. Sector risk profiles are an important tool in understanding the safety challenges and issues for different segments of the aviation community. They present a picture of the current key safety risks facing a sector and assist in developing a deeper understanding of the effects of these risks. The profiles look at how the level of risks can be reduced and managed by the participants in each sector and CASA, as well as evaluating the effectiveness of risk treatments through a set of safety performance indicators. CASA is also reviewing previous safety risk profiles for aerial mustering and aerodromes, with updated reports to be issued later in 2019.

Read sector risk profile reports.

R22 maintenance warning

The investigation into a fatal Robinson R22 crash has led to the issue of an important safety notice. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau issued the notice in relation to the replacement of self-locking nuts on Robinson helicopters. Although the issue has not yet been identified as a contributing factor in the R22 crash near Cloncurry in 2017, it was highlighted by post-crash evidence. A standard maintenance practice of re-using self-locking nuts on Robinson helicopters may inadvertently result in a failure to install corrosion resistant nuts on critical fasteners. The investigation of the Cloncurry crash found a missing fastener in the helicopter’s flight control system. The fastener attached the cyclic bell crank to the push-pull rod. The bolt was found but the nut was missing and heat damage on the end of the bell crank with the missing nut was different to elsewhere. This indicated the bolt was not in-situ at the time of the post-impact fire. The ATSB concluded the nut came off due to hydrogen embrittlement. In the course of interviewing personnel employed by the maintenance organisation of the crashed helicopter, the ATSB noted a low level of awareness of the need to replace nuts when critical fasteners were reassembled.

Read the ATSB safety advisory notice.

Change to parallel runway standards

CASA is proposing an amendment to the safety standards covering parallel runway operations. These standards are contained in the Part 172 manual of standards. Part 172 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations provides the regulatory framework for air traffic service providers, including standards for air traffic facilities, safety management and the provision of air traffic services. The Australian standards for parallel runway operations are based on International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards originally introduced in 1995 and only allow the use of an instrument landing system for final approach guidance during parallel runway operations. Air traffic control is required to manually vector all arriving aircraft onto final approach. In 2018 ICAO updated its standards for parallel runway operations to allow for the use of a number of other systems including approach procedures with vertical guidance. CASA is proposing to adopt the new ICAO standards for use in Australia. The new standards will initially apply to Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport and in the future Brisbane or other aerodromes with parallel runway operations.

Find out more about the parallel runway proposals.

Cabin safety – training and minimum equipment

Cabin safety bulletins about crew training facilities and devices and minimum equipment lists have been released. The cabin crew training bulletin covers issues such as classroom facilities, instructional aids, training device types, firefighting and water survival and touch drills. When using training devices operators should have a documented procedure to ensure they are representative of aircraft types, particularly in relation to door operating forces. Components should be representative of those found on an aircraft. These can include dials, handles, switches and restraint brackets and the force required for their operation. A simulated firefighting exercise should be conducted in a confined area to simulate cabin fire. This should include aircraft furnishings, such as seating, galley units, lavatories, panels, overhead bins and waste bins. The cabin safety minimum equipment list bulletin explains how CASA evaluates a minimum equipment list, as well as providing information on warning signs, placarding and training.

Find out more about cabin crew training facilities and minimum equipment lists.

Drone detection action

CASA has been using drone detection surveillance equipment at major events at various locations to monitor drone operations and support enforcement of the safety rules. In recent weeks drone surveillance was undertaken at events in Canberra and the Gold Coast. A number of drones were detected potentially operating in breach of the regulations and enforcement action is being pursued where appropriate. CASA is also using the equipment for surveillance at major aerodromes and around Sydney Harbour, a known drone hot spot. The data collected about drone operations will be used to inform education and information strategies, which is important in the lead up to the introduction of mandatory drone registration and accreditation in the second half of 2019. The portable surveillance equipment detects drones inflight and provides the location on the ground of the controller. CASA continues to issue penalties where there is evidence of drone safety regulation breaches, with recent penalties in excess of $1000. A man was recently convicted in the Victorian Magistrates court of three drone offences - commercial operations without holding a remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificate and for two instances of operating over a populous area at a height from which the drone would not have been able to safely clear the area in the event of a component failure. Fines and costs totalled more than $1500.

In brief

  • Pilots need to be aware from 23 May 2019 there will be a difference in air traffic control radio transmissions. The change will see transmissions of flight levels that include whole hundred numbers made with the word “hundred”, rather than “zero zero”. For example, an instruction to “climb to flight level two zero zero” will become “climb to flight level two hundred”. Other flight level assignments, headings, wind direction and speed, and runway identifiers will continue to be transmitted by pronouncing each digit separately.
  • The instrument setting conditions on the flight crew licences of pilots conducting community service flights has been amended to allow helicopters to operate these flights. This follows feedback from the aviation community. This extension will allow a greater number of pilots to volunteer their aircraft, time and skills to the community service flights sector. Find out more about community service flight conditions.
  • Pilots can refresh their knowledge of radio procedures in non-controlled airspace by reading the ‘Be heard, be seen, be safe’ booklet. A PDF can be downloaded from the CASA website. Or a hard copy can be ordered from the CASA online store.
  • Minor updates have been made to the advisory publication on pilot maintenance. This includes updates about who can carry out a schedule 8 maintenance and clarified information about inspections and checks.
  • CASA is running a survey to find out views on the flight planning kit. The kit is designed to assist low-hour VFR pilots with good flight planning habits. It contains a handbook outlining eight stages of a flight, a flight planning notepad, personal minimums card, time in your tanks card, non-controlled airport procedures, be heard be seen be safe booklet, and a number of Bureau of Meteorology cards. Have your say on the kit.
  • New drone technical requirements have been released in the just released manual of standards for Part 101 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. The new requirements mainly apply to commercial and professional drone pilots and operators. Several of new requirements apply immediately while the rest do not take effect until 2020. Changes taking effect now relate to on-going approval of extended visual line of sight operations and ensuring there is a buffer between drones and any controlled airspace.

Safety seminars for pilots

Pilots in 14 regional locations around Australia are invited to attend an AvSafety seminar in May 2019. The seminars will help pilots develop skills in three key areas – communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. A practical scenario will be used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots will work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. Pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In May 2019 seminars are being held at:

  • Armidale
  • Alice Springs
  • Burnie
  • Bunbury
  • Cessnock
  • Geraldton
  • Inverell
  • Jandakot
  • Kyneton
  • Launceston
  • Port Pirie
  • Scone
  • Townsville
  • Yulara

Don’t miss out by booking a pilot seminar now.

Five engineering seminars

CASA is holding five engineering safety seminars in May 2019. The seminars will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. Engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and maintenance training personnel will all benefit from attending the seminars. These are great professional development opportunities, allowing people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions.

Engineering seminars in May 2019 are being held at:

  • Alice Springs
  • Gold Coast
  • Gove
  • Southport
  • Toowoomba.

Book a place now at an engineering seminar.

CASA RPAS TWG MEETING PRESENTATION [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Members,

Correspondence received from the ASAP and RAPAC Secretariat:

Please find the amended presentation from the TWG attached(link). I think the slide you were most interested in is Slide/Page 12.

 

Best regards,


Industry Relations Administrator

ASAP and RAPAC Secretariat

CASA\Stakeholder Engagement Division

 GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601

 

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY NOTICE OF GENERAL MEETING. 3-19

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom Video Conference

10:00 AM AEST Saturday 16th March, 2019

at   Victory Parade, Tascott. NSW 2251.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 21st February, 2019.

 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 22nd February 2019 for initial consideration . Refer Annex A.

 

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 28th February.No amendments received. 

 

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 1st March to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 14th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.


Annex A:


1I, John D. Taylor, being a financial member of AMAS Inc., Move the following Motion:

That the financial year of the AMAS Inc., be changed as follows: The financial year will commence on 1st June each year and cease on  the 31st May in the following year.
Reason, this will allow Treasurers  to better formulate the budget prior to the Annual General Meeting.
Signed
John D. Taylor

2I, John D Taylor, being a financial member of AMAS Inc wish to move a Motion that the Honorarium paid to our Secretary be increased from $3000 to $5000 from the 2019/2020 financial year.

Our Secretary has an ever increasing workload due to our rising membership and is available 24/7 for the benefit of all members. He is available by phone or email at all times, and can and does provide valuable advice to all, as well as looking after our very informative website and Facebook page.

The Secretary's position also involves attendance at Seminars and consultation with CASA and other local, State and Federal bodies

Furthermore ,taking into consideration the fact that he was not given any recompense(except this year) for the preceding years since the creation of AMAS, I believe this increase is fair and justified.

It should also be noted that all members of the Committee are volunteers and in some cases have full time jobs and all are dedicated to looking after the best interests of our members.


 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary AMAS inc

0417879416

CASA Briefing Newsletter - February 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

Improved standards for community service flights are being introduced to enhance public confidence in the safety of these important services. We have now set new minimum standards for pilots operating community service flights, identified the kinds of aircraft that can be used and set out appropriate maintenance and operating requirements. The new standards were put in place following consultation with community service flight organisations, pilots, the broader aviation community and the general public. The centrepiece of the new safety standards is a requirement for pilots to have appropriate flying experience before they undertake community service flights.

These new safety standards take into account the special nature of community service flights, which can be very different to private flights. These flights can put a lot of responsibility and sometimes considerable pressure on pilots. It is only fair to the pilots, patients and carers to ensure there are appropriate safety standards that go beyond those required for everyday private flying. CASA does not believe these standards will have an adverse impact on the majority of community service flights, as most pilots already tend to be more experienced.

Noting the occurrences, accidents and fatal accidents in community service flight operations, we believe it is appropriate for these steps to be taken. There were more than 200 responses to our consultation on the issue and we carefully assessed all the feedback before making significant amendments to the original proposals. One of the major changes was to remove proposed engine maintenance requirements, which we concluded would have been too onerous. It is important to understand these conditions only apply to pilots conducting community service flights. To be considered a community service flight, the flight must be brokered by an entity for a charitable or community service purpose.

Find out more about community service flight conditions.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Plain English guide to new regs coming

A key step has been taken in the development of a plain English guide to the new Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Extracts from the guide to the new general operating and flight rules have been released for comment. The extracts show how the guide will provide information on complying with the regulations in simple and concise language, using effective graphics to explain requirements. CASA is asking pilots to assess if the extracts are easy-to-read and understand, retain the true meaning of the regulations and strike the right balance between technical accuracy and simple writing. Copies of a brochure containing the Part 91 plain English guide extracts will be released at the Avalon Air Show and are being distributed at CASA’s AvSafety seminars for pilots during March and April 2019. A version of brochure is also available on CASA’s web site, where feedback can be lodged. Once the guide is completed it will mean pilots will not need to refer directly to the regulations to understand and comply with the general operating and flight rules, although the regulations themselves will remain the legal reference for compliance. The guide is primarily intended for general aviation pilots and flying schools.

Go to the Part 91 extracts and provide feedback.

New safety tool for pilots

An expansive, updated and improved resource kit for all pilots on safety behaviours has been produced by CASA. The revised safety behaviours kit will become a must have tool for pilots at all levels of flying. The kit includes ten booklets covering a range of topics relevant to individual pilots and small air operators, a workbook with practical exercises, discussion areas and reference material and a suite of videos containing interviews with aviation experts and practitioners. Topics covered include safety culture, human performance, communication, teamwork, situational awareness, decision making, threat and error management, human information processing and design and automation. A central theme of the kit is that while it is impossible to eliminate all errors, consequences can be successfully mitigated by understanding human factors principles. The kit can be obtained through CASA’s online store, with the videos available both online and on USB.

Order your safety behaviours kit from the online store.

Right radio use in non-controlled airspace

There’s plenty of information available for pilots on radio procedures in non-controlled airspace. This is important following CASA’s clarification of the appropriate VHF frequencies to use in the vicinity of aerodromes in class G airspace. In many situations in non-controlled airspace CASA recommends using the area frequency. However, in the vicinity of uncharted aerodromes, pilots have discretion to use the most appropriate frequency that ensures safe operation. This can be MULTICOM 126.7MHz. The latest procedures are set out in a revised radio procedures booklet, available from the CASA online store. They will also be contained in the Aeronautical Information Publication to be released in late February 2019 and a new Civil Aviation Advisory Publication. All pilots operating in non-controlled airspace should refer to these resources to ensure they operate safely. In the booklet ‘Be heard, be seen, be safe’ there is information on radio carriage, frequencies, when broadcasts must and should be made and how to make effective broadcasts.

Order a copy of the radio procedures booklet.

Fatigue management progress

There was a strong response to the latest consultation on proposed new fatigue management rules, with 331 people and organisations lodging feedback. CASA is now analysing the feedback, along with input from a fatigue technical working group. The issue will be considered by the Aviation Safety Advisory Group in March 2018 before CASA reaches a final position. CASA is aiming to make the Civil Aviation Order 48.1 instrument on fatigue as quickly as possible, with transition to the new requirements scheduled to be completed by March 2020. Many high capacity air operators are in the process of developing fatigue risk management systems and Qantas has begun a 12-month trial. The latest consultation on new fatigue rules followed an independent review of fatigue requirements, which made 24 recommendations. The proposed flight duty period limits incorporate key scientific principles. These include protecting sleep opportunity prior to duty, prescribing maximum flight duty periods to limit time awake, reducing flight duty periods for start times that impact pilot ability to sleep or require duty during the window of circadian low and permitting extended flight duty periods with crew augmentation and appropriate rest facilities.

Find out more about fatigue management.

Revised aerodrome rules are here

Revised regulations covering the operations of aerodromes have been formally made. The revised Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations includes a range of changes to the rules covering aerodromes to reduce complexity and costs and improve operational flexibility. The revised regulations and associated manual of standards will not take effect until mid-2020 and there will be transition arrangements. One of the key changes is the move from existing aerodrome certificates to a ‘scalable certificate’. The premise of scalability is that busier airports with more aircraft and passenger movements will face higher regulatory requirements. There are technical changes in the manual of standards to more closely align Australia with International Civil Aviation Organization standards and recommended practices. The new regulations are more outcome-based, so aerodromes can be responsible for how best to achieve safety requirements based on their own individual circumstances. To help airports manage the changes, and in acknowledgment that some older aerodromes were built as far back as World War II and beyond, CASA is updating grandfathering provisions for some existing aerodrome facilities. These aerodromes can still operate to existing standards until they make the decision to upgrade or replace a facility. An important change for many airports under the new rules is the requirement for registered aerodromes to produce an aerodrome manual. CASA is redeveloping the aerodrome manual template and will have an online manual building tool to provide step-by-step guidance. Registered aerodromes without a current manual can build one quickly using the online tool, which will have pre-loaded text and guidance material.

Find out more about the revised aerodrome regulations.

In Brief

  • The 2018 edition of the aircraft maintenance engineer careers guide has been released. It provides helpful tips on how to become an aircraft engineer; how to get a licence and where to go for the appropriate training. The guide will help people becoming engineers to maintain high standards of aviation safety. Get the guide now.
  • Air operators and Part 141 certificate holders were given more time to comply with the new fuel rules. However, from 28 February 2019 they must comply with the requirements of the new regulation and the fuel instrument. Find out more.
  • The summary of feedback on the proposed new rules for rotorcraft air transport operations in Parts 119 and 133 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations has been published. The feedback indicated broad aviation community support for the proposed changes. The proposed rules introduce safety enhancements such as an adaptable rotorcraft code of performance, flight and other crew member training and checking requirements and scalable safety management systems. Read the feedback.
  • Guidance material on the design, development and delivery of passenger safety information has been updated. There’s new information on safety briefings for passengers on helicopter and balloon flights and guidance material concerning cabin baggage and portable electronic devices. Read the Civil Aviation Advisory Publication.
  • The Bureau of Meteorology is moving its aviation meteorologists into two new aviation forecasting centres in Brisbane and Melbourne. These centres will deliver most aviation services across Australia by mid-2020, using the very latest advances in observational and modelling capabilities. There will be no change to the number of meteorologists employed and aviation operators across Australia will receive a greater level of service irrespective of where they are based. Find out more about the Bureau changes.

Fourteen pilot safety seminars

CASA’s popular AvSafety seminars for pilots will continue during March 2019. The seminars focus on developing pilot skills in three key areas – communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. A practical scenario is used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars. Extracts from the new plain English guide to the Part 91 operating and flight rules will be available at seminars during March and April 2019 for review and comment.

In March 2019 seminars are being held at:

  • Cooma
  • Point Cook
  • Broken Hill
  • Deniliquin
  • Swan Hill
  • Kalgoorlie
  • Bundaberg
  • Maryborough
  • Mildura
  • Innisfail
  • Latrobe Valley
  • Mareeba
  • Bairnsdale
  • Albany.

Book a place at a pilot safety seminar.

Engineering seminar

CASA is holding an engineering safety seminar in March 2019 at Maryborough. The seminar will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. Engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and maintenance training personnel will all benefit from attending the seminar. This is a great professional development opportunity, allowing people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. The Maryborough engineering seminar is being held on Wednesday 20 March 2019 at the Maryborough Aero Club.

Find out more and book a place at the Maryborough engineering seminar.

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY NOTICE OF GENERAL MEETING. 2-19

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom Video Conference

10:00 AM AEST Saturday 16th March, 2019

at   Victory Parade, Tascott. NSW 2251.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 21st February, 2019.

 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 22nd February 2019 for initial consideration . Refer Annex A.

 

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 28th February.

 

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 1st March to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 14th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.


Annex A:


1I, John D. Taylor, being a financial member of AMAS Inc., Move the following Motion:

That the financial year of the AMAS Inc., be changed as follows: The financial year will commence on 1st June each year and cease on  the 31st May in the following year.
Reason, this will allow Treasurers  to better formulate the budget prior to the Annual General Meeting.
Signed
John D. Taylor

2I, John D Taylor, being a financial member of AMAS Inc wish to move a Motion that the Honorarium paid to our Secretary be increased from $3000 to $5000 from the 2019/2020 financial year.

Our Secretary has an ever increasing workload due to our rising membership and is available 24/7 for the benefit of all members. He is available by phone or email at all times, and can and does provide valuable advice to all, as well as looking after our very informative website and Facebook page.

The Secretary's position also involves attendance at Seminars and consultation with CASA and other local, State and Federal bodies

Furthermore ,taking into consideration the fact that he was not given any recompense(except this year) for the preceding years since the creation of AMAS, I believe this increase is fair and justified.

It should also be noted that all members of the Committee are volunteers and in some cases have full time jobs and all are dedicated to looking after the best interests of our members.


 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary AMAS inc

0417879416

CASA: One week left to give feedback on proposed RPA registration and accreditation [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

**One week left to give feedback on proposed RPA registration and
accreditation**

The consultation on the proposed registration and accreditation of remotely
piloted aircraft - often called drones - closes on 22 February 2019.

Thank you for everyone who has taken the time to give their feedback. For
those who haven't yet: we welcome all comments. Important to note, we can
only accept formal responses through our Consultation Hub.

When providing feedback, please consider a few key aspects of our proposal:

- while each RPA must be registered, recreational RPA operators will only
need to pay one registration fee per year, not a fee per RPA  
- we are proposing a registration fee of $20 or less per person per year 
- accreditation is free.

The requirements are not proposed to apply to the following:

- RPA that weigh 250g or less and operated recreationally
- RPA (that includes model aircraft) operated at CASA-approved model
aircraft airfields
- RPA operated recreationally indoors.

Make sure your comments count and submit your feedback through our
Consultation Hub:
http://mailinglist.casa.gov.au/lists/lt.php?tid=0n37eFg6k9yR8//qTzU953yWDUe7R29iviRNjXUCbxzXDhfKaYFsM6pGtu6jYXKH
by 22 February.



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AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY NOTICE OF GENERAL MEETING. 1-19

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom Video Conference

10:00 PM AEST Saturday 16th March, 2019

at   Victory Parade, Tascott. NSW 2251.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 21st February, 2019.

 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 22nd February 2019 for initial consideration .

 

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 28th February.

 

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 1st March to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 14th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary AMAS inc

0417879416

CASA Briefing Newsletter - January 2019 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

Successfully finalising outstanding projects and regulatory changes has been a priority since I stepped into the position of CEO and Director of Aviation Safety. It was very clear there were too many issues which had simply dragged on for too long. This situation was not fair on the aviation community and meant CASA resources were continually being juggled between ongoing commitments and the need to address new issues and challenges. It made it harder to make progress on organisational, regulatory and service improvements. As we launch into 2019 the good news is very substantial progress has been made on outstanding projects and reforms. The new suite of flight operations regulations has been made, the aviation medical system has been reformed, new training regulations are in place and the policy on low level frequency use has been settled. We have a new and improved approach to safety surveillance and the transition to the new sport aviation regulations is underway.

Of course, there is still much work to be done in relation to many of these issues, but we have jumped significant hurdles that in the past have slowed us down. A key benefit of our achievements, which have been made with the contribution and co-operation of a raft of people across the aviation community, is that we can spend more time and effort focusing on the future. We can identify further improvements and reforms that will contribute to better aviation safety outcomes and seek better ways of doing business and delivering services and safety support to the aviation community. One area in which more will be done is the delivery of online services for functions such as licensing and aircraft registration.

Being a regulator means there will always be critics. Some will say we are too prescriptive, too heavy handed and not flexible. Others will say we take too long to deliver outcomes and are not closely enough engaged with the aviation community. At times these comments may be true, but I can assure everyone we will be working hard in 2019 to be the best possible aviation safety regulator for all sectors of the aviation community and the broader Australian public.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

Book now for special Avalon safety forum

It’s time to book a place at an important safety event at this year’s Avalon air show. CASA, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau and Airservices Australia are presenting the FlySafe 2019 Aviation Safety Forum. A range of safety experts will share their knowledge on positive safety reporting cultures and will work though responses to a hypothetical accident at a busy airport. The hypothetical will bring to life the roles each aviation agency plays in learning from accidents and improving safety. FlySafe 2019 is a first for the Australian aviation community and is open to Avalon air show trade visitors, exhibitors and conference delegates. The program includes presentations from Airservices CEO Jason Harfield; ATSB Chief Commissioner Greg Hood; and CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody. The forum will also hear from Group Captain Nigel Ward, Director of the Defence Flight Safety Bureau, and from the Chief Commissioner of New Zealand’s Transport Accident Investigation Commission, Jane Meares. The forum is free, but places are limited. The forum is being held on Thursday 28 February 2019.

Book a place now at the Avalon air show FlySafe 2019 forum.

Drone registration and accreditation scheme

Consultation is underway on the details of a proposed comprehensive drone registration and accreditation scheme. CASA is planning to introduce the drone registration and accreditation scheme progressively in the second half of 2019. Under the proposal all commercial drones will need to be registered, while recreational drones weighing more than 250 grams will be registered. The cost has yet to be determined by CASA. It will depend on whether the drone is flown for fun or profit. It is likely to be a $20 or less annual fee (per person) for recreational drones and for some model aircraft operators. There will also be an annual registration fee likely to range from $100 to $160 per drone for each commercial drone. Accreditation will involve online education, based around a video, and an online quiz. All recreational drone flyers 16 years and older will need to be accredited, as well as drone operators in the excluded category, which includes under two kilogram commercially operated drones. Accreditation will need to be renewed every three years. It is proposed that people will need to be 16 years or older to register a drone, with younger people needing to be supervised by a person over 18 years old. The Federal Government has supported the introduction of a mandatory accreditation and registration system for drones. This was in a response to the recommendation from a Senate Standing Committee on Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport inquiry.

Find out more about proposed drone registration and accreditation and have your say by 22 February 2019.

Drone surveillance underway

Data on drone activity near major aerodromes is being collected to inform CASA’s development of new remotely piloted aircraft safety strategies. CASA has engaged a contractor to conduct the surveillance during the first half of 2019. The surveillance will be carried out progressively at mainland capital city airports, as well as around Sydney Harbour, a known drone hotspot. Drones will be monitored at locations near aerodrome boundaries and in and around approach and departure paths. At Sydney Harbour drones will be monitored that infringe restricted airspace. In most instances, the drone surveillance equipment can see where a drone is operating, as well as showing where the controller and operator is located. The technology also provides the serial number or ID of the drone where available. While the drone surveillance is initially being conducted as a trial to gather data, it may be used by CASA for enforcement of the remotely piloted aircraft safety regulations.

Keep on top of smoke and fumes

Detailed guidance is now available on the management of odours, smoke and fumes during flights. The advice is valuable for all charter and regular public transport air operators. About seven per cent of aviation occurrences relate to fumes and smoke, so it is important for operators to have strategies and processes in place to mitigate risks and respond to events. Cabin crew members need to know how to recognise and respond to fumes and smoke, particularly fumes from air supply systems. Operators should ensure cabin crew training covers the sources and types of on-board fumes, recognising the presence of oil and hydraulic fluid fumes, the potential for impairment, procedures to apply in fume events and the reporting of fume events. Sometimes oil fumes do not smell like oil and may typically be described as mouldy/musty or dirty socks. Hydraulic fluid often has a distinctive and recognisable odour that is described as acrid, unpleasant or pungent. Training should include standardised odour descriptors typically used for air supply system-sourced oil and hydraulic fluid fumes, so aircrew can effectively communicate and report the presence of fumes or smoke.

Find out more about managing fume events.

Five airspace reviews released

A number of reports from airspace reviews have been released. These cover airspace around aerodromes at Rockhampton, Mackay, Wagga, Launceston, Alice Springs and Ayers Rock. The reviews found the airspace arrangements at each location are fit for purpose. At Wagga there are some concerns from airspace users about the mix of traffic operating in a common traffic advisory frequency environment. However, there was little support for the re-establishment of a control tower and risk analysis does not support the move. The review found there should be continuing consultation between airspace users to reinforce local procedures and communication between aircraft, as well as continuing education and information campaigns by CASA. At Alice Springs the review found there were opportunities for better management of traffic, while at Launceston changes could be made to the common traffic advisory frequency coverage. The Ayers Rock review noted Airservices Australia considers there is merit in conducting a trial of lowering Class E airspace to enhance service delivery to instrument flight rules aircraft. Airspace users – including visual flight rules aircraft – could benefit from fitment of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast avionics.

Go to the Rockhampton/Mackay, Wagga, and Alice Springs airspace reviews.

Go to the Ayers Rock review.

Go to the Launceston review.

Night aerial fire-fighting makes history

History was made in early 2019 with the first night aerial firefighting operations used to combat an out-of-control bushfire in Victoria. The Rosedale blaze in East Gippsland burnt through 12,000 hectares in less than four days in a fast-moving fire front. A total of 60 water drops were made at night on the fire, using helicopters equipped with a snorkel system that collects water from nearby dams and lakes. Aircraft crews also used night vision goggles to map out the fire, helping to provide detailed information to firefighting crews on the ground. CASA has given approval for night firefighting trials by Emergency Management Victoria, allowing aircraft to fight blazes for up to four hours after dark if they have been fighting the same fire during daylight hours. There are now two certified night fire-fighting operators, Kestrel Aviation in Mangalore and Coulson Aviation in Ballarat. Emergency Management Commissioner, Andrew Crisp, said the helicopters were deployed as part of the continuing trial into night fire suppression operations in Victoria. Mr Crisp said the Rosedale fire was a good example of a fire that could benefit from night operations and indications were that the operation went well, with further opportunities to learn.

Seminars to support pilots

CASA’s popular AvSafety seminars for pilots will continue during 2019. The current round of seminars focuses on developing pilot skills in three key areas – communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. A practical scenario is used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In February 2019 seminars are being held at:

  • Shepparton
  • Melbourne
  • Strathalbyn
  • Jindabyne
  • Nowra
  • Somersby
  • Roma
  • Temora
  • Forbes
  • Lethbridge
  • Adelaide.

Book a place now at your local AvSafety seminar.

Engineering seminar

CASA is holding an engineering safety seminar in February 2019 at Essendon. The seminar will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. Engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and maintenance training personnel will all benefit from attending the seminar. This is a great professional development opportunity, allowing people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. The Essendon engineering seminar is being held on Thursday 14 February 2019.

Find out more and book a place at the Essendon engineering seminar.

Flight instructor workshop

A flight instructor safety workshop is being held in Darwin in February 2019. The workshop includes case studies, discussion topics and group exercises. Some of the topics covered will be maintaining good situational awareness in the training environment, anticipating student actions, understanding Part 61 requirements, use of GPS in the instructional environment, online resources for instructors and students and maximising the benefit of flight reviews. CASA’s aviation safety advisers will run the free workshop, which will include time for questions and feedback. The Darwin workshop is being held on 6 February 2019.

Book your place now for the flight instructor workshop.

In brief

  • Consultation is open until 10 February 2019 on revised proposed new fatigue management rules. The proposals are of interest to holders of air operator's certificates, Part 141 certificate holders and some flight crew licence holders. Comment on the proposed fatigue changes now.
  • A new printed edition of the very popular Visual Flight Rules Guide is now available. The guide features plenty of diagrams, charts and maps to support easy-to-read information on all visual flight rules operations. Get your copy now.
  • The fourth annual printed edition of CASA’s Flight Safety Australia magazine is out now. The 2018 Flight Safety Australia Collectors' Edition is a bumper collection of more than 50 stories published in the online magazine during the year. Get your copy of Collectors’ Edition now.
  • An updated airworthiness bulletin on the calibration of compasses is available. This includes advice on calibrating and compensating aircraft magnetic compasses, as well as providing data on the maximum allowable deviations to enable compasses to be maintained to their type design. Read the compass bulletin.
  • Keen to find out more about the proposed new general aviation maintenance regulations? Watch a video now of a presentation on what the proposals mean for the general aviation sector. Go to the video.

Drone registration consultation opens - have your say [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Members,
Further to last Fridays email circular:


**Drone registration consultation opens - have your say**

Consultation is now open on CASA's proposed new registration and
accreditation scheme for drones:
http://mailinglist.casa.gov.au/lists/lt.php?tid=0n37eFg6o9yR8//qTzU95xGeqgZFkfC1gWTcQSd9SNzXDhfKaYG8M6pGtu6jYXKH

We are introducing a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) registration and RPA
operator accreditation requirement as a way of monitoring the safe and
lawful operation of RPAs, commonly known as drones - and we want your
feedback on the details of the scheme.

The registration and accreditation requirements are proposed to apply (with
certain exceptions) to drones more than 250 grams operated recreationally
and all drones operated commercially, regardless of weight.

The requirements are not proposed for drones lighter than 250 grams
operated recreationally or model aircraft flying at CASA-approved model
airfields.

Accreditation would be free and involve watching a video and answering a
quiz on drone rules. Separate accreditation courses would be available for
recreational operators and those operating excluded RPA. Accreditation
would be valid for 3 years.

The cost of registration has yet to be determined by CASA but is likely to
be a $20 or less annual fee (per person) for recreational drones and for
some model aircraft operators. There would also be an annual registration
fee likely to range from $100 to $160 per drone for each commercial drone.

**What happens next**

CASA reviews every submission and will publish a summary of consultation on
your feedback. This will inform the introduction of the registration and
accreditation scheme.

**Summary of previous consultation**

CASA has also published the summary of your feedback:
http://mailinglist.casa.gov.au/lists/lt.php?tid=U4/HCJvBWHWlXszHSPPwQBGeqgZFkeC1gWTcQSd9SNzXDhfKaYHsM6pGtu6jYXKH
to a recent consultation on proposed new rules for commercial and
professional drone operators - Proposed Part 101 (Unmanned aircraft and
rockets) Manual of Standards 2018.

For further information:
rpas@casa.gov.au



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Public consultation on RPAS registration and accreditation [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

UNCLASSIFIED

Dear RPAS Registration TWG members,

 

Firstly, I want to wish you all a happy new year! I trust you are all well.

 

I want to alert you to the now open public consultation for the proposed RPA registration and RPAS operator accreditation scheme. While CASA will inform many through our usual media channels, I’d encourage you to share the link to those within your respective organisations or networks who may be interested in completing the consultation.

 

A media release has also been published on the CASA website.

 

Best regards,

Matt

 

Matthew Di Toro

Industry Relations Administrator

ASAP and RAPAC Secretariat

CASA\Stakeholder Engagement Division

p: 02 6217 1457

 

GPO Box 2005, Canberra ACT 2601

 

www.casa.gov.au

cid:image001.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0cid:image002.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0cid:image003.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0cid:image004.png@01D1D6B5.E546EBB0

CASA Briefing Newsletter - December 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

As we rapidly approach the end of 2018, looking back over the year in aviation shows it’s been busy and productive. CASA has made improvements in aviation medicals, Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations was made in July, we continued to refine our new consultation mechanisms and we finalised transition to the new flying training regulations. Pleasingly, there was an increase in the aviation community’s level of satisfaction with CASA’s performance, which was reflected in the results of our biennial stakeholder survey.

It is important to acknowledge these achievements could not have been reached without the assistance of the aviation community. I would like to thank you all for your dedication, contribution and hard work in maintaining aviation safety.

By far our most significant achievement in 2018 was the recent making of the six new operational Parts of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. This was a journey that commenced in 1999 at the direction of the government of the day and has seen numerous priority, direction and policy changes since that time. Achieving this milestone was no small task and it required a lot of hard work and commitment from many people in CASA and the aviation community. I thank everyone who contributed to these rule sets. It is testament to our new consultative processes that we were able to ensure feedback from subject matter experts and people across aviation was received, carefully considered and incorporated as required in a timely and professional manner.

Next year won’t just be focused on working towards transition to the new flight operations regulations. We have a lot on our radar such as consulting and making the last three new regulatory Parts, transition to Part 149, remotely piloted aircraft registration, progressing change to general aviation maintenance rules, contributing to a number of key international commitments and wrapping up some long-standing matters like fatigue. The last three new regulatory Parts cover sport and recreation operations, sport and recreational parachuting and manned free balloons.

I wish everyone in Australian aviation a very happy Christmas and a successful and safe New Year.

Shane Carmody

New operational regulations made

The new flight operations Civil Aviation Safety Regulation Parts - covering the general operating and flight rules, air transport certification and governance, air transport operations for aeroplanes and rotorcraft and aerial work - were formally made in December 2018. The aerial work Part addresses the specialised operational requirements for aeroplanes and rotorcraft in this sector. These new Parts take effect from 25 March 2021. Comprehensive support and guidance material will be provided by CASA well before this date to ensure a smooth transition. The rules consolidate current safety requirements, reflect best international practices and address important safety issues.

One of the main aims of the reforms is to reduce the safety differences between charter and regular public transport operations, with requirements scaled to fit the size and complexity of operations. This means smaller air operators will not be required to adopt the same safety practices in the same way as the major airlines. The next step for CASA is to work with the Office of Parliamentary Counsel on the effective transitional and consequential arrangements for the new regulations and to deliver comprehensive support resources for the aviation community well before the regulations commence. There will be a suite of guidance material and sample manuals, as well as a plain English guide to the general operating and flight rules in Part 91. CASA has given a commitment to make the implementation of these new rules as straight forward as possible.

Find more details on Civil Aviation Safety Regulations Parts 91, 119, 121, 133,135 and 138.

Flight Safety Australia annual out now

The fourth annual printed edition of CASA’s Flight Safety Australia magazine is out now. The 2018 Flight Safety Australia Collectors' Edition is a bumper collection of more than 50 stories published in the online magazine during the year. This 144-page publication is packed with credible, informative and comprehensive aviation safety news and is great reading for everyone involved in Australian aviation. It includes feature articles, contributor and general articles, as well as a close-call section written by pilots who share their experiences in the name of safety. Featured topics include effective safety techniques, virtual reality, the Piper Alpha oil platform disaster and accident investigations using drones. Other topics covered include the hazards of wake turbulence, human performance and limitations, and the limitations of visual scanning.

Order your copy now.

GA maintenance regs open for comment

Details of the proposed new general aviation maintenance regulations have been released for comment. CASA is proposing to adopt the United States Federal Aviation Regulations Part 43 with as few changes as possible. Amendments will only be made to ensure compatibility with Australian legal terms, to clarify the US rules, for formatting reasons or to incorporate any policy differences that have been consulted with the general aviation community. The proposals will not introduce a new aircraft maintenance engineer licence. There are five key aspects to the new rules - maintenance organisation approvals, a new individual authorisation, phasing out Civil Aviation Regulation 30 approvals, annual or progressive aircraft inspections and options for current maintenance organisations. No maintenance organisation approval will be required for carrying out maintenance of general aviation aircraft, engines or components, other than propellers and instruments. This will apply to all aircraft not engaged in air transport operations. A licensed aircraft maintenance engineer (LAME) will be able to certify, carry out or supervise maintenance of aircraft, engines, components and systems within the scope of their licence. LAMEs will not be required to obtain type ratings to certify maintenance on type rated aircraft under the proposed regulations. Annual or progressive inspections will form an essential component in the management of airworthiness of an aircraft. The annual/progressive inspection will be carried out or supervised by an individual authorisation holder who will determine that the aircraft remains in conformity with its approved type design. Aircraft operating in flying training or aerial work will also be required to undergo 100-hour inspections. Large aeroplanes (above 5700kg) or multi-engine turbine powered aeroplanes will be required to use a manufacturers inspection program or a program approved by CASA.

Find out more about the proposed general aviation maintenance regulations and have your say before 31 January 2019.

Give feedback on frequency advice

Feedback is being sought on draft changes to guidance material for pilots on operations in the vicinity of non-controlled aerodromes. This follows CASA’s review of the appropriate radio frequency to use at or near non-controlled aerodromes. A Civil Aviation Advisory Publication is being updated to clarify guidance on radio use, which supports the continued use of common traffic advisory frequency procedures. Pilots in the vicinity of an aerodrome published on aeronautical charts should listen and broadcast as necessary on the common traffic advisory frequency. When aerodromes are located within a broadcast area pilots should listen and broadcast as necessary on the broadcast area frequency. In all other cases, it is recommended pilots listen and broadcast as necessary on the area VHF, noting a pilot has the discretion to use the most appropriate frequency to ensure safe operations. This may be MULTICOM 126.7 MHz. To ensure mutual traffic awareness, it is recommended that pilots using an alternative frequency also monitor area VHF. CASA will be providing additional information on the radio frequency issue before changes are made to the aeronautical information publication at the end of February 2019.

Comment before 16 January 2019 on the non-controlled aerodrome advisory.

Melbourne VFR route change

Pilots who operate in the Melbourne region should be aware of recent changes to a visual flight rules route. The change affects the Melbourne Port Philip Bay route. Class C airspace has been lowered from 2500 feet to 2000 feet under the approach and departure path for Runway 34 at Melbourne Tullamarine airport to accommodate a category 1 ground-based augmentation system landing system approach. This has required a change for visual flight rules pilots flying the coastal route between the Laverton BOM Tower and Carrum. Between Point Ormond and the Laverton BOM tower pilots should fly eastbound at 1500 feet and westbound at 2000 feet. Between Point Ormond and Carrum pilots should fly southbound at 1500 feet and northbound at 2500 feet. The changes took place on 28 November 2018. Recently issued charts will not be updated until May 2019, which means pilots must check NOTAMs and the AIP supplement before every flight. The airspace arrangements that came into effect on 28 November 2018 for the Melbourne Port Philip Bay route are a modification of earlier changes made to accommodate the lower Class C airspace. The new arrangements were agreed after consultation with the local aviation community, including the regional airspace and procedures advisory committee.

Get more information on the Melbourne VFR change.

Mustering helicopter engine issues

Intensive multi-agency work is underway to analyse and address engine performance issues affecting some helicopters operating in northern Australia. Premature exhaust valve and valve guide wear has been found in a number of R22 and R44 helicopters used predominately in mustering in northern Australia. In some cases, problems have emerged in less than 100 hours after inspection. CASA has been working with other government agencies and a diverse industry working group to identify the likely cause of the issue. The group is looking at a range of contributing factors including the way the helicopters are operated, fuel, carburetor set up and failure modes. This is a complex issue that requires usable data to assess possible causes and to date no definitive cause has been identified. With the assistance of the engine manufacturer Lycoming and helicopter operators seven engine monitoring devices are being fitted to mustering helicopters operated in northern Australia. The data collected by the devices will quickly provide detailed information on engine performance trends to allow a more comprehensive analysis of the issue. Based on the information currently available R22 and R44 helicopters remain safe to operate, providing they are flown within their operating limitations. This includes lowering peak combustion temperatures.

CASA has also issued an airworthiness bulletin on R22 and R44 engine intake valve and valve seat distress. This is caused by an intake valve deposit build-up which is likely occurring during extended ground operations in elevated ambient temperatures. A failure to observe adverse indications or unusual engine behaviour may result in an induction backfire, engine power loss and airframe yaw. In a severe event this could lead to several uncontrolled power and yaw reactions. CASA has made a number of recommendations to address this issue.

Read the R22/R44 engine intake valve bulletin.

Improving community service flight safety

A package of proposed new requirements to strengthen the safety of community service flights has been released for comment. CASA is proposing the new requirements to support pilots who conduct community service flights and to enhance public confidence in the services. The proposed requirements relate to pilot flight time experience, licensing and medicals, night operations and maintenance. In many cases pilots currently conducting community service flights will already meet the proposed requirements. However, CASA believes it is appropriate to formally set out these requirements as pilots carry out community service flights without the organisational structure and support provided by an air operator’s certificate. In particular, the requirements will mitigate potential operational pressures on community service flight pilots. These pressures are normally not found in ordinary private flights and can increase the likelihood of an incident. CASA has been working collaboratively with community service flight organisations to support the safety of operations.

Have your say now on proposed community service flight requirements.

Christmas shutdown

The festive season is here and that means CASA will be closed for regular business between Christmas and New Year. CASA offices will shut from 25 December 2018 to 1 January 2019 inclusive. All services will resume on Wednesday 2 January 2019. Anyone needing CASA services or support over the holiday period should contact CASA now. Applications for services lodged at the last minute are unlikely to be processed before the holiday shutdown. CASA will have staff on call for urgent aviation safety matters over the Christmas-New Year period. Anyone needing CASA for an urgent aviation safety matter during the holiday shutdown should call 131 757 and follow the prompts.

In brief

  • Consultation is open on revised proposed new fatigue management rules. An instrument is proposed to be made in 2019 that will apply to air operator's certificate holders, Part 141 certificate holders and some flight crew licence holders. Comment on the proposed fatigue changes by 10 February 2019.
  • A new printed edition of the very popular Visual Flight Rules Guide is now available. The guide features plenty of diagrams, charts and maps to support easy-to-read information on all visual flight rules operations. Get your copy now.
  • Changes have been made to the way CASA processes notifications about fireworks displays. These will now be managed centrally, rather than through CASA’s regional offices. To notify CASA of a fireworks display, please email fireworks@casa.gov.au. Find out more about the process of notifying CASA and applying for approval to conduct fireworks displays.
  • Candidates applying for a recreational pilot licence are being reminded they must pass either the recreational pilot licence (aeroplane) or recreational pilot licence (helicopter) exam. After 30 June 2019, CASA records must show a pass in these exams for a recreational pilot licence application to be processed. Passes for the old basic aeronautical knowledge exams do not satisfy the requirements for the issue of a recreational pilot licence.
  • An avsafety seminar for pilots is being held in Esperance on Friday 18 January 2019 at 18:30 at the Esperance Aero Club. The seminar will provide the latest information on communications, situational awareness and threat and error management. Book a place at the Esperance seminar now.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - November 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

Improving safety surveillance

Monitoring the ongoing health and maturity of aviation operations is one of CASA’s core responsibilities set out by the Civil Aviation Act. In a recent speech to the Australian Airports Association national conference I outlined the substantial improvements CASA has made in the way we deliver and conduct surveillance activities. The changes began with the introduction of sector risk profiles, which look at specific areas of operations and identify risks and risk impacts. These risk profiles are developed in collaboration with sector participants, as well as utilising information from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau and Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics. This year we established regular risk profiling for airspace that will soon be developed to include ongoing risk analysis for aerodromes. We have the capacity to conduct monthly surveillance risk profiling now, but we hope to increase that to a daily or weekly report soon.

In 2018 we established a national surveillance selection process. This is a systematic national approach to the prioritisation and scheduling of planned surveillance events across a year. In 2018-19 there are 1032 surveillance events planned across all areas of CASA’s responsibilities. In addition, we are conducting national sector campaigns, which are coordinated activities of sample surveillance of certain sectors. One example was a recent balloon sector campaign triggered by several accidents, which saw 11 of the 23 balloon operators audited. CASA now applies a risk management and consistent approach to surveillance. This means we allocate our resources more efficiently and effectively and take a more holistic approach to aviation safety.

Of course, compliance checking is only a small part of delivering a safe aviation environment. Support, guidance, honesty and transparency are at least as important to deliver a safe outcome. We must engage and collaborate with the aviation community and look to reduce costs and impost on industry where ever possible.

Please read my speech to the Australian Airports Association.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

New Visual Flight Rules Guide out now

A new printed edition of the very popular Visual Flight Rules Guide is now available. The guide features plenty of diagrams, charts and maps to support easy-to-read information on all visual flight rules operations. This new edition has updates to the rules and regulations and incorporates feedback received from the aviation community since the release of the 2015 edition. Included in the latest edition is information on the new fuel rules, reforms to aviation medicals, streamlined information on the National Aeronautical Information Processing System or NAIPS and substantial amendments to the Graphical Area Forecasts section and inclusion of Grid Point Wind and Temperature forecasts. Pilots are given practical examples for calculating important data such as usable fuel and the beginning of first light. Text has been updated in a range of areas to make content clearer and easier to read. The Visual Flight Rules Guide is divided into five main sections – general information, pre-flight planning, operations, helicopters and emergency procedures. This easy-to-use guide on how to operate safely to the visual flight rules is allowed to be used in private pilot licence examinations as a reference tool and is a very useful resource during all visual flight rules operations. It is one of a number of resources CASA produces to assist pilots to comply with the regulations and fly safely.

Order your copy of the Visual Flight Rules Guide from the CASA online store.

Go to the online version of the Visual Flight Rules Guide.

Have your say on new GA maintenance regs

The next phase of consultation on the proposed general aviation maintenance regulations is about to get underway. To help people interested in the development of the new rules CASA is commencing a series of information sessions in early December 2018. The sessions will be held at Moorabbin, Parafield, Archerfield, Cairns, Darwin, Jandakot and Bankstown. The CASA team working on the general aviation maintenance regulations will explain what is proposed and why, as well as giving everyone a chance to ask questions and make suggestions. The United States maintenance regulations are to be used as the basis for Australia’s new general aviation maintenance rules. This was determined after initial consultation held earlier in 2018. The next phase of consultation will focus on the practical issues of adopting the US Federal Aviation Regulations into the Australian rules. CASA’s goal is to streamline maintenance requirements, minimise the regulatory burden and reduce costs, while maintaining the high aviation standards expected by all Australians.

Book a place at a general aviation maintenance information sessions.

Facts and figures show busy year

Australia’s registered aircraft fleet grew to 15,529 by the end of the 2017-18 financial year – up 422 on the previous year. There were 3720 new flight crew licences issued, bringing the total number of current licences to 31,145 at the end of June 2018. These are just some of the key facts contained in CASA’s latest annual report. Over the year CASA processed 51,942 flight crew licensing applications and notifications and 4146 people received their first medical certificate. There were 3020 remote pilot licences issued, an increase of 53 per cent on the previous year, and 332 new remotely piloted aircraft operator certificates were issued, an increase of 27 per cent on the year before. During the year CASA conducted 1121 surveillance events and 813 on-site visits by aviation safety advisors. A total of 7913 people attended AvSafety seminars and other educational events. There were 149 aviation infringement notices issued – 58 for drone offences and 49 for breaches by airline passengers. In the annual report CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said the 2017-18 year saw a focus on consultation, significant progress on simplifying aviation medical processes and ongoing challenges associated with remotely piloted aircraft.

Go to the 2017-18 CASA annual report.

Drone battery failure warning

A warning has been issued to operators of DJI Matrice 200 series and DJI Inspire 2 drones. A small number of incidents have been reported where these drones have suffered a complete loss of power during flight, despite indications there was enough battery power. In each case the drones made a rapid descent due to an immediate loss of lift; with the remote pilot unable to maintain any command authority. The drones crashed and suffered damage on impact, but no reports of injury or significant third-party property damage have been received. An investigation by the manufacturer has found the problem is not related to specific firmware but is thought to be related to battery models TB50 and TB55. In a safety bulletin CASA recommends operators of DJI drones fitted with TB50 and TB55 batteries do not fly over people at any height until further notice. CASA has highlighted the need for all drone operators and remote pilots to ensure that any operation can be conducted safely. Civil Aviation Safety Regulations require that a drone is not operated in a way that poses a hazard to another aircraft, person or property.

Read the drone safety bulletin and the DJI notice.

More security for medical applications

Online security for users of CASA’s medical records system is being improved. From 29 November 2018 a new applicant authentication process will be part of the system. Each time a medical certificate applicant accesses the system they will be required to generate a 6-character alphanumeric code by clicking on the “Get SMS Code” button. The code will be sent to the mobile number applicants have already registered with CASA. The applicant will be required to enter the SMS code to proceed with the medical certificate application. The SMS code requirement is similar to one used by internet banking websites to confirm a user’s identity.

Find out more about aviation medicals.

Effective GA passenger safety briefings

Detailed guidance on how to deliver effective passenger safety briefings in general aviation operations has been released. The guidance material covers aeroplanes, helicopters and hot air balloons. The rules require all passengers to be given a safety briefing before take-off, to be made familiar with the location of emergency exits and equipment, to be informed about the stowage and security of loose articles and the need for aisles, passageways and exits to be clear of obstructions. The pilot-in-command should conduct the passenger briefing prior to engine start where possible. The type of operation dictates what sort of briefing will be conducted, with issues to be covered including seat belts, doors, brace position and the need not to distract the pilot during take-off, manoeuvring or landing. Helicopter briefings can include approaching and leaving to the side or front of the aircraft in a crouched position and never by the rear of the helicopter, carrying tools horizontally below waist level and never upright or over the shoulder or above the head, holding firmly onto hats and loose articles, and approaching and leaving by the downslope side for rotor clearance. Hot air balloon briefings should cover entering and exiting the basket, precautions with the inflation fan and a detailed explanation of the passenger landing position.

Get all the details on passenger safety briefings.

‘Umbrella’ air operator arrangements

CASA has become aware that some aviation companies are using their air operator’s certificate in an ‘umbrella’ arrangement for other aviation companies. The holders of air operator’s certificates and other authorisations are allowing other companies to conduct operations under their certificate. CASA considers this is a breach of the Civil Aviation Act and/or regulations by both the certificate holder and the company which does not hold a certificate.

Paragraph seven of CASA’s aviation ruling on franchise air operator certificate arrangements states: “the air operator certificate holder at all times remains responsible for the actions of another person (not being a reference to a company) conducting operations under the air operator’s certificate”. The ruling does not permit an air operator’s certificate holder to enter into an arrangement for a third-party company to conduct operations under its air operator’s certificate. This principle applies to other authorisation types. The ruling is not affected or altered by arrangements where the companies have an affiliation, common directorship or shareholders; the non-certificate company uses the procedures of the certificate company; or the non-certificate company is supervised by the certificate company. Companies are advised to ensure their operations are conducted lawfully and they are encouraged to seek written advice from CASA about these types of arrangements.

Read the franchise air operator certificate ruling.

Christmas shutdown

The festive season is fast approaching and that means CASA will be closed for regular business between Christmas and New Year. CASA offices will shut from the close of business on Monday 24 December 2018 until the start of business on Wednesday 2 January 2019. Anyone needing CASA services or support over the holiday period should make contact as soon as possible. Applications for services lodged at the last minute are unlikely to be able to be processed before the holiday season. CASA will have staff on call for urgent aviation safety matters over the Christmas-New Year period. Anyone needing CASA for an urgent aviation safety matter during the holiday shutdown should call 131 757 and follow the prompts.

In Brief

  • A quick guide to the new fuel rules that started on 8 November 2018 is now available. The guide can be printed from CASA’s website and covers the key changes such as in-flight fuel management, fixed fuel reserves, mayday fuel and additional fuel calculation.
  • proposed airworthiness directive on tail boom and fin fretting and cracking in Bell UH-1 helicopters has been released for comment. The UH-1 Helicopters will require inspections.
  • A new online resource is now available for pilots operating in northern Australia during the wet season. A video on wet season decision making looks at the hazards and challenges of flying in the tropics during the wet and features advice from the Bureau of Meteorology and a Darwin based flight training organisation.
  • CASA will draft new rules for the maintenance of limited category aircraft following strong support for the proposal. The draft rules will incorporate amendments suggested during the latest consultation. Results of consultation have been published.

CASA: October regulatory wrap-up [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


October regulatory wrap-up

Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Consultations

Frequency use a low level in Class G airspace

We have published the Summary of Consultation detailing the feedback and our response to the frequency use in Class G airspace public consultation. An education campaign will be rolled out to address key issues raised in the consultation.

Proposed policy for maintenance of limited category aircraft (Subpart 132.M)

The Summary of Consultation on the proposed policy for maintenance of limited category aircraft (Subpart 132.M) has been published. Overall, respondents have strongly supported the proposed Subpart 132.M of CASR. A draft of the legislation will be published for further comment prior to finalisation.

New draft drone rules

Public consultation on new draft rules for commercial or professional drone operations closes on 18 November 2018. The proposed rules cover a range of issues including training, extended visual line of sight operations, recordkeeping and notification requirements and operations in controlled airspace.

Passenger Safety Information guidelines

In October, we consulted on a new version of Civil Aviation Advisory Publication (CAAP) 253-02 - Passenger safety information: Guidelines on content and standard of safety information to be provided to passengers by aircraft operators. Consultation has now closed, but you can still view the new draft CAAP on the Consultation Hub.

Proposed changes to general aviation maintenance regulations

Consultation on the proposal to develop new GA maintenance regulations modelled on those in place in the United States is imminent. We have also published the Summary of Consultation detailing feedback from the first round of consultation that closed in August 2018.

Announcements

New minimum fuel rules

New fuel rules come into force on 8 November 2018 for all pilots and operators – except those able to operate under a recent exemption. These are AOC and Part 141 certificate holders with a certificate in force as of 7 November 2018, who must comply by 28 February 2019. Visit the CASA website.

Instruments

Revised CAO 20.91 instrument

Changes to the CAO 20.91 instrument have been made and came into force on 2 November. Operators who validate Required Navigation Performance Authorisation Required (RNP AR) procedures can take advantage of revised data validation requirements. It removes the need for exemptions for individual operators, including exemptions that expired on 30 September 2018.

Guidance material

Minor amendments to RPT SMS

We have published a revised CAAP SMS-01 v1.1 - Safety management systems for regular public transport operations. It includes minor amendments to accurately reflect CASA’s formally endorsed definition of ‘Just Culture’.

 

CASA Urgent Safety Message [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

**Urgent Safety Message**

2 November 2018

Dear RPA operator and/or remote pilot,

Please find attached a Safety Bulletin:
https://mailinglist.casa.gov.au/lists/lt.php?tid=kmlhOxvgsaSXIcbbu4aiwqYOHGMkXV71uZGgH2gyqqXXDhfKaYGsM6pGtu6jYXKH
regarding DJI battery models TB50 and TB55 for your immediate attention.

Sincerely

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Branch
Civil Aviation Safety Authority


CASA Briefing Newsletter - October 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


The CASA Briefing - October 2018

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

Survey finds satisfaction with CASA improving

We have just released the results of our second survey to evaluate the health of CASA's relationship with the aviation community. I am pleased to advise that aviation community satisfaction with the performance of CASA has risen markedly since the 2015 survey. This is the result of a lot of hard work right across our organisation, led by a clear focus from management on getting results that benefit everyone in aviation. The 2018 survey has given CASA an overall satisfaction rating of 6.2 out of 10, up from 4.2 in the same survey conducted in 2015. This means a total of 53 per cent of people taking part in the survey said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their relationship with CASA. Satisfaction with CASA's service delivery has risen to a rating of 6.2 compared to 3.8 in the previous survey, satisfaction with audits and compliance is up to 6.3 from 4.8 and satisfaction with development of regulations is up to 5.5 from 3. All key ratings have risen in the 2018 survey, including ease of complying with regulations which is now rated at 5.9 and CASA seeking to promote safety best practice which is rated at 6.7.

The survey, conducted by research organisation Colmar Brunton, canvassed the views of more than 1100 aviation industry participants. Respondents gave the highest ratings to CASA for respecting confidentiality, having safety as its primary focus and sharing information and knowledge willingly. High ratings were also given for CASA having competent and capable staff and being efficient in dealings with people. Clearly this survey shows CASA has come a long way in a relatively short time, but I recognise there is most certainly still much room for improvement. The survey found there is more work to be done to make regulations simpler, clearer and more practical and to deliver even more effective consultation. There continues to be a strong message that CASA must do more to be consistent in applying regulations. Across all stakeholder groups there is a desire for us to work with the aviation community to facilitate safe outcomes, rather than telling people how safety is to be achieved. I can assure everyone that we are listening to these concerns and will continue to work to make effective improvements. Future surveys will be conducted to make sure we are realistically measuring our performance and have benchmarks we can strive to exceed. I would like to thank everyone in aviation who took part in the survey.

You can read the full report of the survey findings.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Latest news

Action on low level frequency use

A range of actions are being taken to help pilots better manage frequency use at low levels in class G airspace. This follows extensive consultation with the aviation community on the appropriate VHF frequencies to use in the vicinity of aerodromes in class G. After exploring options for change and considering all feedback, CASA believes the safest and simplest system is the one currently in place. There are three elements to this system. The first relates to non-controlled aerodromes which are published on aeronautical charts. In the vicinity of these aerodromes pilots should use the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) as published. This can be a discrete frequency or 126.7 MHz. The vicinity of the aerodrome is 10 nautical miles and at a height where operations could conflict with other traffic. The second element relates to broadcast areas, where pilots should use the dedicated broadcast area CTAF. The third element is all other non-controlled airspace, where pilots should be on the area VHF frequency.

CASA will be encouraging the operators of uncharted aerodromes to arrange for details of their aerodromes to be added to the aeronautical charts. CASA will also work with Airservices Australia to increase the number of aerodromes displayed on the visual aeronautical charts by adding all aerodromes that currently have an International Civil Aviation Organization four-letter identifier. In addition, CASA will use Regional Airspace and Procedures Advisory Committees to identify busy aerodromes currently using 126.7MHz and ascertain whether a discrete frequency would be appropriate. CASA will develop and deliver a safety education campaign on recommended radio frequencies for non-controlled airspace and new guidance for efficient and effective radio calls. The aim will be to make sure the procedures are easy to follow, and pilots are correctly following the advice for safe operations. The Aeronautical Information Publication and a Civil Aviation Advisory Publication will be changed to consolidate and clarify the policy on frequency use in low level class G airspace.

Get more information on low level frequencies on CASA's consultation hub.

GA maintenance regs to be based on US model

New general aviation maintenance regulations will be modelled on those in place in the United States. The decision to use the US model follows public consultation on options for the development of specific general aviation maintenance regulations. CASA issued a discussion paper on the issue in August 2018. There were 89 responses from aviation representative organisations, maintenance and training organisations, recreational flying and charter operators, maintenance engineers, pilots and private aircraft owners. All responses identified issues with the existing regulations and indicated support for change to a simpler and more understandable set of rules. Sixty-three responses indicated support for adopting a set of rules from another jurisdiction, with 78 per cent supporting the US and 11 per cent New Zealand. A technical working group established by the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel has reviewed the consultation feedback and agreed with adopting the US model. This is seen as having the potential to deliver the best outcomes in cost savings to the aviation community, while at the same time ensuring an appropriate level of safety is achieved. More information on the proposal to base the new general aviation maintenance regulations on the US model will be released soon, with an opportunity to provide further feedback.

Read the results of the consultation on general aviation maintenance regulations.

New fuel rules about to start

New fuel rules come into effect on 8 November 2018. Pilots must comply with the new fuel rules from that date unless they fly for an organisation that holds an air operator's certificate or a flying training organisation with a Part 141 certificate. Part 141 certificate holders deliver non-integrated, single pilot licence and rating training. Existing air operator and Part 141 certificate holders have until 28 February 2019 to comply with the new rules. This extra time recognises that many operators were only recently required to amend their expositions or operations manuals to transition to new training regulations. The new fuel requirements will now require a review of current fuel policies and a potential update to operations manuals. The changes to the fuel rules will enhance aviation safety, remove uncertainty between rules and guidance material and better reflect industry views and international standards for fuel requirements. Key changes include re-introducing a fixed fuel reserve requirement, reducing reserve requirements for day visual flight rules operations in small piston or turboprop aeroplanes and requiring pilots to conduct in-flight fuel management with regular fuel quantity checks. Under the new rules a declaration of 'Mayday Fuel' needs to be broadcast if required. 'Mayday Fuel' is not aimed at setting conditions to take regulatory action against pilots or operators and a declaration does not automatically mean emergency services will be mobilised.

Find out more about the new fuel rules.

New approach to airworthiness directives

CASA has changed its approach to notifying the aviation community about important airworthiness directives. This new approach gives a clearer indication of the urgency of airworthiness directives. CASA will now only classify airworthiness directives as urgent if they have been designated as emergency airworthiness directives by the national aviation authority that has issued the directive. Where the issuing authority does not have an emergency classification CASA will use compliance time to determine if the directive is urgent. An urgent classification will be given to directives with compliance of less than 25 hours' time in service, or 25 flight cycles, or 30 calendar days. Where possible CASA will still send urgent airworthiness directives to the operators of affected aircraft, engines or aeronautical products. For direct communication to be successful it is critical that registered aircraft operators keep their contact details in the CASA aircraft registration system up to date. It is also strongly recommended that aircraft operators subscribe to the certification and airworthiness list in the CASA email notification service. This ensures an email will be received each time CASA publishes an urgent airworthiness directive.

Subscribe now to CASA information emails.

Send questions to: airworthiness.directives@casa.gov.au.

Cordless drill warning

There has been a warning about the use of cordless electric tools during aircraft maintenance. This follows a US Federal Aviation Administration report of a fatal hanger accident involving a brush-type cordless drill. An explosion and fire erupted when an aircraft maintainer loosened a fuel panel on a Cessna 414 from which the fuel had not been drained. It was not clear whether the explosion and fire occurred when fuel began to escape, or when the maintainer attempted to replace the panel screws. An FAA presentation says: "We can only speculate that maybe he was distracted and attempted to remove the fuel panel by mistake; all the underwing panels look the same on this aircraft and the fuel panels are not placarded." Brush-type electric motors make and break electrical connections mechanically, which can produce sparks and electrical 'noise'. The FAA stresses the need to use brushless tools certified as suitable for use in hazardous environments such as aviation. Brushless motors use electronic rather than mechanical switching, and thus avoid the risk of sparking.

Aim for the best cabin crew training

Detailed guidance on the best way to manage and deliver training and checking for cabin crew has been published. A new cabin safety bulletin provides information on the selection of cabin crew training and checking personnel, the responsibilities of training managers, training program development and outsourcing training and checking. Air operators are required to provide a training and checking organisation to ensure the competency of operating crews. Each operator must appoint their chief pilot or a training and checking manager as a person who has responsibility for the management of the training and checking organisation. Additionally, there must be a sufficient number of suitably qualified and experienced training and checking personnel to ensure that all training programs, examinations and proficiency checks can be undertaken satisfactorily. Depending on the category of operations, additional personnel may be sourced from an external organisation or be required to be in the full-time employment of the operator. Operators should document the process for managing external training and checking.

Read the training and checking cabin safety bulletin.

Melanie wins first memorial scholarship

Aspiring South Australian flight instructor Melanie Cummins has been awarded the inaugural Stephen Guerin scholarship. CASA established the scholarship to honour the memory of flying operations inspector Stephen Guerin, who lost his life in an aircraft accident near Renmark in May 2017. He was observing a check flight being conducted by an air operator as part of routine safety work undertaken by CASA. Two other pilots lost their lives in the accident. The $15,000 a year scholarship is offered to current and prospective professional pilots in South Australia. Melanie Cummins has been flying for 16 years and is currently working for Australian Aerial Services. In her application for the scholarship she said her goal was always to become an instructor and the financial support will be used to further her flying skills with an additional rating and endorsement. Melanie is active in the Port Lincoln Flying Club, assisting with safety related events and education. CASA's CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said Melanie's proactive attitude to aviation safety made her a stand out candidate for the scholarship. "Melanie's approach to aviation reflects that of Stephen Guerin - passionate about flying and keen to give back to the community."

Find out more about the Stephen Guerin scholarship.

In brief:

The latest round in CASA's sponsorship program is open until 16 November 2018. CASA is looking to support organisations raising awareness of aviation safety in line with CASA's safety promotion activities and priorities.

  • An airworthiness bulletin has been issued warning search and rescue and emergency medical services about potential dangers with rescue equipment. Certain winch hook and personnel carrying device systems can inadvertently release people during rescues, particularly during retrievals from water.
  • Comment on the proposed manual of standards for the regulations covering remotely piloted aircraft systems before 18 November 2018. The standards cover a range of issues including training, extended visual line of sight operations, recordkeeping and notification requirements and operations in controlled airspace.
  • A summary of feedback to consultation on minor changes to the Part 66 manual of standards has been published on CASA's consultation hub. CASA will proceed with the amendments, with some variations. Part 66 covers maintenance personnel licensing.

November pilot safety seminars

CASA's latest AvSafety seminars focus on developing pilot skills in three key areas - communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. A practical scenario is used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In November 2018 seminars are being held at:

  • Albany
  • Jandakot
  • Canberra
  • Bankstown
  • Parafield
  • Bendigo
  • Emerald
  • Longreach
  • Mt Gambier
  • Naracoorte
  • Warnervale
  • Bunbury
  • Ballarat
  • Murray Bridge.

Book a place at your local AvSafety seminar.

November seminars for engineers

CASA's engineering safety seminars cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. The seminars are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and maintenance training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. Engineering seminars in November 2018 are at:

  • Horn Island
  • Hobart
  • Devonport.

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.


 

RPAS Recreation Category - Risk Register for industry feedback [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Members,

For your information:


UNCLASSIFIED



Please find attached:

RPAS Recreation Category - Risk Register for industry feedback [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

 the RPAS SRP risk register for Recreation sub sector operations. Following the CASA /Industry workshops  held at CASA Office Sydney  from  25-28 June 2018, the document was reviewed internally and is now available to the workshop participants for feedback .

 

The risk register includes the following worksheets -

 

  • Worksheet 1 - RPAS Sector Classification  - This is the sector classification used to scope the RPAS Sector Risk Profile
  • Worksheet 2 - Objectives - This contains a list of 7 Sector Objectives developed in the workshops
  • Worksheet 3 - Risk Matrix - Used to assign the Likelihood ,  Consequence and Rating (to be reviewed by RPAS sector in the next phase of the risk management project)
  • Worksheet 4 - Risk Register  - The risk register developed in the workshops has been reviewed internally and open for comments. Please provide your comments and feedback in the space provided (Column X)

 

 

 

Please review the draft risk register and provide your comments by COB  31 October 2018.

 

 

Please note that the risk register  is for review only and should not be used for any other purposes.

 

Thanks and kind regards

 

Coordination and Safety Systems

CASA\ Aviation Group


www.casa.gov.au

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Frequency use in Class G airspace summary of consultation published [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


Frequency use in Class G airspace summary of consultation published

We have published the Summary of Consultation (SOC) detailing the feedback and our response to the frequency use in Class G airspace public consultation.

Outcome on radio procedures for low level airspace

We have carefully reviewed the feedback received throughout consultation on the issue of radio frequency use in uncontrolled airspace, which has helped shape the way forward.

Feedback on proposal –126.7 MHz at uncharted aerodromes

Feedback on the second proposal – to allow 126.7 MHz in the circuit at uncharted aerodromes – confirmed a preference among some sectors to use 126.7 MHz in non-controlled airspace. While 58 per cent did not believe the proposal introduced issues of safety or practicality, of the 42 per cent that did, almost half suggested the proposal would introduce complexities and confusion.

Issues highlighted in consultation

Feedback throughout consultation highlighted a range of issues that currently exist around radio use in non-controlled (Class G) airspace, and issues that could be introduced with a change to radio frequency procedures.

The main issues raised by respondents have been:

  • uncertainty on procedures for inbound calls if frequency boundaries change
  • radio congestion and clutter
  • workload issues with frequency changes, especially for sport and recreational aircraft
  • confusion over the concept of ‘uncharted aerodromes’ and calls for these to be added to the maps
  • concerns about too little or two much communication, and inconsistency of terminology between IFR and VFR pilots
  • concerns about decreased situational awareness with different frequencies in use in the same airspace
  • concern there is a low level of awareness around the correct radio procedures.

Next steps

After exploring options for change and considering all feedback, we believe the safest and simplest system is the one currently in place. In other words, the recommended radio frequency to use in non-controlled airspace are:

  • ‘in the vicinity’—within 10nm, and at a height where your operations could be in the way of other traffic—of any non-controlled aerodrome published on aeronautical charts, pilots should use the CTAF (126.7 MHz or discrete frequency) as published
  • anywhere within a Broadcast Area, pilots should use the dedicated Broadcast Area CTAF
  • in all other non-controlled airspace, pilots should be on Area VHF.

Instead, we will focus on addressing the issues raised in consultation through an education and communication campaign, rather than through a policy change.

We are working closely with Airservices Australia to increase the number of charted aerodromes on the visual aeronautical charts (WAC, VTC and VNC) to provide better situational awareness for pilots.

We intend to make some editorial changes to consolidate and clarify the radio use guidance in the Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP) and the Civil Aviation Advisory Publication – CAAP 166-01. We anticipate consulting publicly on the amendments to CAAP 166-01 during November 2018.

We will also release a suite of new safety education products and information and promote these widely. The products will contain guidance and reminders about using the radio safely and effectively in non-controlled airspace.

A safety education campaign will be rolled out in the coming months.

 

CASA: September regulatory wrap-up [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

September regulatory wrap-up

Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Instruments

New fatigue transition dates

As part of our response to the independent review of the fatigue rules, we have announced new transition dates. High capacity regular public transport operators are required to transition to CAO 48.1 by 30 September 2019 and all other air operators by 26 March 2020. The deadline for operators to transition by 31 October 2018 no longer applies. View the amendment instrument on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Drug and alcohol management plans

We published a legislative instrument with two exemptions that make it easier for organisations with a drug and alcohol management plan (DAMP) to contract other DAMP organisations or emergency services organisations when required. View the instrument on the CASA website.

Part 61 Manual of Standards updated

The Part 61 Manual of Standards (MOS) master document has been updated so that the latest changes are now in one place. View the latest MOS on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Exemptions

CAR 234 Fuel requirements exemption

Existing AOC and Part 141 certificate holders have more time to comply with the new fuel requirements under a new exemption.

You will now have until 28 February 2019 to comply with the requirements of the CAR 234 amendment and CASA Instrument 29/18 (the Fuel Instrument).

Private pilots are required to comply with the new rules from 8 November 2018. Guidance material is available on the CASA website.

Consultations

Proposed Part 101 Drones Manual of Standards

We're seeking public feedback on new draft rules for commercial or professional drone operations. Visit the Consultation Hub to provide your feedback by 18 November 2018.

Part 149 Manual of Standards

We have opened consultation on the Part 149 Manual of Standards (MOS) for approved self-administering aviation organisations (ASAOs). You can view the draft Part 149 MOS and provide your feedback in the Consultation Hub until 21 October 2018.

Amendments to the Part 66 Manual of Standards

We published a summary of feedback to our consultation on minor changes to the Part 66 Manual of Standards (MOS) on the Consultation Hub.

Guidance material

Fatigue guidance material

We have updated the fatigue operations manual supplement templates associated with CAAP 48-1 to reflect new transition dates and correct some editorial errors. Additional changes will be developed to support forthcoming amendments to the rules. View the guidance materials on the CASA website.

Approved maintenance training organisations

The advisory circular for approved Part 147 training organisations has been updated to add new organisations, remove expired organisations and make minor amendments to course information. View AC 147-02v5.14 on the CASA website.

Announcements

Cheaper ADS-B on the way

We have listened to the aviation community and will be developing rule changes aimed at making it cheaper and easier for automatic dependent surveillance—broadcast (ADS-B) technology to be voluntarily fitted to visual flight rules aircraft. More information is in the media release.

CASA response to independent fatigue review

We have published a report outlining our response to the independent review of the fatigue rules. Following extensive public consultation, CASA has accepted 21 of the 24 review recommendations. Read the report and find out more about our plan for responding to the review recommendations on our website.

Licensing regulations transition complete

The four-year transition period for the new flight crew licensing and training regulations was completed at the end of August 2018 with 242 flying training organisations approved during the transition period. SeeCASA Briefing for more information.

 

UAVFUTURES drones changed my life Competition.

Members,

For your information:

UAVFUTURES drones changed my life - The positive change FPV drones had on my life was the catalyst to why I started Uavfutures in the first place. With A lot of misinformed negativity about FPV drone racing it is time we band together and show the public how awesome and life-changing this hobby really is. There have been countless emails from subscribers about how fpv changed their lives, even saved their lives so lets make a public push to get these amazing stories out there. THE WINNING VIDEO GETS THE ULTIMATE PRIZE OF 1 x fatshark HDO FPV goggle -
http://bit.ly/fatsharkHDO 1 x tbs tango with Cross fire TX and RX - http://bit.ly/TBStango 1 x BNF armattan rooster - http://bit.ly/roosterBNF5 The uavfutures drones changed my life comp official rules Official Rules 1. Your video must be submitted to the discord thread https://discord.gg/pnGdeEG before november 1st. 2. Your video must be public on youtube.com 3. Judges ruling is final and will me made up of a panel of judges. 4. Each video will be scored with the Score Rubric For “Drones changed my life” linked in this document - https://docs.google.com/document/d/1c... 5. The highest scoring video is the winner and will receive a fatshark HDO goggle, tbs tango radio with crossfire set up and armattan PNP rooster. 6. Video Entry titles must contain the phrase “drones changed my life” 7. You agree to allowing your video entry to be showcased on uavfutures youtube channel 8. Your video description must contain the following so just copy paste this part below into your video description. “Competition video at UAVFUTURES https://youtu.be/e8FNhUdRYis , Thanks to fatshark for providing the amazing prize of HDO’s - http://bit.ly/fatsharkHDO , To Team Black Sheep for their awesome Tango and Crossfire system http://bit.ly/TBStango and Armattan for their lifetime warranty tough rooster drones - http://bit.ly/roosterBNF5 “ Youtube is in no way affiliated with this competition.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - September 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

Cheaper ADS-B on the way

CASA has listened to the aviation community and will be developing rule changes aimed at making it cheaper and easier for automatic dependent surveillance—broadcast (ADS-B) technology to be voluntarily fitted to visual flight rules aircraft. This action follows consultation which showed broad support for the voluntary adoption of ADS-B across general aviation. The consultation made it clear the installation of ADS-B in the visual flight rules aircraft fleet should remain voluntary and CASA accepts this position. The challenge has been to find the right solutions and incentives that will encourage the fitting of ADS-B while maintaining an acceptable level of safety. CASA is proposing to adjust the equipment and installation standards to achieve these outcomes.

A mechanism will be established to classify the installation of ADS-B equipment in smaller type-certificated aircraft as a minor modification – not requiring an approval. For non-type certificated aircraft - including amateur home-built and sports aviation aircraft - owners and operators will be able to install ADS-B avionics that is compliant with a relevant ADS-B technical standard, but without necessarily being authorised under that standard. Installation of this equipment would be allowable under self-administration arrangements.

The solutions we are proposing genuinely reflect the preferences and ideas from the aviation community, including avionics manufacturers and installers. We see this as a sensible and practical solution for the visual flight rules community to ensure technology that makes the skies safer is available and more affordable. There will be further consultation on the detail of the proposed rule changes before they are finalised and implemented.

Read the feedback on the ADS-B consultation at CASA’s consultation hub.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Latest news

Staged transition to new fatigue rules

A staged approach is being taken to the transition to new fatigue rules for Australian aviation. High capacity regular public transport operators will transition to the new fatigue rules by 30 September 2019. All other air operators will need to move to the new fatigue requirements by 26 March 2020. This follows the adoption by CASA of most of the recommendations made in an independent review of the fatigue rules. CASA accepted the recommendations after extensive public consultation, as well as consideration of advice from the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel and an industry technical working group. The review and subsequent consultation have also resulted in a number of changes to the fatigue requirements and the way they are to be implemented. These include a revision of flight duty periods to align more closely to international averages, a better approach to approving and monitoring fatigue risk management systems, improved guidance on flight and duty time limits and fatigue risk management systems, a sample fatigue risk management system manual and examples of acceptable means of compliance. CASA has committed to ongoing monitoring of fatigue data and international practices to inform any future changes and will scrutinise the transition to the new rules to determine if any further improvements are needed. CASA’s Board is satisfied the fatigue changes strike an appropriate balance between safety and impact on the aviation community.

Find out more about the fatigue changes.

We listen to flight rules feedback

A number of changes are being made to the proposed general operating and flight rules following an analysis of responses to consultation. CASA issued the proposed Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations in March 2018 for broad consultation and received 116 responses. There was majority support for the proposed package of regulations, with feedback on specific items indicating a need for some amendments. CASA intends to make Part 91 in the fourth quarter of 2018, followed by the making of the Part 91 manual of standards in early 2019. The rules will commence in March 2021. Changes are now being made to a range of proposed provisions. The fitness-for-duty rule is being amended to reinstate the eight-hour rule and add a prescriptive blood alcohol level requirement. Amendments are being made to the cruising level requirements from 1000 ft to 1500 ft above ground level to provide appropriate alleviation in the reduction of the above mean sea level height from the current 5000 ft to 3000 ft above mean sea level. The requirements for taking off and landing into the wind at non-controlled aerodromes are being changed to permit cross wind training. Existing requirements for the carriage of passengers in experimental amateur-built aircraft will continue without the need for further approval. The flight instrument equipment requirements for experimental amateur-built aircraft are being changed to clarify the approval process so it is not more onerous or complex. It is also being made clear aircraft operated under the visual flight rules are not required to be fitted with or display anti-collision lights or navigation lights.

Get full details on Part 91 consultation responses.

Licensing regulations transition complete

The four-year transition period for the new flight crew licensing and training regulations was completed at the end of August 2018. This means old flight crew licences and authorisations are no longer valid and all active pilots have converted their licences to new Part 61 Civil Aviation Safety Regulation licences. Pilots who have not been active can still convert their licence at any time when required. Flight training organisations have moved to Part 141 and 142 approvals. On 1 September 2018 there were 242 flying training organisations with these approvals. CASA’s CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said despite the challenges of transition an enormous amount of work was been delivered on time. “It is a remarkable achievement that couldn’t have happened without the efforts of the aviation community. I appreciate the commitment to the transition by flying training organisations who were asked to do this work on top of their usual business. I particularly want to thank people who contributed through participation in the Part 61 solutions taskforce and the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel. Issues with the new regulations were addressed and improvements made where appropriate. We will continue to work on improvements to the flight crew licensing regulations and the Part 61 manual of standards, including incorporating the intent of current exemptions and approvals.”

Find out more about the licensing regulations.

Wet season safety for top end pilots

It’s time to focus on the coming wet season across the top end of the nation. To help pilots stay safe during the wet CASA is holding a special safety seminar in Darwin in October 2018. The free seminar will focus on pilot decision making relevant to flying in the wet season across northern Australia. There will be discussion about key issues such as aircraft and pilot limitations, weather forecasts and air traffic control services. CASA subject matter experts will be joined by representatives from the Bureau of Metrology and Defence air traffic control. The ‘Weather to fly – wet season decision making’ seminar will help pilots of all qualifications and levels of experience operate safely during the coming months. The seminar is an ideal opportunity to learn, ask questions of CASA and discuss local aviation safety issues. It is being held on Wednesday 24 October 2018 from 18:30 to 20:30 at the Novotel Darwin Airport, 2 Sir Norman Brearley Drive, Darwin Airport. CASA is planning to release an online video presentation based on the seminar for pilots who cannot attend the Darwin event.

Book your place now at the Darwin wet season safety seminar.

Lithium battery cabin safety

Advice for air operators and cabin crew on managing lithium battery risks has been released. It is estimated the average Australian passenger travels with up to six electronic devices powered by lithium batteries during each flight. A new cabin safety bulletin covers the management of an in-flight lithium battery fire, including the actions to be taken by cabin crew. Lithium batteries can overheat, ignite and release noxious gases. Problems can be caused by electrical shorting, rapid discharge, overcharging, a manufacturing defect, poor design or damage such as crushing or dropping. Overheating results in a process called “thermal runaway”, which is a reaction within the battery causing internal temperatures and pressure to rise at a quicker rate than can be dissipated. While the carriage and use of electronic devices with lithium batteries is not an overwhelming risk to flight safety there are potential risks, particularly if devices cannot be easily and quickly accessed. The cabin safety bulletin says appropriate crew training is an important mitigating factor in preventing lithium battery incidents. Operators should also have documented procedures in their operations manuals available to flight, cabin and ground personnel. Every effort should be made to ensure passengers are aware of the requirements for the carriage of batteries in their cabin or checked baggage.

Read the lithium battery cabin safety bulletin.

Prop governor warning

A warning has been issued about a potential problem with McCauley propeller governors. The issue relates to suspected unapproved parts that may not conform to the approved design. Checks should be made in relation to any McCauley propeller governor with an idler gear bearing part number A-20028, marked “BA-59”. The bearing is installed within the oil pump idler gear of the governor to boost engine oil pressure to facilitate propeller blade control. Problems with the bearing can cause the governor to lose some or all control. In a single-engine aircraft this will show as the RPM being too high, with an inability of the governor to keep the RPM down. In twin-engine aircraft the RPM will be too low, with an inability to bring the RPM up to the set speed or may result in the propeller going into uncommanded feather. Bearing deterioration or failure may also cause metal contamination within the engine oil system, with consequential wear and damage to internal rotational and reciprocating assemblies requiring engine bulk-strip for repair. CASA recommends aircraft owners, operators, maintainers and parts distributors inspect their aircraft records and parts inventory for the identified suspected unapproved parts and take appropriate action. A McCauley Service Bulletin provides more information.

Go to the propeller governor airworthiness bulletin.

In Brief

  • Michael Bridge has been appointed to the CASA Board for a three-year term. Mr Bridge is a former chief executive of Airnorth and has more than 30 years experience as a pilot. He brings considerable aviation safety, management and corporate governance experience to the CASA Board.
  • The dates for the 2019 Flight Examiner Rating course classroom workshops have been released. The workshops will be held from February to October 2019 in Perth, Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney. Participants must enroll at least 21 days before each course.
  • A new easy to use form is on the CASA web site to help members of the public and the aviation community report unsafe drone operations. The form captures the information CASA needs to investigate potential breaches of the drone safety regulations. CASA has issued nearly 50 infringement notices during 2018 to date for drone safety breaches.
  • A summary of the feedback to consultation on the review of Part 145 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations has been released. A technical working group under the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel will be formed to analyze the issues identified and develop solutions.
  • An Ayers Rock airspace review report has been released. The review found there were no risks that required changes to the existing Ayers Rock airspace. Stakeholder feedback focused on improving efficiency and shared use of the airspace.
  • A proposed manual of standards to accompany the remotely piloted aircraft regulations has been released for comment. The proposed requirements create clear standards for remote pilot training and training organisations, create Australia’s first official syllabi for the remote pilot licence, clarify requirements for drone operations in controlled and prescribed non-controlled airspace, facilitate extended visual line of sight operations and formalise recordkeeping and notification requirements for drone operators.
  • Comments are being sought on the manual of standards for Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Part 149, which was made earlier in 2018, covers approved self-administering sport and recreational aviation organisations. Consultation is open until 21 October 2018.

Pilot seminars in October

The current series of AvSafety seminars provides support for developing pilot skills in three key areas - communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The focus is on operations at non-controlled aerodromes, with a practical scenario used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. Discussion will look at how threat and error management techniques complement the technical aspects of flying an aircraft. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In October 2018 seminars are being held at:

  • Albury
  • Atherton
  • Cairns
  • Clare Valley
  • Coffs Harbour
  • Echuca
  • Geraldton
  • Horn Island
  • Maryborough, Victoria
  • Mt Isa
  • Port Lincoln
  • Port Macquarie
  • Yarrawonga.

Book a place at your local AvSafety seminar.

October seminars for engineers

Seven engineering seminars are being held in October 2018. These seminars will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. Engineering seminars are at:

  • Adelaide
  • Albury
  • Geraldton
  • Horn Island
  • Jandakot
  • Parafield
  • Perth

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.



Social Media

Follow CASA on social media now.

We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and YouTube.

 


CASA: Have your say on proposed new drone rules [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Have your say on proposed new drone rules

CASA is seeking public feedback on new draft rules for commercial or professional drone operations.

The new rules are designed to improve safety and certainty for remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) operations (popularly known as drones). They aim to:

  • create clear standards for remote pilot training and training organisations
  • create Australia’s first official syllabi for RPAS accreditation, in particular, the remote pilot licence (RePL)
  • clarify requirements for RPAS operations in controlled and prescribed non-controlled airspace
  • facilitate extended visual line of sight (EVLOS) operations
  • formalise record keeping and notification requirements for RPAS operators generally.

The rules are contained in the draft manual of standards (MOS) of Part 101 of Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR). The MOS helps standardise the professional drones industry by setting specific training and operational requirements. These support the rules already in place under CASR Part 101.

Only a small section of the proposed new rules will directly affect recreational users – clarifying the requirements to operate in controlled and non-controlled airspace. So, for people who fly for fun, all the basic drone rules remain the same.

 


Update on the Manilla Slopefest Raffle.

From the AMAS Inc President:

Each year we run a raffle at slope fest for attendees and the winners drawn at the Saturday night presentation dinner. 


The raffle proceeds have in the past gone to Cancer Research.

This year in support of Manilla Township the proceeds went to Manilla Lions club. 


Slope fest sponsors are very generous and their contact details can be found here:
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2994346-Manilla-Slope-Fest-2018

In an effort to raise much needed funds for our drought affected farmers I had an idea to offer a raffle prize for all those unable to make it to this event.

Tickets ($5each no limit ) could only be bought on line for this prize and drawn Saturday September 15th in the evening. . 

I donated a NIB Dream-flight Alula. https://dream-flight.com/products/alula-trek
Complete with servos and a battery posted anywhere in Australia.

Id like to thank everyone for their generosity.


We raised a whopping $4601.25 in the raffles and on site auction..

Steve and Glen handed the money over to the Manilla Lions Club on Sunday morning and they were shocked to get such a generous amount.

An awesome result!

 

The total for the on line raffle was $440.00       With 88 online tickets sold. 

The winning ticket was drawn by a random number selector was one bought by a person who purchased over 20% of the tickets.

I guess the numbers game works.  


The onsite raffle raised $3511.25


The Sig Samarai model built by Jeff Greene from Coffs Harbour sold for $500.00
and the Jart fuse he donated sold for $150

 

Thank you all who participated.   

Phil Poole    

AMAS Inc President.

BluewaterTownsville FunFly Flyin

17th and 18th November!
Fly in 17- 18  Nov 2018 final

Bundaberg Aeromodellers Fly In

Members:


Only a couple of weeks until our Spring Fun Fly. All types of aircraft welcome, no registration fee and insurance provided for visitors.
If you are intending coming along could you please contact the club so we have an idea of numbers, particularly if you are camping.
Breakfast and lunch available from the canteen Saturday and Sunday, cold drinks, tea/coffee and snacks.

Bundy  Event

Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 3-18

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 22nd September, 2018

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 8th September, 2018.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member(s)


Edit: 9-9-18   The following nominations have been received:


President:         Mr Phillip Poole

Vice President: Mr Peter Coles

Secretary:         Mr Mike Snabaitis

Treasurer:         Mr John Taylor

Committee:       Mr Lex Cunningham


 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th August  2018. Edit: 14-8-18, No agenda items and no notices of motion were received.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 9th August  2018 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 6th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 20th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

Manilla Slope Fest

Members,

A message from the acting AMAS Inc President Mr Phillip Poole,

 

Annual "Manilla Slope fest" charity raffle 
Each year we run a raffle at slope fest for attendees and the winners drawn at the Saturday night presentation dinner. 
The raffle proceeds have in the past gone to Cancer Research.

This year in support of Manilla Township the proceeds will go to Manilla Lions club. 
Slope fest sponsors are very generous and their contact details can be found here. 
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...lope-Fest-2018

In an effort to raise much needed funds for our drought affected farmers I had an idea to offer a raffle prize for all those unable to make it to this event.

Tickets ($5each no limit ) can only be bought on line for this prize and drawn Saturday September 15th in the evening. . 

I have donated a NIB Dream-flight Alula. https://dream-flight.com/products/alula-trek
Complete with servos and a battery posted anywhere in Australia.

Glenn from Off the Edge Sailplanes Will keep a record and tally of the tickets sold http://www.offtheedge.com.au/page.php?id=1 

Ticket purchases can be made to his PayPal account. orders@offtheedge.com.au .

Be sure to include your name and phone number with your ticket purchase. 

Phil Poole.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - August 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing, your monthly CASA update

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

New rule making thank you - new CASA Board chair

I would like to thank everyone in the aviation community who is participating in the busy current round of new rulemaking. The broad consultation phase for key proposed parts of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations is either complete or nearing completion. Consultation on Part 91, covering the general operating rules, and Part 133, covering rotorcraft air transport, has closed. The comment period for Part 121, covering large air transport, and Part 135, covering small air transport, is open until early September 2018 and includes Part 119, which covers air operator certificates. These rule sets address important safety and operational issues that directly affect much of the commercial aviation community. The feedback we are receiving plays a vital role in ensuring the final regulations are fit for purpose, target known safety risks and do not impose unnecessary regulatory burdens. We will carefully consider all the comments before finalising the rule sets as quickly as possible. My target is to have these operational regulations made before the end of 2018 and taking effect in early 2021. The first step has also been taken in developing specific new regulations for general aviation maintenance, with these rules to be completed in 2019 and introduced later.

I would also like to acknowledge and welcome the appointment of Tony Mathews as chair of the CASA Board for a three-year term. Tony brings a wealth of aviation safety expertise to the Board. He is a former Qantas regional airline manager, Royal Flying Doctor Service manager, and a qualified airline transport pilot. He previously served as the deputy chair of the Board of Airservices Australia.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


Piston engine valve warning

All piston engine aircraft operators and maintainers need to be aware of an increasing incidence of premature exhaust valve and valve guide wear. The problem is mainly being found in R22 and R44 helicopters used in mustering in northern Australia but could develop in any aircraft subject to certain operational conditions. The valve wear is due to elevated combustion temperatures which can lead to cracks or large chips forming around the edge of the valve face. The valve head can also separate from the stem, causing sudden loss of cylinder compression. In some cases, problems have emerged in less than 100 hours after inspection. A stakeholder working group has been formed to investigate the causes of the engine problems and will look at a range of issues including changes to the AVGAS grade and how this relates to operations in high air temperature environments. The working group includes representatives from Lycoming, Viva Energy and the Australian Helicopter Industry Association, maintainers and CASA. In an airworthiness bulletin on the issue CASA makes a range of recommendations about fuel supply and handling, engine cylinder cooling, instrument calibration, fuel flow, maintenance and engine condition monitoring. All instances of premature exhaust valve wear should be reported to CASA using the defect reporting system.

Get all the details on the exhaust valve issue.

New regs for general aviation maintenance

The first step has been taken to develop a set of streamlined new maintenance regulations for the general aviation sector. New maintenance regulations will minimise the regulatory burden on general aviation, keep compliance costs as low as possible, be based on the best practices of other leading aviation nations and maintain appropriate levels of safety. CASA has started development of the new general aviation maintenance regulations by asking the aviation community for views on current challenges and opportunities. Feedback has also been sought on existing regulations in the United States, New Zealand, Europe and Canada. Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said CASA was not seeking to re-invent the wheel with the new general aviation maintenance regulations. “We know there are tried and tested sets of maintenance regulations used by other leading aviation nations and we want to base our new rules on these as far as is possible,” Mr Carmody said. “These nations have a strong safety record underpinned by well-regarded safety regulations.” The proposed new regulations will cover maintenance for aircraft used in private and aerial work operations. The air transport sector, including charter and regular public transport, will not be covered by these regulations.

Find out more about the new general aviation maintenance regulations project.

Old licences no longer valid

The four-year transition period for the new flight crew licensing regulations ends on 1 September 2018. From that date old licences and authorisations will no longer be valid. However, the transition provisions are being updated to allow individuals to convert their old licences and authorisations to an equivalent Civil Aviation Safety Regulation Part 61 licence or Part 64 authorisation at any time. All active pilots should have already converted their old licences — issued under Part 5 of Civil Aviation Regulation 1988 — to a new Part 61 licence. This should have happened at the time of any proficiency check, flight review or other licensing activity in the last four years. Pilots who are not actively flying don’t need to convert their old licence before 1 September 2018. These pilots can complete the relevant paperwork at any time and apply to CASA to be transferred to a new Part 61 licence. Before flying they must make sure they have a valid flight review or proficiency check for the ratings they are going to use. Old aeronautical radio operator certificates and flight radiotelephone operator licences issued under the Civil Aviation Regulations cannot be used from 1 September 2018. However, the transition provisions allow holders of these certificates and licences to convert to an equivalent Part 64 authorisation up until 31 August 2025. Please note, from 1 September 2018, CASA will charge a fee of $25 to reissue a Part 61 licence and a Part 64 authorisation.

Find out more about the licensing regulations.

New smaller aeroplane air transport rules

Consultation on new smaller aeroplane air transport regulations closes on 2 September 2018. CASA is seeking comment on the proposed Part 135 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, its manual of standards and the associated Part 119 which covers air operator certificates. A key change in the new regulations will be common rules for all air transport operations – doing away with the current distinction between charter and regular public transport. There are safety enhancements such as crew training and checking requirements, human factors training and safety management systems. The implementation of new requirements will be scaled to fit the size and complexity of operations to keep the regulatory burden to a minimum. Other changes relate to minimum equipment lists, aerodrome requirements, simulator requirements, the carriage and use of oxygen, sterile cockpits and terrain awareness systems. A key driver behind the proposed changes is minimising the difference in accident rates between small aeroplane charter and regular public transport operations. The charter accident rate in smaller aircraft is eleven times higher than equivalent regular public transport. CASA is proposing to start the new regulations in March 2021, with some requirements to apply from a later date to give the aviation community more time to prepare for change. Part 135 will apply to aircraft with a maximum take of weight of 8618 kilograms and a maximum passenger seat configuration of not more than nine. It will cover current passenger charter and regular public transport, as well as cargo and aerial work ambulance functions.

Find out more about Part 135 and comment now.

Proposed larger aeroplane air transport rules

Proposed new regulations for larger aeroplane air transport operations have been released. Part 121 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations will cover regular public transport, charter, cargo and ambulance work in aeroplanes with a maximum take-off weight of more than 8618 kilograms or more than nine passenger seats. The proposed rules retain many existing requirements, while consolidating regulations into one document suite and making them more operationally focused. There are a number of new requirements to bring Australia up to date with leading international standards. Proposed changes relate to extended diversion time operations, fuel and alternate aerodrome requirements, narrow runway operations, underwater locating devices, medical equipment, inexperienced flight crew rostering and cabin crew training and checking. The new rules allow as far as possible for an outcomes-based approach to be used by air operators. The proposed Part 121 is accompanied by the proposed new Part 119, which covers air operator certificates. A key outcome of the package of new rules will be a common level of safety for current charter and regular public transport operations, with both becoming air transport operations. CASA plans for the new rules to come into effect in March 2021, although some provisions may have a later start date if air operators need more time to transition.

Get more on Part 121 and comment before 2 September 2018.

Keeping carry-on baggage safe

Advice on the management of carry-on baggage and baggage issues during emergency evacuations has been released by CASA. Evidence from aircraft accident investigations shows many passengers attempt to take carry-on baggage with them during an emergency evacuation. This can hinder evacuations, cause injury to passengers and crew members, and damage aircraft safety equipment such as evacuation slides. It is important to prevent non-compliant hand luggage from entering an aircraft and this is a key safety role of ground and cabin staff. Crew members must be comprehensively trained in all aspects of carry-on baggage compliance. Operators should regularly review data on cabin baggage acquired through their safety management system. This should be used to evaluate current risk mitigation, inform safety promotion that prevents the carriage of overweight carry-on baggage, raises awareness of trending issues and support cabin crew decision making. There are a range of strategies to be considered to mitigate the risks of passengers retrieving carry-on baggage in an emergency evacuation. These include reinforcing the requirement to leave personal items behind during all passenger briefings, incorporating clearer illustrations into safety instruction cards and using simple, clear crew commands. Cabin crew training must focus on the problem.

Read the cabin safety bulletins on carry-on baggage and evacuations and the management of carry-on baggage.

In Brief

  • The notification requirement for drones operated in the under two kilogram excluded commercial category has been changed. Notification is now required to be renewed every three years instead of every two. However, notification must be updated if the operator makes changes to their operations.
  • Requirements for Part 141 and Part 142 flight training operators to have an alternative person to carry out the duties of key personnel have been removed. A new exemption recognises circumstances where it is unnecessary to have alternative personnel. This change will assist smaller flight training operators and those who provide occasional flight training.
  • Changes to the Part 61 flight testing and proficiency checking system have been introduced, including prescribing check standards in a new format. The new standards provide more flexibility in the design and conduct of flight tests and proficiency checks. The Part 61 manual of standards has been amended.
  • new exemption allows flight examiners, approval holders, approved testing officers and instructors to conduct flight tests, proficiency checks and flight training from a non-control seat to a limited extent. This removes any doubt about legal validity of the practice.
  • All approved testing officer delegations expire on 31 August 2018. From 1 September 2018 these functions are authorised by a flight examiner rating. Holders of this rating are indemnified by CASA up to a cap of $100 million.

Seminars for pilots teach skills

The new series of AvSafety seminars provides support for developing skills in three keys areas - communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The focus is on operations at non-controlled aerodromes, with a practical scenario used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours aimed at addressing human factors challenges encountered in single pilot operations. Discussion will look at how threat and error management techniques complement the technical aspects of flying an aircraft. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In September 2018 seminars are being held at:

  • Albany
  • Aldinga
  • Ayr
  • Archerfield*
  • Caboolture*
  • Cowra
  • Devonport
  • Gold Coast*
  • Hobart
  • Jacobs Well*
  • Kalgoorlie
  • Moree
  • Moorabbin
  • Murwillumbah*
  • Port Augusta
  • Rawnsley Park
  • Rockhampton
  • Southport*
  • Sunshine Coast*
  • Taree
  • Tamworth
  • Wilpena Pound
  • William Creek

Seminars marked with an asterisk include a brief on the World Parachute Championships, being held on the Gold Coast between 4 - 14 October 2018.

Book a place at your local AvSafety seminar.

Important seminars for engineers

Two engineering seminars are being held in September 2018. These seminars will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. Engineering seminars are at:

  • Moorabbin
  • Sunshine Coast.

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.

Notice of Annual and General Meeting. 2-18

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 22nd September, 2018

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 8th September, 2018.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member(s)


 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th August  2018. Edit: 14-8-18, No agenda items and no notices of motion were received.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 9th August  2018 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 6th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 20th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

Brisbane Drone Zones

Members,

Correspondence received from Mr Steven Gilbert:

Hi Mike I would like to let you know the trial drone zones in Brisbane have now been made permanent Thank you(the AMAS Inc) for all your help over the past 18 months. I hope this inspires others to lobby their councils so the zones can spread Australia wide.


here is the link to the story. https://tenplay.com.au/news/brisbane/2018/8/8/brisbane-city-council-makes-10-drone-zones-permanent


 


CASA July regulatory wrap-up [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]



July regulatory wrap-up

Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Announcements

New regulation for sport and recreational aviation

A new regulation for sport and recreational aviation (Part 149) was made on 16 July 2018. This is the first aviation regulation designed for the sector and formalises arrangements that have existed for some time via exemptions. It incorporates activities such as balloons, gliders, historic, experimental, ex-military and replica aircraft. We will shortly start consulting on a Part 149 Manual of Standards. View CASR Part 149 on the Federal Register of Legislation.

Consultation opens – rotorcraft air transport operations

We began consulting on new rules for rotorcraft air transport operations. The consultation is a combined consultation of Part 119 and 133 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. A webinar will be held on Thursday 2 August to provide further information and encourage people to provide their feedback to the consultation. Register to attend the webinar or find out more on our Consultation Hub.

We will also shortly start two consultations on proposed new rules for aeroplane air transport operations. One consultation will focus on Part 119 and 135 – smaller aeroplanes, and the second on Part 119 and 121 – larger aeroplanes. A webinar will be conducted for the smaller aeroplane consultation in mid August. Join our Flight operations mailing list to keep up to date.

Indemnification of delegations

On Monday 9 July 2018 the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport announced that indemnity will be provided to all flight examiner rating holders. Delegates, authorised persons and flight examiner rating holders will be indemnified from 1 September. More information is available on our website.

Consultations

Post-implementation review of the legislative framework for Part 139 - Aerodromes

We published a summary of feedback to proposed amendments as part of our post implementation review of Part 139 (1426AS). Part 139 contains the safety rules for aerodromes. We received 109 responses to the consultation in late 2017. A number of technical and policy issues will be resolved through working groups and reviewed by the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel before the final drafting of amendments. Read the summary of consultation on the Consultation Hub.

Instruments

We’ve published the Part 61 Manual of Standards Amendment Instrument 2018 (No. 1). The amendment of schedules 5 and 6 is part of a large body of work that has seen the implementation of the Flight Test Management system, updates to the Flight Examiner Handbook V2.1 (July 2018) and forms. Each part of the flight test and proficiency check system uses the same terms and format based on the new Part 61 MOS standards. View the amendment instrument on the CASA website.

Plume assessment

We will shortly be consulting on updates to how plume rise assessments are conducted. Advisory Circular AC 139-05 V3.0 will be the second revision and will replace the advisory circular issued in November 2012. Keep an eye out for the consultation on our Consultation Hub.

Exemptions

Flight examiner proficiency checks

New exemption (CASA EX70/18) extends the time an approved testing officer (ATO) has to complete a flight examiner proficiency check (EPC). It is consistent with previous arrangements (CASA EX133/16) which set the EPC due date for already transitioned ATOs according to their month and year of birth. View the exemption (CASA EX70/18) on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Flight training schools

We’ve published a new exemption that removes the requirement for a Part 141 or Part 142 operator to nominate an alternative key person when they are absent or unable to perform their duties.

View the exemption (CASA EX89/18) on the Federal Register of Legislation website.

Guidance and advisory material

Remotely piloted aircraft systems/ unmanned aircraft and rockets

We updated two advisory circulars (ACs) related to drones.

AC 101-01 v2.1 Remotely piloted aircraft systems – licensing and operations – has been updated to include advice related to legislative instruments made in 2017 and updates approach and departure paths for controlled aerodromes. Approach and departure diagrams for non-controlled aerodromes have been removed. Read AC 101-01 v2.1.

AC 101-10 v1.3 Remotely piloted aircraft systems – operation of excluded RPA – extends the required notification period to three years for all drone pilots who are flying within the category of operations. It also changes the dimensions of approach and departure paths for controlled aerodromes. Read AC 101-10 v1.3.

Projects

Medical certification standards

We’ve published information on our project concerning the changes to medical requirements for pilots. Read more about Project FS 16/08.

Part 66 Manual of Standards

A project to make amendments to the Part 66 Manual of Standards is underway. Project MS 18/04 will consider miscellaneous amendments, editorial and/or machinery changes such as incorporation of new aircraft types.

 


Senate Committee for Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport RPAS/UAS Final Report

From correspondence received:


The Senate Committee for Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport has now released their final report on the Current and future regulatory requirements that impact on the safe commercial and recreational use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS), Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and associated systems.

The senate committee  makes 10 key recommendations. The report can be found here:

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Rural_and_Regional_Affairs_and_Transport/Drones/Report

Notice of Annual and General Meeting.

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the operation of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Zoom video conference

10:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 22nd September, 2018

at location to be advised.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.


NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 8th September, 2018.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another financial member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member(s)


 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 8th August  2018.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 9th August  2018 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 23rd August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 6th September  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 20th September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - July 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Graeme Crawford

Recent debate about safety regulation and the general aviation sector has focused on the need for a sustainable and viable aviation industry. Implicit in this debate is the suggestion by some people that CASA does not support a sustainable and viable general aviation sector. I would like to assure everyone this is simply not true. There is no CASA agenda against general aviation and we regard the sector as a vital component of the national aviation community. Many of CASA’s staff are participants in general aviation, or started their careers in the sector, and have a practical understanding of the issues and challenges the sector faces. CASA can’t deliver solutions to the broader economic and social changes that are affecting parts of general aviation, but we can and will do our best to provide an appropriate safety regulatory framework that creates confidence in general aviation across the broader community. It is important that people from outside aviation have trust in the safety performance of general aviation and part of our job is to help ensure that trust is maintained.

CASA is focused on regulatory solutions that are both practical, proportionate and address aviation safety risk. We use available aviation sector information such as accident and incident data, surveillance findings and sector risk profiles to develop informed solutions. With that in mind the term ‘general aviation’ may not be granular enough as it covers a variety of aviation activities of which there are varying opinions within the aviation community regarding what is and what is not under the general aviation umbrella. Whilst this is challenging it is not unsurmountable and CASA will continue to develop regulatory solutions that consider risk appetite and safety consequences.

Finally, if there are people doubting our words about our commitment to general aviation then please look at our recent actions. Three major reforms this year to the aviation medical system are practical examples of reducing costs and impacts on the aviation community, particularly general aviation. The Basic Class 2 medical, which became available in early July 2018, is targeted at private pilots and makes getting an appropriate medical quicker, easier and cheaper. If you haven’t already please find out more about the Basic Class 2 and other medical reforms.

Best wishes
Graeme Crawford
(Shane Carmody is on leave)


Minister requires CASA to look at costs

CASA is required to consider economic and cost impacts on individuals, businesses and the community in its regulatory approach. That was a key message delivered by Deputy Prime Minister and Infrastructure and Transport Minister, Michael McCormack, to the general aviation summit in Wagga in July 2018. Mr McCormack said CASA was also required to take a pragmatic and proportionate approach to regulation as it applies to different aviation sectors. He said these requirements were contained in the Government’s Statement of Expectations issued to the CASA Board in March 2017. “These are not just words,” Mr McCormack said. “The statement of expectations is a legislative instrument and I expect the Board of CASA to ensure its requirements are met. I can also assure you that I will work in partnership with our aviation agencies and industry in tackling the challenges and opportunities for the general aviation sector, identified in the Government commissioned Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) study released late last year. These challenges are diverse. They range from fuel and maintenance costs, airport leases and charges; the impact of some regulatory changes and delays in CASA reviews to a lack of robust data on the general aviation sector. The study also showed that Australia is not alone in facing economic, demographic and regulatory factors affecting general aviation, with several major countries such as the UK, US and Canada also suffering declines in general aviation activity. BITRE’s recent release of the 2016 general aviation activity survey has showed some encouraging signs in terms of increased flying activity in some parts of general aviation such as aerial work, flying training and aerial mustering. But I acknowledge that there are still serious challenges facing general aviation. I will continue to listen and carefully consider the issues raised by people in the general aviation sector, and the Government and portfolio aviation agencies will respond appropriately. I am keen to hear from you on the key issues you want tackled by Government and industry that relate to general aviation operations in Australia.”

Go to Michael McCormack’s speech.

Comment now on new rotorcraft rules

A package of proposed new regulations and safety standards for the rotorcraft sector have been released for consultation. The package is made up of the proposed Parts 133 and 119 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, as well as the manual of standards for Part 133. Part 133 establishes the operating rules for rotorcraft conducting air transport operations and Part 119 covers air operator certificate requirements for air transport. The proposed changes for the first time create a specific set of operating rules for rotorcraft air transport operations. The central purpose of the new regulations is to enhance safety by improving standards in areas of known operational risk. Key changes include introducing an adaptable rotorcraft code of performance, specific mandatory simulator flight crew training requirements for certain rotorcraft, additional flight preparation and planning requirements, new fuel planning and fuel use rules, additional requirements for flights over water and medical transport requirements in line with international best practice and industry feedback. The Part 133 regulations will cover rotorcraft passenger charter, regular public transport, ambulance and cargo operations.

The proposed Part 119 introduces one set of safety requirements for all air transport operations. This removes the distinction between charter and regular public transport flights. Key changes include a requirement for all air transport operators to have an appropriately scaled training and checking system, an appropriately scaled safety management system, appropriately scaled human factors and non-technical skills training for all operational safety critical personnel and a safety manager. The way in which each operator meets these requirements will be matched to their size and complexity. In other words, CASA will not require a small, non-complex air operator to have the same systems and arrangements as a major airline or a large offshore helicopter operator. Eliminating the differences in safety standards between charter and regular public transport will open up opportunities for smaller operators in the future as they will be able to operate more types of scheduled flight services.

CASA is proposing the new Parts 133 and 119 would come into effect in 2021, along with the other new operational regulations covering aeroplane and aerial work operations. Consultation on the rotorcraft proposals is open until 21 August 2018. Aeroplane charter and regular public transport operators will be asked to comment on Part 119 and the aeroplane air transport rules in Parts 121 and 135 in a separate consultation package scheduled for mid-2018.

Get all the details on Parts 133 and 119 and have your say now.

Sport and recreation have their own regs

Australia’s first dedicated sport and recreational aviation safety regulations are now in place. The new Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations - Approved Self-Administering Aviation Organisations – was made in July 2018. Part 149 brings greater transparency, flexibility and certainty to this important aviation sector. The regulations replace a series of exemptions from the standard safety rules that have allowed individuals to operate sport and recreational aircraft. Part 149 focusses on the organisations that administer sport and recreational aviation activity and formalises diverse arrangements with these organisations that have been in place for many decades. The regulatory changes acknowledge the strong history of safe self-administration in sport and recreational aviation, as well as the popularity of the sector. They also acknowledge the high performance standards of modern sport and recreational aircraft. To operate under the new regulations sport and recreational organisations will need to apply for a Part 149 authorisation. CASA will work with organisations to develop the required documentation, which will outline how they will carry out safety-related self-administration functions. Functions covered will include flying operations, maintenance and pilot training and assessing. A manual of standards to support Part 149 is being developed and will be released for consultation during the second half of 2018.

Go to the Part 149 regulations.

Cockpit practice advice

Air operators should take an operational approach to maintaining the so-called ‘two in the cockpit’ practice. This is the advice from CASA following a review of the practice and consultation with the aviation industry. The operational approach to ‘two in the cockpit’ is in line with the position taken by the European Aviation Safety Agency. The ‘two in the cockpit’ practice was adopted as a precautionary approach in aircraft with a seating capacity of more than 50 passengers following the German Wings aircraft crash in early 2015. The review of the practice in Australia found there were unintended consequential risks, including the second person in the cockpit potentially distracting the pilot, making inadvertent contact with cockpit switches and taking cabin crew away from their safety role in the cabin. It was also found the practice complicated flight crew access to the cockpit and introduced an additional risk of flight deck incursion. The recommendation is for air operators to evaluate their own safety requirements and make an operational decision on whether to maintain ‘two in the cockpit’ in their standard operating procedures. CASA’s aviation medicine branch will continue to monitor pilot mental health and maintain a high level of awareness among pilots of mental health priorities and sources of assistance.

Spotlight on turbo clamps and couplings

Detailed new information on the best practices for maintaining turbocharged engine exhaust system clamps and couplings is now available. V-band couplings and clamps are used at the turbocharger exhaust exit to join to the tailpipe. The advice is also relevant to other piston aircraft engines that have V-band couplings and clamps in the exhaust system. The best practices guide was put together by a working group in the United States and has been published by the Federal Aviation Administration. CASA issued an airworthiness bulletin to highlight the guide. The guide covers typical installations, inspections, unsatisfactory conditions, failures and life limits. The need for the guide was driven by continued failures of V-Band clamps and couplings on turbocharged engines. In many cases the components are difficult to see during visual inspections. The guide has diagrams showing coupling and clamp failures including fractures, cupping and cracking. It provides recommended life-limits for particular types of V-Band couplings and includes useful maintenance tips and hints.

Find out about V-Band clamps and couplings.

Flight examiners win indemnity

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has given its commitment to complete a smooth and quick transition to the new Flight Examiner Rating system. This follows the announcement that CASA indemnity will be provided to all Flight Examiner Rating holders. The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Michael McCormack, announced the indemnity decision at the general aviation summit in Wagga. The new indemnity arrangements for Flight Examiner Rating holders will become effective from 1 September 2018. Approved Testing Officers will retain their current indemnity arrangements until they transition to a Flight Examiner Rating. About 800 Flight Examiner Ratings have already been issued by CASA, with about 260 Approved Testing Officers due to complete the transition by the end of August 2018. CASA CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, welcomed the Government’s decision on indemnity for Flight Examiner Rating holders. “CASA has been working hard behind the scenes to secure this decision as we understood the importance of this insurance indemnity for people working in flying training,” Mr Carmody said. “CASA will now complete the transition to Flight Examiner Ratings quickly and smoothly to minimise any impact on flying training. CASA appreciates the vital role the flying training sector plays in the aviation industry and will provide necessary support as these changes are implemented.”

Find out more about flight examiner indemnity.

Port Macquarie airspace review

A review of the airspace around Port Macquarie aerodrome has found there are no changes required to current airspace arrangements, although some improvements can be made. Airspace users identified the need for targeted education about frequency congestion and correct radio calls and procedures. There was also feedback about the need for additional aerodrome infrastructure such as a full length, parallel taxiway. The review, conducted by CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation, made three recommendations. CASA flying operations inspectors should conduct a safety assessment and thorough stakeholder consultation to determine whether the broadcast area should be retained or disestablished. The Port Macquarie – Hastings Council should continue with plans to construct a parallel taxiway. The Port Macquarie – Hastings Council should investigate the very high frequency ‘black spot’ at the southern end of the runway and identify and implement appropriate mitigators.

Read the Port Macquarie airspace review.

Make safety briefings a success

Professionalism, credibility and eye contact can be essential elements to delivering a successful passenger safety briefing on aircraft. Cabin crew members need to show safety leadership through body language and good public speaking techniques when making a safety briefing. They also need to show enthusiasm and to avoid hurrying briefings. This advice is contained in a new cabin safety bulletin issued by CASA on getting the most impact from cabin safety bulletins. International research continues to show passengers can incur serious injuries and death from an aircraft accident because they do not pay attention to cabin safety briefings. A National Transportation Safety Board accident report on US Airways flight 1549 that landed on the Hudson River in 2009, noted only about 10 of the 150 passengers retrieved their own life jackets after impact. The report indicated almost 70 percent of passengers did not watch any of the pre-flight safety briefing, with the most frequently cited reason for inattention being that passengers flew frequently and believed they were familiar with the equipment on the aircraft. Research has also found passengers do not take notice of briefings due to their confidence in the safety of flying, a belief that crew will take care of them and a poor delivery of briefings. Airlines can use surveys of passengers to test understanding of safety briefings.

Get more on safety briefings.

In Brief

  • A panel of writers and editors is being set up to provide CASA with additional communication resources. The writers and editors will help develop guidance material, advice, fact sheets, case studies and information campaigns for the aviation community. They will be skilled in communicating technical and regulatory information in plain, easy to understand language. The communicators will have experience in areas including flying, aeronautical engineering, aviation management, drones and psychology. A tender process to establish the panel is being run through the Australian Government’s AusTender system.
  • CASA has published a summary of feedback to proposed updates to Part 139 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Part 139 contains the safety rules for aerodromes. A number of technical and policy issues will be resolved through working groups and reviewed by the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel before the final drafting of amendments.
  • A project to make amendments to the Part 66 Manual of Standards is underway. This project is to make miscellaneous amendments, editorial and/or machinery changes.
  • An exemption has been extended to allow pilots to log co-pilot flight time when operating single-pilot certificated aircraft. The new exemption expires on 30 June 2021.
  • Jeff Boyd finished as Chair of the CASA Board on 30 June 2018. Jeff joined CASA in July 2014 as Deputy Chair under Alan Hawke, assuming the role of Chair in July 2015.

Seminars develop pilot skills

All pilots should be looking to enhance their skills. The new series of AvSafety seminars provides support for developing skills in three keys areas - communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The focus is on operations at non-controlled aerodromes, with a practical scenario used to explain the concepts of threat and error management. Pilots work through relevant defensive flying behaviours. Discussion looks at how threat and error management techniques complement the technical aspects of flying an aircraft. At each seminar pilots will be given special cards with key information on communication, situational awareness and threat and error management. The cards can be kept in a new AvSafety resource folder to build a library of critical safety information. Cards and folders are only available to people who attend AvSafety seminars.

In August 2018 seminars are being held at:

  • Caloundra*
  • Camden
  • Darwin
  • Gove
  • Katherine
  • Lilydale
  • Parkes
  • Redcliffe*
  • Tyabb
  • Wollongong

*Redcliffe and Caloundra will include a brief on the World Parachute Championships being held on the Gold Coast between 4 - 14 October 2018.

Book a place at your local AvSafety seminar.

Seminars for engineers

Four engineering seminars are being held in August 2018. These seminars will cover a range of topics including leadership and mentoring for aviation maintenance engineers, specialist maintenance certification, Flight Safety Australia maintenance articles and a regulation review update. They are aimed at engineers, heads of airworthiness and maintenance, other people from airworthiness organisations and training personnel. The seminars are a great professional development opportunity and allow people to talk with CASA maintenance experts and ask questions. Engineering seminars are at:

  • Airlie Beach
  • Gove
  • Mackay
  • Victoria River Downs

Find out more and book a place at an engineering seminar.

New regulation for sport and recreational aviation (Part 149) [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

**New regulation for sport and recreational aviation (Part 149)**

16 July 2018

Sport and recreational aviation has received a new level of recognition in
Australia, with the making of the first aviation regulation designed for
the sector.

The regulation formalises co-regulatory arrangements that have existed for
many decades with sport and recreational aviation organisations, but
previously only in conditional exemptions from the standard aviation rules.

The new Part 149 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR)
brings more transparency, flexibility and certainty for the sector. The
sector incorporates a range of activities that cover non-standard aircraft
types such as balloons, gliders, historic, experimental, ex-military and
replica aircraft.

The regulatory change acknowledges the strong history of safe
self-administration in sport and recreational aviation, and the popularity
of sport and recreational aviation today. It also acknowledges the high
performance standards of today's sport and recreational aircraft.

The new Part 149 regulation recognises sport and recreational aviation as a
standard sector of aviation in Australia.

**Next steps**

To operate under Part 149, sport and recreational organisations need to
apply for a Part 149 authorisation. CASA will work with organisations to
develop their documentation, which will outline how they will safely carry
out important aspects of their safety-related self-administration
functions. This could include flying operations, maintenance and training
and assessing.

CASA will shortly open a consultation on a Part 149 Manual of Standards,
which will need to be in place before organisations can operate under the
new ruleset.

Finalising the Part 149 regulation has been a priority for CASA's
regulatory program and has been developed over many years in close
consultation with industry.

View CASR Part 149 on the Federal Register of Legislation
<https://mailinglist.casa.gov.au/lists/lt.php?tid=PvvALx9GWS+tNzs3tVPnqfio3F2vCprZuus1bUJ0dWDXDhfKaYGcM6pGtu6jYXKH>
.

RPAS - SSRP workshop [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED] presentations

Presentations conducted at the RPAS SRP in Sydney  can be found via the Documents Tab on the AMAS Inc website and via the direct links below:


and

Once the finalised Risk Register is received from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, the document will be circulated to the greater membership for feedback.

Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems - Sector Safety Risk Profile workshop [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Coordination and Safety Systems Branch, through its Strategic Analysis team and CASA’s subject matter experts, identifies risk factors and monitors trends in the Australian aviation system. To enhance CASA’s capability to monitor trends and risk factors, CASA has developed a tool for aviation industry sector safety risk profiles which provide a strategic view of risks in a defined industry sector and a platform for the coordinated response and management of risks across a sector. This tool requires the application of the risk profiling methodology to a data set relating to a defined sector. The defined sector CASA is currently reviewing is Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems.

Following an initial workshop conducted in Brisbane (March 2018) it was decided to  conduct four workshops to address the risks in the following subcategories:

·         ReOC operators – non-complex operations

·         Excluded category

·         Sports / Recreation (Model Aircraft) Part 101.G

·         ReOC operators – complex operations  

 

CASA will be holding a workshop at the CASA Office in Sydney to identify the risks associated with Sports/ Rec category operations. We would like to invite your society  to participate in the upcoming workshop. The workshop forms an important part of the sector risk profile development process. 

 

The core purpose of the workshop will be to identify risk causes, sources and hazards using the combined knowledge of industry representatives and CASA Reference Group. Sector safety risk profiling is a CASA initiative to identify sector specific risks and to develop strategies to treat these risks with the involvement of the sector participants. It also provides the opportunity for CASA and the industry to collaboratively work on the management of risks and to adopt flexible treatment measures that suit the unique characteristics of the operation.

  

CASA values your time and industry knowledge and appreciates your societies contribution to this initiative. Workshop materials and agenda will be sent to you closer to the date of the workshop.

Thanks in anticipation of your society participating in the workshop.

The CASA Briefing - June 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

The CASA Briefing

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

By now most people are probably aware that I have been permanently appointed as CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety for a five year term. I am honoured to have been given the opportunity to lead CASA through a time of challenges and changes. My vision is for CASA to be an open and transparent regulator and one the aviation industry finds it easy to do business with. I am especially keen to improve our service delivery. People coming to CASA for approvals, licences or certificates have every right to expect efficient, streamlined and timely service. To do this we will continue to improve our systems and processes. Streamlining our systems and centralising data will also make us more effective in continuing to improve aviation safety. The correct analysis of data provides an opportunity to create a new proactive model of risk management. We want to be able to take a risk-based, rather than a knee-jerk approach to safety management. A key element to this approach will be to keep the aviation community ‘in the loop’ about the issues we see emerging from the data and from our broader sectoral analysis.

A current challenge for CASA is the growth of unmanned aircraft, or drones. Drones have enormous potential for making aviation and society safer, by doing many of the repetitive and dangerous aerial jobs without risking human lives. However, this emerging industry poses challenges to us as the regulator because we now have to deal with both emerging technology and a new group of people who have had little or no exposure to aviation. One of my priorities will be bringing this new group into the broader aviation community, so that together we maintain and improve Australia’s aviation safety performance.

I must emphasise that I understand CASA needs to do things differently. In particular, I know many people are frustrated by delays in some of our regulation reform processes. These have been too slow and too long and not sufficiently focused on practical, common-sense outcomes. However, I am confident that by working co-operatively with the aviation community we can make positive progress and deliver effective change that achieves safe skies for all.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety


Consultation reboot for better results

A substantial overhaul of the way CASA consults with the aviation community has been announced. Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody has set up a new body to ‘reboot’ consultation processes. The changes will streamline consultation and ensure the aviation community is directly involved in the early setting of safety and regulatory objectives and policies. CASA will now get timely advice on current and emerging issues from a cross section of aviation organisations. A new consultation body, known as the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel, is being established from 1 July 2017. It is to be made up of senior representatives from Qantas Airways, Virgin Australia, the Australian Airports Association, The Australian Aviation Associations Forum, the Regional Aviation Association of Australia and Recreational Aviation Australia. The Aviation Safety Advisory Panel will provide CASA with objective, high-level advice from the aviation community on issues with significant implications for aviation safety and the way CASA performs its functions. CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel will become the avenue through which CASA seeks aviation community input on regulatory and policy approaches. He said: “Most importantly, it will be the forum through which we seek to agree on the objectives and policy outcomes – before we then call our technical experts to do the detailed work. CASA’s overriding responsibility for aviation safety leadership, however, means that there will always be limits. We cannot appease everyone, nor meet every request as regulatory activities are inherently challenging and CASA ultimately has to make the call on major safety questions. My intention is that once we have settled on a position we will stick to it and deliver on what we have said we will deliver. If we can do this, we will maintain the trust and respect of the aviation community as a whole. I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has served on consultation panels in the past.”

Take part in our service survey now

CASA is committed to improving the delivery of regulatory services to the aviation community. To achieve this goal we need the help now of everyone who uses CASA’s services. A short survey is underway to give CASA a better understanding of the service needs and preferences of people in the aviation community. The results of the survey will be used to make practical changes to CASA’s service delivery systems and processes. Questions in the survey include how easy it is to obtain CASA services, the level of satisfaction with service delivery, how services should be delivered, how CASA should contact people and how applications for services should be submitted. The survey is multiple choice, with the option to provide written comments as well. All results from the survey will be anonymous, unless people choose to provide contact details. The survey is open until 5 July 2017. Anyone who would prefer a paper version of the survey can request a copy by sending an email to: industryofficer@casa.gov.au.

Take part in the service survey now.

Phone service improvements

From July 2017 CASA is making changes to improve the way phone calls are managed. Calls to all CASA 13 and 1300 numbers will now be diverted through to 131 757. The separate 1300 numbers for aviation medicine and licensing and registration will be redirected to a central telephone menu. This means 131 757 will become CASA’s primary contact number and should be used by all callers. People who call will be able to choose from a range of options, so that enquiries can quickly be directed to the most appropriate place in CASA. Options will include services relating to licensing, aircraft registration, aviation medicine, regional offices and unmanned aircraft. Callers to CASA will not need to do anything differently but they will notice a difference in the way calls are managed.

Pilots to play key role in new safety seminars

A new series of the popular AvSafety seminars for pilots starts from July 2017. The new series will get pilots talking about key safety issues by looking at previous accidents and incidents where the outcomes were both good and bad. This season of seminars will concentrate on pilot decision making during pre-flight, in-flight and approach and landing. Discussions will look at flying within your limits, making the right decisions in-flight and hazards on arrival. Case studies of accidents and incidents covering each phase of flight will be set out, with a mix of fixed wing and helicopter events to be examined. The aim of the seminars will be to get pilots thinking about their flying behaviour and decision making and to offer ideas and resources to support safe operations. CASA’s team of safety advisers will ensure the seminars are interactive and open, with pilots encouraged to talk about their own experiences and offer lessons learned. The seminars have been developed with the support of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, Airservices Australia, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and the Bureau of Meteorology. A representative from Bureau of Meteorology will attend some seminars to provide information on the new area forecasts format.

In July there are seven AvSafety seminars at: Port Pirie, Griffith, Wagga, Ballarat, Gawler, Moruya and Lilydale. The Port Pirie seminar will be based on the previous lessons for life format.

Book your place at an AvSafety seminar for pilots now.

Flight test system changes

Changes are being made to the flight test notification system. The new system, called Flight Test Management, replaces the current Flight Test Notification System from 3 July 2017. The new system will be accessed through the CASA on-line self-service portal. It means all flight examiner records and flight test data will be managed in one system and accessed through the self-service portal. Some paper-based processes will be replaced, eligibility validation will be provided and hard copy paper requirements will be reduced. The major steps for conducting flight tests and proficiency checks will remain the same. All flight examiners should ensure they have checked their qualifications are up to date in the CASA self-service portal as the new system starts. There are also changes to the flight examiner rating course and professional development program, flight test and proficiency check standards, and updates to guidance documentation. The training course for people who want to gain a flight examiner rating or flight examiner endorsement has been re-developed and is now made up of five phases. It provides for recognition of existing flight examiner qualifications.

Go to the CASA self-service portal.

Support for helicopter mustering safety

Everyone involved in helicopter mustering needs a new specialised safety information card. The card provides information on safety around mustering helicopters on the ground and in the air, passenger safety, emergencies and hiring a helicopter for mustering. The card folds down to pocket size to make it easy to carry and hand out to non-aviation people involved in helicopter mustering. Simple illustrations are used to delivery safety messages about 11 key issues relating to safety around mustering helicopters. These include approaching and leaving the helicopter, riding a horse or motorbike near a helicopter, awareness of helicopter blades, sloping ground and avgas drums. Passenger safety focuses on entry and exit, seat belts and seating, doors, headsets and dangerous goods. Four good reasons are set out for hiring a helicopter musting operator that meets all the civil aviation legal and regulatory requirements. People hiring helicopters are advised to ask the operator for a copy of their air operator certificate.

Order a copy of the helicopter mustering card now.

Switch now to new limited category certificates

Owners and operators of ex-military aircraft have until late July 2017 to transition to a limited category certificate under Part 132 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. Part 132 commenced on 28 January 2017, with transition to the new regulation required by 28 July 2017. Warbirds currently operating on an experimental certificate must transition to a limited category certificate. Under a limited category certificate operations and airworthiness authorisations will be managed by a self-administering organisation in cooperation with CASA. The rules enable other types of standard category aircraft, such as historic and replica aircraft, to operate on a limited category certificate. This type of certificate offers flexibility for personal flights and recreational purposes. As a result a number of people have already made the switch to the new rules. The new rules apply to the owners, operators and pilots of ex-military (warbirds), certain historic and replica aircraft, the owners of any other aircraft certified in the limited category and individuals and organisations that conduct or sell adventure flights in warbirds.

Find out more about the rules for limited category aircraft.

Spotlight on aircraft weighing

Twelve key points to remember when weighing aircraft have been set out in new advice from CASA. There have been recent reports of some general aviation aircraft being prepared for weighing using improper practices. Reports also indicate the preparation of aircraft and the weighing are not being documented properly. This makes it difficult to determine the configuration of the aircraft in which it was last weighed and throws doubts over the validity of the load data sheet. The purpose of aircraft weighing is to determine the baseline empty weight and empty weight centre of gravity of aircraft, with the information published in a load data sheet to provide for the accurate loading of aircraft before flight. Aircraft manufacturer instructions for weighing should be followed if available, with the airworthiness bulletin from CASA providing recommended practices. The recommendations include the state of the aircraft at weighing, configuration, equipment lists, fuel, oil and other liquids and levelling. Weighing documentation should be clear on what was and what was not included in the empty weight of the aircraft. This is important for the future comparison of weighing information.

Find out more about aircraft weighing.


The Bundaberg Aeromodeller's long weekend Spring time fly-in is on again this year. 
There are camping sites with toilets and hot showers, lunch & dinner Saturday and Sunday available, canteen and a pilot making workshop for those with a crafty bent and want to learn how to make heads and bodies

All types of aircraft welcome with a friendly fun fly format.
Bundaberg Aeromodellers welcome all flyers who follow CASA, the club by-laws and are have valid insurance with whoever. 
Because we allow any insurance, MAAA chooses to stop their member's insurance at our gate. However, if you want to fly here and share in our hospitality and facilities you can be signed in as a provisional member and be fully insured for the weekend.
For further information and bookings, contact the president - Wal. Details on the flyer

Bundy 2018  Oct  Event

AMAS Inc UPDATE / RENEWAL INFORMATION 2018-2019


The AMAS Inc Committee hope that the past year has treated you well and that you had many happy landings. AMAS Inc continues to grow with members in every state and territory and we hope that you'll continue to renew with the society and enjoy the relaxed fun community that makes up this society.

 

As many of you may be aware, the CASA has for quite some time, formally approved the society's application,to allow FPV flying among other matters including area approvals and flying displays.  AMAS Inc works  with the regulator and the society also engages with other federal,state and local government entities.The AMAS Inc  is also a member of the ACUO. 


 Member fees.

On June 1st early membership renewal is open for the 2018/2019 financial year covering the period July 1st 2018 until June 30th 2019 offering all the benefits that AMAS membership provides members and clubs.

The fees are as follows (and are again reduced!):

 

12    Month Membership $45 Senior and $10 Juniors


Renewals can be registered here:


http://www.amas.org.au/wspMemberRegistration-Join.aspx

 

The Future.

 

Our hobby is about family, friends and having fun. We will continue to provide insurance and other benifits at an affordable price without compromising service to you our valued member  whilst reaffirming our commitment to promoting the family and friends aspect of the hobby.

  

Now is a great time to join up potential members, especially juniors!

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The AMAS Committee hope the junior fee reduction will encourage the younger generation to embrace the joys of aeromodelling in the coming years. Furthermore partnering with the D1-Store, in providing member discounts, is another component of the society in which we believe adds value and encouragement in the membership.

 

Some of you expressed an interest in joining the committee, as noted in the member survey last year and we look forward to hearing from you. Simply phone of email the secretary for more information. You do not need any experience and we'd like people from all walks of life from across Australia to participate. So what are you waiting for ...  Get involved today!

 

Finally we would remind all members and clubs to check out our website(as it is a 'Live' document) for any changes  that have occurred.


Remember: "Get up and fly"!  and "Safety is no accident".


 

On behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

10 dollar junior fee
Porter boys full page  May- 18

CASA Briefing Newsletter - May 2018 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


Date of Publication: 
25 May 2018

The CASA Briefing, your monthly CASA update

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

CASA is continuing to work hard to bring improvements to the aviation community in the way safety regulation is delivered. Key changes have already been made to aviation medicals, with more change - in the form of the basic class two - imminent. A lot of effort is also underway to lift our service delivery, with a focus on providing a better and easier delivery of services online. The first steps in new online service delivery are due to be taken in the middle of this year, starting with a streamlined process to obtain aviation reference numbers. Very importantly, we have committed to providing a user-friendly guidance document for major new regulatory parts, such as the operations rules in Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. All these initiatives, and more, will lighten the regulatory load on everyone in aviation in Australia.

On top of these reforms we are working on a rationalisation of the way we charge fees for regulatory services. I cannot offer to abolish fees as we are required by government to recover a proportion of the cost of delivering services, but I can promise we will make the fee structure clearer and more predictable. There are currently around 360 different regulatory service fees and we are aiming to reduce this number down to around 100. We are proposing as many fees as possible to be fixed, rather than based on an hourly rate. This means the aviation community will have much more clarity around the charges to be paid to CASA for regulatory services. In line with Australian Government policy, CASA will publicly consult on proposed changes through a cost recovery implementation statement, which is due to be released later this year.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody


New fuel rules coming soon

New rules covering minimum fuel requirements for all Australian aircraft start on 8 November 2018. The new rules re-introduce a fixed fuel reserve requirement, reduce reserve requirements for day visual flight rules operations in small piston or turboprop aeroplanes, require pilots to conduct in-flight fuel management with regular fuel quantity checks and if required declare ‘mayday fuel’, and introduce ‘additional fuel’ which simplifies the planning requirements for fuel contingencies. The changes more closely align Australian fuel rules with the International Civil Aviation Organization standards and recommended practices. Many pilots and operators are already complying with standards in the new rules as they have been in CASA guidelines for some time. The changes remove uncertainty by clarifying what must be done legally. The mayday fuel declaration aims to increase safety. It alerts other airspace users to a potential fuel problem facing an aircraft in their vicinity and ensures priority is given to that aircraft, reducing the chances of an accident. Mayday fuel is not aimed at setting conditions to prosecute pilots or operators and a declaration does not automatically mean that emergency services will be mobilised. The fixed fuel reserve for day visual flight rules operations in small piston or turboprop aeroplanes will be 30 minutes.

Get all the details on the new fuel rules.

Stop bars mean stop

Pilots are being reminded of the importance of never crossing an illuminated aerodrome stop bar. Stop bars are a series of red lights co-located with runway holding point markings on taxiways that show where an aircraft or vehicle is required to stop when it does not have a clearance to proceed onto a runway. Taxiing aircraft must stop and hold at all lighted stop bars. Aircraft may only proceed further when given a clearance by air traffic control and when the stop bar lights have been switched off. If stop bar lights are not switched off after a clearance has been given pilots must seek clarification from air traffic control. Pilots must never allow their aircraft to cross an illuminated stop bar. The reminder about the importance of stop bars follows a number of instances of illuminated stop bars being crossed at Perth Airport. Pilots have been receiving clearance to enter a runway but are not waiting for the stop bar lights to be turned off. Pilots are also not challenging air traffic control when the stop bars remain on. Stop bars are a defence against runway incursions, which are a serious risk to safety.

Find out more about stop bars in an Airservices Australia fact sheet.

Helicopter pilots urged not to push on

Helicopter pilots are being urged to make a precautionary landing if a flight isn’t quite right. A campaign has been launched with the theme: ‘don’t push it, land it’. The campaign is supported by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and the Australian Helicopter Industry Association. All helicopter pilots - no matter their experience or the type of helicopter they fly - should take an early decision to make a precautionary landing if they experience a situation that just isn’t right. ATSB Chief Commissioner, Greg Hood, said making an early decision to land during the onset of an abnormal situation will reduce the likelihood of an accident from happening. “Pilots should always take advantage of their helicopter’s unique ability to land almost anywhere when things aren’t quite right in flight,” Mr Hood says. “If you’re faced with deteriorating weather or if something just doesn’t feel right, don’t push it, make a precautionary landing. If you do decide to push on, it could be the beginning of an accident sequence.” CASA supports and encourages pilots to make a precautionary landing when it is safe to do so. CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody says: “We have seen a number of fatal accidents where had the pilot decided to land, then the accident may not have occurred. CASA will not take any disciplinary action against a pilot if they need to make a precautionary landing, provided it is performed in good faith, as safely as possible and it did not endanger anyone.” President of the Australian Helicopter Industry Association, Peter Crook, says pressures and fear of scrutiny are often the impetus for pilots to ‘push on’ which can see them fly into an uncomfortable situation. Businessman and helicopter pilot Dick Smith has generously donated $20,000 to the helicopter association to help promote the safety messages of ‘don’t push it, land it’.

Read more about the don’t push it, land it campaign.

Take care with Cessna seats

Operators and maintainers are being reminded of the importance of properly maintaining and checking pilot seats and adjustment mechanisms in single engine Cessna aircraft. Action is needed to make sure seats do not move inadvertently during flight. There have been numerous accidents - several fatal - that have occurred due to inadequate inspection and maintenance practices on seat assemblies fitted to single engine Cessna aircraft. Problems occur due to incorrect placement of seat stops, worn seat adjustment mechanisms, poor seat latch/track engagement and the installation of unapproved parts. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA strongly recommends a number of actions. Maintainers need to be aware of airworthiness directives and special inspection requirements relating to pilot seats. They also need to make sure the correct components and parts are fitted to seats, such as seat stops and cotter pins, and to verify previously installed parts are genuine and correct. It is very important to ensure the primary seat locking mechanism, the secondary seat stop and rear track seat stops are correctly positioned. Pilots and passengers must check seat adjustment, locking and security during pre-flight checks. Care must be taken to ensure flight bags, headset cables, seat covers and other gear does not foul seat actuating or locking mechanisms, which could cause inadvertent seat movement.

Learn more in the Cessna seats airworthiness bulletin.

New wasp warning

A warning has been issued about a risk to aircraft safety from a new type of wasp. The key hole wasp is nesting in the Brisbane airport area and has been found at Emerald aerodrome. There is a concern the species could spread to other airports by aircraft or shared ground support equipment. Key hole wasps make nests based from alluvial sediments such as construction site material rather than soil, with peak nesting occurring during warmer temperatures and higher rainfall. The insects are active by day, although airport lighting can extend their activities. Nests are built cell by cell, usually at the furthest point from an opening greater than 5mm. A wasp nest can completely block aircraft pitot tubes, fuel tank vents and drains. Wasp nests and insect blockages in pitot tubes are not limited to small aircraft. In an updated airworthiness bulletin CASA makes a number of recommendations including the importance of installing pitot/static and vent covers any time an aircraft is parked. Probe covers should be regularly checked for damage. Pilots should be aware that on-ground pre-flight air data module BITE tests and/or computer checks will usually not test pitot probes or static vents for physical blockages. Areas where aircraft are stored or maintained should be regularly checked for wasp nests.

Read the updated wasp airworthiness bulletin.

Funds for better positioning technology

The Federal Government has allocated $160.9 million to deliver a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS) to improve the reliability and the accuracy of positioning data from five metres to 10 centimetres across Australia and its maritime zone. In addition, there will be a $64 million investment in the national positioning infrastructure capability, which will complement SBAS to improve GPS to an accuracy as precise as 3cm in areas of Australia with access to mobile coverage. The Minister for Resources and Northern Australia Matt Canavan said the funding in this year’s federal budget would support aviation. “The increased reliability provided by better GPS will improve safety for aircraft flying into regional and remote aerodromes, such as the Royal Flying Doctor Service fleet,” Mr Canavan said. “It will reduce the impact of weather on flight cancellations and diversions and improve the safety of landings. This is a practical investment to improve the lives of Australians and make businesses more productive. This technology provides instant, reliable and accurate positioning information, anytime and anywhere around Australia.”

Find out more about SBAS.

Drone review calls for registration and training

A mandatory drone registration scheme and online training for recreational drone flyers have been supported by a CASA review of the safety regulation of remotely piloted aircraft. The review indicated CASA should continue to support work by the manufacturers of remotely piloted aircraft to use geo-fencing technology to prevent drones operating in non-permitted areas such as at or near major airports and in certain classes of restricted airspace. The review was conducted at the request of the Minister for Infrastructure and Transport. Submissions to a 2017 discussion paper on drone regulation informed the review. In supporting mandatory drone registration, the review determined a registration process must be simple and the system easy to use. Data integrity would be paramount – including a requirement for an applicant to confirm their identity by using the Australian Government’s online document verification service. Owners would be required to renew their drone registration every three years. The review supported recreational drone flyers being required to undertake a simple online course on safe drone operations, followed by a quiz that has a minimum pass mark. This would address the issue of an increasing number of drone flyers who are unaware of the relevant drone rules, have a poor understanding of the rules or wrongly interpret the rules. CASA has not yet taken final decisions on possible changes to the drone safety regulations and any proposals will be subject to public consultation.

Read the drone regulatory review.

In Brief

  • Responses to consultation on the recommendations of the independent review of aviation fatigue rules for air operators and pilots have been published. The responses are currently being analysed before CASA finalises a position on the new fatigue rules, which will include an implementation timetable. The aim is to have key changes in place during 2018. Read the responses on CASA’s consultation hub.
  • A total of 298 submissions were made in response to consultation on a new proposal that would change the guidance for radio frequency use at uncharted aerodromes. CASA is reviewing the comments and will make a final decision on the multicom issue as soon as possible. Comments can be read now.
  • Thirty responses received during consultation on the post implementation review of Part 145 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations have been published. Part 145, which covers requirements for aircraft and aeronautical product maintenance, was first introduced in June 2011. The responses are on